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jerryking : central_banks   20

The Bank of England future-proofs itself – MainStreetEcon
June 26, 2018 | Financial Times | by mainstreetecon 14 hours ago14 hours ago

[Future-proofing is the process of anticipating the future and developing methods of minimizing the effects of shocks and stresses of future events. ]
anticipating  Bank_of_England  central_banks  frameworks  future-proofing  monetary_policy  policymakers 
june 2018 by jerryking
On the money: a history of the Bank of England
SEPTEMBER 1, 2017 by: John Plender, the FT columnist and author of ‘Capitalism: Money, Morals and Markets’ (Biteback)

Till Time’s Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013, by David Kynaston, Bloomsbury £35, 896 pages
An enduring theme is the friction that existed from the outset between the Bank and its main client, the government. The Bank’s original charter was granted so that it could provide finance for the Nine Years’ War against France. On each renewal, the terms were the subject of much haggling and in the interim the Bank was constantly pressed to advance more money than it felt prudent. ....Another constant theme is forgery and fraud, with some of the Bank’s most senior employees being caught with their fingers in the till. In marked contrast to today’s post-crisis financial world, punishment was harsh. Many miscreants were hanged at Tyburn while the lucky ones were condemned to transportation.

As the 19th century progresses, Kynaston’s story turns increasingly on the issue that preoccupied great Victorian writers on monetary policy such as Henry Thornton and Walter Bagehot: how to reconcile adherence to the gold standard with financial stability. Numerous financial crises, including those surrounding the rescue of Barings and the collapse of Overend Gurney and the City of Glasgow Bank, are retold here with panache.
Bank_of_England  history  central_banks  book_reviews  books  monetary_policy  slavery  Walter_Bagehot  financial_history  19th_century  Victorian  financial_crises 
september 2017 by jerryking
Robocalypse Now? Central Bankers Argue Whether Automation Will Kill Jobs - The New York Times
By JACK EWING JUNE 28, 2017

artificial intelligence threatens broad categories of jobs previously seen as safe from automation, such as legal assistants, corporate auditors and investment managers. Large groups of people could become obsolete, suffering the same fate as plow horses after the invention of the tractor.

“More and more, we are seeing economists saying, ‘This time could be different,’”......among the economists in Sintra there was plenty of skepticism about whether the Robocalypse is nigh......Robocalypse advocates underestimate the power of scientific advances to beget more scientific advances, said Joel Mokyr, a professor at Northwestern University who studies the history of economics.....Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google — whose self-driving technology may someday make taxi drivers unnecessary — said that the plunging cost of information technology “has virtually eliminated the fixed cost of entering a business.” Companies can rent software and computing power over the internet..... disruptions caused by technology help account for rampant pessimism among working-class and middle-class people across the developed world.
artificial_intelligence  automation  Benjamin_Bernanke  central_banks  David_Autor  developing_countries  economists  fixed_costs  Hal_Varian  job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  Joel_Mokyr  pessimism 
june 2017 by jerryking
Yale to Build Tool Offering Real-Time Lessons on Financial Crises -
May 9, 2017 | WSJ | By Gabriel T. Rubin.

Yale University will launch an online platform to provide real-time support to policy makers dealing with financial crises, with the help of a $10 million gift from business leaders and philanthropists Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.

The gift represents a major expansion of the Yale Program on Financial Stability, a degree-granting program in the university’s school of management that aims to train early- and midcareer financial regulators from around the globe.

The new resources will support a small staff of researchers, led by Professor Andrew Metrick, as they build a database of “lessons from hundreds of interventions from past crises,” the university said. The effort is the first of its kind, according to Yale, and reflects a need for more research on “wartime” situations, rather than the preventive sort of regulatory research done by central banks around the world. Central banks often avoid extensive crisis preparations out of reluctance to promote moral hazard, leaving policy makers to reinvent the wheel each time a new crisis arises.....Mr. Geithner, who serves as the chairman of the Program on Financial Stability, said that he and other policy makers would have been able to act faster and with greater confidence during the financial crisis with access to the tools that Mr. Metrick’s team will build.

“There were probably four or five periods when the crisis was escalating, the panic was spreading, sitting on the phone for 20 hours a day trying to figure out how to do things,” Mr. Geithner recalled. “And we hadn’t had to do some of those things since the Great Depression. That took us a lot of time, and that can be costly.”

