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jerryking : carve_outs   7

British quantum computing experts leave for Silicon Valley
June 24, 2019 | Financial Times Madhumita Murgia in London.

A group of Britain’s best-known quantum computing scientists have quietly moved to Silicon Valley to found a start-up called PsiQ that believes it can produce a commercial quantum computer within five years.

The departure of some of the UK’s leading experts in a potentially revolutionary new field of technology will raise fresh concerns over the country’s ability to develop industrial champions in the sector.

The news comes just weeks after the successes of the British start-up scene were extolled at London Tech Week, where prime minister Theresa May pledged £150m specifically to help develop commercial applications for quantum computing.

The scientists’ move to Silicon Valley was driven partly by a need to raise capital. “The story is that the best of Britain is going to the United States to scale up,” said Hermann Hauser, co-founder of UK-based chip designer Arm, which is now owned by Japan’s SoftBank, and an early investor in PsiQ.

“They rightly concluded that they couldn’t access the capital in Europe so moved to the Valley,” he added. So far PsiQ has received investment from Playground Global, a venture firm started by Android founder Andy Rubin.

PsiQ, which has 50 employees according to LinkedIn, was co-founded by Jeremy O’Brien, a physicist at the University of Bristol and Terry Rudolph, a professor at Imperial College London. Several PhD graduates of the two UK labs have followed the researchers to Palo Alto, where the start-up has set up shop close to Stanford University.

Chief operating officer Stu Aaron was previously a partner at premier Silicon Valley investment firm Khosla Ventures and has worked for at least five start-ups based in California. 
carve_outs  funding  package_deals  Palo_Alto  PsiQ  quantum_computing  relocations  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  United_Kingdom 
june 2019 by jerryking
New York Prosecutors Hired at Boies Schiller - WSJ
Jan. 12, 2015 | WSJ | By ASHBY JONES.

Can this approach to team hiring be transferred to hiring in IT? What situations make sense for this approach? For Robert Berger...

A firm landing three federal prosecutors from the same office at the same time is highly unusual. But it was, in the words of Mr. Schwartz, “very much a package deal.” Said Mr. Zach: “All three of us wanted to work with people we trust and people we had worked with in the past.”
law_firms  Wall_Street  hiring  teams  David_Boies  carve_outs  package_deals 
january 2015 by jerryking
Venture Capital's New Adventure - WSJ.com
December 21, 2006 | WSJ | By PUI-WING TAM.

Usual Role of Nurturing Start-Ups Takes On a Private-Equity Twist; Mr. Lanza Becomes a Deal Maker...."I suddenly became aware that we were triggering a rollup in the sector and my phone was ringing off the hook," says Mr. Lanza, 50 years old. "It was very surreal. I'm used to wandering the halls of Stanford to fund companies founded by two guys and a dog."

Like Mr. Lanza, other venture capitalists have broadened their roles beyond investing in and nurturing start-up businesses. They more often find themselves handling spinouts -- or buying units of publicly traded companies -- as well as so-called rollups and buyouts, and generally engaging in more-complex financial transactions.

In other words, they have stepped into the realm of private equity, now one of the finance world's hottest arenas. The change could make investing in venture-capital funds more risky.
venture_capital  vc  private_equity  Intel  deal-making  spin-offs  spinups  roll_ups  buyouts  Pui-Wing_Tam  carve_outs 
april 2012 by jerryking
KKR Evolves, Hiring Trading Team From Goldman - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By GREGORY
ZUCKERMAN Evolution at KKR: Goldman's Genetics, The move KKR. to hire a
team of stock traders from Goldman Sachs is a sign of change sweeping
the private-equity industry. Prestigious buyout firms are plunging into
stock & bond trading, underwriting, & hedge funds, and away from
the LBOs that earned them fame and fortune. As recently as 2004, $14.4
B of KKR's $15.1 B of assets came from leveraged buyouts. Today, after
diving into debt trading, only $41B of its $54.4 B portfolio is from LBO
investments. And KKR, whose stock now trades publicly as KKR & Co.,
is actively examining a push into other businesses, according to people
close to the matter....Top executives at KKR and other firms argue that
in their research on buyout deals they uncover other investing
opportunities, such possible debt and stock purchases, that they can't
profit from without operating other kinds of investment vehicles.
diversification  private_equity  KKR  markets  buyouts  market_research  leverage  stocks  carve_outs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Start-Ups Hungry For Public Morsels - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ.com
March 27, 2009, 07:19 PM EST| Wall Street Journal| by Christopher Zinsli

Start-ups are taking advantage of the downturn purchasing carve-outs from public companies.
start_ups  growth  opportunistic  carve_outs 
march 2009 by jerryking

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