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jerryking : census   12

National Black Caucus of State Legislators: Preparing for the Age of Trump
BY: CHARLES D. ELLISON
Posted: December 4, 2016

As bad as that may look, however, don’t sleep on the NBCSL. With those numbers, none of the above eliminates the NBCSL’s truly massive importance as an august national body of black political power. Even if we can’t link to its website at the moment, it still manages to somehow connect and coordinate these 700 legislators, occasionally corralling crucial policy coordination on a wide range of issues when needed.

Black state legislators are like a first line of defense standing between national sanity and the global tempest that is Donald Trump, plus a fully decked GOP Congress. Need to change police-conduct standards? Call your local black state rep or senator because that’s in their wheelhouse. When Trump’s proposed $1 trillion infrastructure plan rolls out and trickles to states, black state officials will be key on oversight. And issues like education reform, charter schools and vouchers can’t really move without black state legislators’ eyes on them....."expressing frustration that the census woefully undercounts the national black population and that, unfortunately, many black constituents don’t help the situation by avoiding it. The significance of redistricting and racial gerrymandering cannot be underestimated: It plays a central role in structurally consolidating Republican political power to a gargantuan and potentially tyrannical degree."....New Jersey state Sen. Ron Rice (D-Newark), argued that’s why black elected officials must press aggressively for more collaboration among the state-, local- and federal-level groups, like NBCSL, the Congressional Black Caucus, the African American Mayors Association and the National Black Caucus of Locally Elected Officials. “This day and age, we can’t be playing around,” said Rice.

“We have to acknowledge the need to coordinate on a number of issues, like jobs, crime, education, and know what the other is doing,”
African-Americans  politicians  redistricting  constituencies  census  under-representation  undercounting  gerrymandering  organizational_capital  collaboration  coordination  policymakers  policymaking 
december 2016 by jerryking
Canada’s new census needs to capture nuances of fast-evolving economy - The Globe and Mail
MIKE MCDERMENT
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015

Building a world that better suits their needs is good for the Canadian economy and it starts with collecting better data.

In 2016, the government will reintroduce the census used before the previous government came to power. Adherence to inflexible testing principles and a looming print deadline mean that a more comprehensive survey will not be ready in time for next year. I understand this – it’s prudent to get accurate data. But printing? It’s 2015. We can file our taxes online; surely, we can a complete the long-form census online.

Perhaps a better question is: Can we afford to go five years between censuses given the current rate of change driven by technology? Just look at Canada’s manufacturing, automotive, and oil and gas sectors – rapid change in a fast-evolving world. In today’s world, five years is too long to go between drinks of new data, not to mention that five-year intervals translate into 10-year timelines before we can establish a trend. It’s high time we pick up the pace.
Michael_McDerment  Freshbooks  cloud_computing  census  statistics  rapid_change 
november 2015 by jerryking
Greenhouse Flower and Plant Production
Reference: 2006 and 2011 Census of Agriculture, Statistics Canada


Author :   Siva Mailvaganam - Statistician/OMAFRA
Last Reviewed :   15 July 2014
census  agriculture  Statistics_Canada  statistics 
august 2014 by jerryking
10% of African-American Households Have Incomes Above $100,000 - WSJ.com
August 24, 2013 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.
50 Years of a Dream
On the anniversary of the March on Washington, how has the outlook for white and black Americans changed?

Attitudes toward race have changed enormously. "It's not respectable today to be a racist. It was perfectly acceptable in 1963," says Eleanor Holmes Norton, one of the behind-the-scenes organizers of the March and now the District of Columbia's representative in Congress.

By nearly every available economic metric, African-Americans are better off today than earlier generations were.

Memories are short, but a few facts underscore just how much has changed in 50 years.

In 1966, the earliest year for which comparable data is available, 42% of African-Americans lived in poverty; in 2011, 28% did.

The income of the median black family, the one in the middle of the statistical middle, is 80% higher, adjusted for inflation, than a comparable family in 1963, the Census Bureau says.

And the ranks of blacks in the top stratum of American society has grown. The number of African-Americans in the U.S. has roughly doubled since 1963; the number with bachelor's degrees has increased 14 fold. As recently as 2000, there were more black men in prison than in college; that is no longer true.
African-Americans  anniversaries  MLK  racial_disparities  households  generational_wealth  census  statistics  income 
august 2013 by jerryking
How crowd-sourcing will spark a data revolution
March 22, 2012 |Globe and Mail Blog | by frances woolley.

Yet all of these initiatives are geared towards government data sets and professional researchers. Important private records – diaries of early settlers, for example – can find a home in Canada’s National Archives. But the Archives do not have sufficient resources to process and document records of snowdrops or goldfinches. Moreover, the Archives keep records, not data sets – it is fascinating to look at census records from 120 years ago, but they aren’t much use for statistical analysis.

There is a solution: crowd-sourcing. Across the country there are students, amateur and professional historians, policy analysts, bloggers and data nerds. I’m one of them. I’ve taken data collected by a notable Ottawa record keeper, Mr. Harry Thomson, and posted it on Worthwhile Canadian Initiative. Mr. Thomson’s records go back to the 1960s, long before Environment Canada began collecting comparable hydrometric data. An analysis of the data shows a significant decline in peak water levels during the spring flood – with this year being no exception.

Yet Worthwhile Canadian Initiative is just one blog in the vast expanse of the World Wide Web, and might not even be there in five or ten year’s time. We need a permanent site for all of this data, through which the collective power of the internet can be unleashed – editing, compiling, analyzing, telling stories and, above all, building understanding.
analog  archives  Canadian  cannabis  census  crowdsourcing  data  data_driven  datasets  massive_data_sets  nerds  open_data  record-keeping  Statistics_Canada  unstructured_data 
march 2012 by jerryking
Black influx impacts school choice in Detroit suburbs | detnews.com
March 24. 2011 | The Detroit News | Ron French and Mike Wilkinson. 2010 Census
Black influx impacts school choice in Detroit suburbs Whites seek other education options as blacks move in
census  Detroit  school_districts  schools  racism 
march 2011 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: A Nation in Motion
DECEMBER 22, 2010 | WSJ.com. The Census is in. There are now
308.74 million Americans, an increase of 27 million, or 9.7%, since
2000. Americans are still multiplying, one of the best indicators that
the country's prospects remain strong.
About 13 million of that increase were new immigrants. These newcomers
brought energy, talent, entrepreneurial skills and a work ethic. Their
continued arrival in such large numbers validates that the rest of the
world continues to view the U.S. as a land of freedom and opportunity.
The Census figures also confirm that America is a nation in constant
motion, with tens of millions hopping across state lines and changing
residence since 2000. And more of them are moving into conservative,
market-friendly red states than into progressive, public-sector heavy
blue states. In order the 10 states with the greatest population gains
were Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia,
Florida, Colorado and South Carolina.
census  population_trends  internal_migration  work_ethic  immigrants  immigration  North_Carolina 
december 2010 by jerryking
Paying for the public life
May 2001 | Economic Development Quarterly Vol. 15, Iss. 2; pg. 124, 8 pgs | by Paul R Levy.
BIAs  analysis  surveys  census 
june 2009 by jerryking

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