The open online platform will include descriptions of specific interventions—for example, the use of a “bad bank” to hold distressed assets—and will detail what did and didn’t work well in each case.
Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  crisis  regulators  Walter_Bagehot  central_banks  real-time  databases  lessons_learned  policy_tools  Peter_Peterson  reinventing_the_wheel  policymakers  confidence  economic_downturn  decision_making  speed  the_Great_Depression  crisis_management  crisis_response  Tim_Geithner  moral_hazards  financial_crises 
may 2017 by jerryking
Central banks worldwide need more tools to co-ordinate policy -
Dec. 24, 2016 | The Globe and Mail | JAMES DEAN Special to The Globe and Mail

Modern central bankers worry about unemployment, income inequality, growth, inflation housing and asset bubbles, household debt, and fear of financial instability. Typically, central banks have had to rely on a single tool, their ability to raise or lower short-term interest rates. But is is an an axiom of policy making that for each additional goal, an additional instrument is necessary. Central banks worldwide agonize about their frustration with trying to target a plethora of goals.... With but a single instrument, they cannot simultaneously pursue the multiplicity of goals that today’s electorate expects of them....The answer is either to give central bankers more tools, or to co-ordinate their policy choices with those of other agencies.

For example, an ability to dictate both down payments on housing mortgages and margin requirements on borrowing to buy financial assets; setting reserve and capital requirements on banks; adjusted the lending mix of commercial bank portfolios, with preferences for export industries, or infrastructure like highways, airports and ports. Or for agriculture or labour-intensive industry or high-tech industry....The room for this kind of expanded mandate for central banks is relatively wide in some countries but very limited in others, the United States in particular.
central_banks  tools  interest_rates  Bank_of_Canada  U.S._Federal_Reserve  policy  coordination  policy_tools 
december 2016 by jerryking
Central Banks Consider Bitcoin’s Technology, if Not Bitcoin - The New York Times
By NATHANIEL POPPEROCT. 11, 2016
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central_banks  blockchain  Bitcoin 
october 2016 by jerryking
At BlackRock, a Wall Street Rock Star’s $5 Trillion Comeback - The New York Times
SEPT. 15, 2016 | NYT | By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

(1) Laurence Fink: “If you think you know everything about our business, you are kidding yourself,” he said. “The biggest question we have to answer is: ‘Are we developing the right leaders?’” “Are you,” he asked, “prepared to be one of those leaders?”

(2) BlackRock was thriving because of its focus on low-risk, low-cost funds and the all-seeing wonders of Aladdin. BlackRock sees the future of finance as being rules-based, data-driven, systematic investment styles such as exchange-traded funds, which track a variety of stock and bond indexes or adhere to a set of financial rules. Fink believes that his algorithmic driven style will, over time, grow faster than the costlier “active investing” model in which individuals, not algorithms, make stock, bond and asset allocation decisions.

Most money management firms highlight their investment returns first, and risk controls second. BlackRock has taken a reverse approach: It believes that risk analysis, such as gauging how a security will trade if interest rates go up or down, improves investment results.

(3) BlackRock, along with central banks, sovereign wealth funds — have become the new arbiters of "flow.“ It is not about the flow of securities anymore, it is about the flow of information and indications of interest.”

(4) Asset Liability and Debt and Derivatives Investment Network (Aladdin), is BlackRock's big data-mining, risk-mitigation platform/framework. Aladdin is a network of code, trades, chat, algorithms and predictive models that on any given day can highlight vulnerabilities and opportunities connected to the trillions that BlackRock firm tracks — including the portion which belongs to outside firms that pay BlackRock a fee to have access to the platform. Aladdin stress-tests how securities will respond to certain situations (e.g. a sudden rise in interest rates or what happens in the event of a political surprise, like Donald J. Trump being elected president.)

In San Francisco, a team of equity analysts deploys data analysis to study the language that CEOs use during an earnings call. Unusually bearish this quarter, compared with last? If so, maybe the stock is a sell. “We have more information than anyone,” Mr. Fink said.
systematic_approaches  ETFs  Wall_Street  BlackRock  Laurence_Fink  asset_management  traders  complacency  future  finance  Aladdin  risk-management  financiers  financial_services  central_banks  money_management  information_flows  volatility  economic_downturn  liquidity  bonds  platforms  frameworks  stress-tests  monitoring  CEOs  succession  risk-analysis  leadership  order_management_system  sovereign_wealth_funds  market_intelligence  intentionality  data_mining  collective_intelligence  risk-mitigation  rules-based  risks  asset_values  scaling  scenario-planning  databases 
september 2016 by jerryking
A Reading List of Tell-Alls, Strategic Plans and Cautionary Tales in Finance - The New York Times
JULY 4, 2016 | DEALBOOK | Andrew Ross Sorkin

