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Apple’s drive for world auto dominance spooks the industry - The Globe and Mail
GREG KEENAN, BRIAN MILNER AND OMAR EL AKKAD
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 20 2015,

Apple’s big advantage over traditional car makers is simple, yet hard to overcome, and it lies in the cloud.

The cloud consists of remote servers that store vast amounts of data and run applications, giving everyone on the planet with a connected device access to unlimited computing power essentially for free. It is also revolutionizing the way companies do business by instantly providing them with vast amounts of customer data. And it means Apple would not need to acquire car manufacturing capacity or build assembly and distribution networks in order to create chaos in the club.

It’s an advantage few traditional manufacturers, including auto makers, fully grasp, let alone have the ability to exploit.....“Apple thinks from the cloud out,” says Mr. McInerney, who would definitely line up for an Apple vehicle. At least then, he says, he would be assured of a better communications interface than the clunky one in his new upscale German model.

“If you’re an Apple or a Google, it allows you to use the same power to manage your supply chain that you use to manage your customers,” he says.

“That’s a revolution in thinking that allows you to identify all the cash-wait states [where money sits idle] and to collect a stunning amount of customer information in real time. Put the two together and you’re turning that information into cash at an accelerated rate. Car companies don’t think like that.”
automotive_industry  automobile  Apple  batteries  autonomous_vehicles  cloud_computing  connected_devices  layer_mastery  digital_first  data_coordination  incumbents  monetization  cash  customer_data  idle_funds  SMAC_stack  connected_cars 
march 2015 by jerryking
Managing: What entrepreneurs should watch out for
July 16, 1996 | The Globe and Mail |

fourth pitfall is the most difficult, Mr. Drucker says. “It's when the business is a success and the entrepreneur begins to put himself before the business. Now he asks himself, ‘What do I want to do? What's my role?’ "Those are the wrong questions. If you start out with them, you invariably end up killing yourself and the business. You should be asking, ‘What does the business need at this stage?’ The next question is: ‘Do I have those qualities?’
Peter_Drucker  entrepreneur  challenges  selfishness  pitfalls  cash  self-analysis  self-assessment  life_cycle 
july 2012 by jerryking
Martin Sorrell of WPP Group thinks companies need to get spending - WSJ.com
June 29, 2012|Wall Street Journal | Interview of Martin Sorrell by Alan Murray.

MR. MURRAY: Are you a concurrent indicator? A lagging indicator?

MR. SORRELL: We lead the downturn, and we lag the upturn. So, we get the worst of both worlds. If people are worried, they cut marketing spending. If things are going to turn up, they wait until they're confirmed.

Open Your Wallets
AUDIENCE MEMBER: Why do you think companies are sitting on too much cash?

MR. SORRELL: I started WPP with one other person 27 years ago. I decided to do something entrepreneurial. I borrowed £250,000 and bought into a shell company called Wire & Plastic Products, which is what WPP stands for, and wanted to build a very significant advertising and marketing-services company.

The system doesn't encourage people to take those sort of risks. Big corporations are natural bureaucracies, in the nicest sense of the word. Inherently, the system encourages conservatism.

To get out of where we are, you have to be expansive. Our strategy is simple: new markets, new media, consumer insight and then the ugly word, horizontality, getting people to work together. The first two involve taking risk. Myanmar opens up, 66 million people in that country. Major opportunity. You have to grasp it. We've gone in there in the first two weeks, repurchased an agency we had to sell because of sanctions, and we've gone in with our research operations.

When markets open up like that, you have to embrace the opportunities. I think the system doesn't encourage you to take those risks.
cash  economic_downturn  interviews  lagging_indicators  leading_indicators  Martin_Sorrell  origin_story  risk-taking  WPP 
june 2012 by jerryking
Gap Widens Between Tech Richest and the Rest - WSJ.com
MARCH 16, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | Ben WORTHEN. A handful
of cash-rich companies are consolidating power in the technology
industry, using their wealth to expand into new businesses and making it
harder for small and midsize competitors to break through. Why the
industry is evolving this way is rooted in balance sheets. Over the past
2 years, Apple Inc., Oracle Corp., Google Inc., Microsoft Corp. and 6
other large tech companies have generated $68.5 billion in new cash,
compared with just $13.5 billion for the other 65 tech companies in the
S&P 500 Index combined. Because of their massive cash accumulation,
these companies can afford to take risks that smaller companies can't
at a time when the economy remains fragile. The result is a bifurcated
tech landscape, says Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at MIT's Sloan
School of Management.
Apple  barbell_effect  Ben_Worthen  Big_Tech  cash  cash_reserves  consolidation  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Fortune_500  Google  large_companies  market_power  Microsoft  new_businesses  Oracle  risk-taking  small_business  start_ups  trends  winner-take-all 
march 2010 by jerryking

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