(1) “Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley,” by a former Facebook executive, Antonio García Martinez.
(2) “The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability, and Avoiding the Next Collapse” by Mohamed A. El-Erian, chief economic adviser at Allianz and chairman of President Obama’s Global Development Council.
(3) “Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business” Rana Foroohar
(4) “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” Adam Grant
(5) Bloodsport: When Ruthless Dealmakers, Shrewd Ideologues, and Brawling Lawyers Toppled the Corporate Establishment” by Robert Teitelman,
(6) “Dear Chairman: Boardroom Battles and the Rise of Shareholder Activism,” by Jeff Gramm, owner and manager of the Bandera Partners hedge fund and an adjunct professor at Columbia Business School.
(7) “Brazillionaires: Wealth, Power, Decadence, and Hope in an American Country” by the journalist Alex Cuadros.
(8) a biography of Alan Greenspan titled, “The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan.” It is by the journalist Sebastian Mallaby, an adroit writer who also published a brilliant book on hedge funds several years ago, called “More Money than God: Hedge Funds and the Making of a New Elite.”
(9) “To Pixar and Beyond: My Unlikely Journey with Steve Jobs to Make Entertainment History” by Lawrence Levy, the former chief financial officer of Pixar.
Rana_Foroohar  books  booklists  summertime  Andrew_Sorkin  Pixar  Mohamed_El-Erian  hedge_funds  central_banks  finance  dealmakers  Silicon_Valley  Brazil  biographies  Adam_Grant  cautionary_tales 
july 2016 by jerryking
Bar is high for Carney on world stage
Apr. 18 2013| The Globe and Mail |CHRYSTIA FREELAND.

One of the analytical mistakes made before the financial crisis was to believe that efficient markets were perfect and that private bankers could police themselves. Refreshingly, Mr. Carney isn’t making the same error in reverse. He is a believer in regulation and has embraced it at its most complex, global, scale.

But he said regulators need to be watchful of the unintended consequences of their rules and mindful of the feedback loops between their actions and private markets. The relationship between markets and governments is a complicated process that requires eternal vigilance and constant tweaks.
Chrystia_Freeland  Mark_Carney  central_banking  central_banks  regulators  feedback_loops  unintended_consequences  world_stage 
april 2013 by jerryking
MIT Forged Activist Views, Ties of Central Bankers - WSJ.com
December 11, 2012 | WSJ | By JON HILSENRATH.

MIT Forged Activist Views of Central Bank Role and Cinched Central Bankers' Ties
MIT  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  central_banking  central_banks  Keynesian 
december 2012 by jerryking
Ride to the rescue of workers
Aug. 15 2007 | The Globe and Mail | JIM STANFORD. Economist with the Canadian Auto Workers Union

So imagine how surprised I was at the bank's rapid, powerful interventions into financial markets recently, issuing more than $4-billion in new low-cost loans in just three trading days to soothe frazzled nerves and keep the easy-credit machine out of the ditch. And it signalled in no uncertain terms there was plenty more where that came from.

Far from sitting back watching the economy "adjust to change," this drama featured the central bank as cavalry - charging over the hill just as the hedge-fund artists were making their last stand. Seems the prospect of bankrupt speculators tossed onto the street, forced to find real work, isn't the kind of change the bank has in mind. Now, don't get me wrong: What the bank did was prudent and important....This selective, one-sided approach to stabilization speaks volumes about the nature of the bank as an institution, and the biases of the inflation-targeting regime it espouses so passionately. The Bank of Canada is not a neutral, prescient team of technocrats, guiding us to some imaginary point of maximum efficiency. Like any other political body, its opinions and actions reflect value judgments about the relative importance of differing, sometimes conflicting, goals and interests. Job creation versus inflation control. Consumer inflation versus stock-market inflation. Financial troubles versus industrial troubles.

So, Governor Dodge, please carry on with your dramatic rescue mission. Just spread a little of that rescue around to the rest of us next time.
bailouts  Bank_of_Canada  biases  bubbles  business-government_relations  CAW  central_banks  economists  financial_crises  financial_markets  institutions  Jim_Stanford  layoffs  manufacturers  pairs  politics  tradeoffs  values  value_judgements 
june 2012 by jerryking
The European Union rescues Greece and Portugal
May 24, 2010 | The New Yorker | by James Surowiecki. "...The
fact is, this kind of volatility isn’t going away, because we now live
in an environment dominated by what economists call “political risk”—the
uncertainty that businesses face as a result of government actions. Of
course, government actions always affect the economy, but usually in an
undramatic way: an interest-rate cut here, a new regulation there. The
economic downturn and the debt crisis have given us instead a world
where governments are among the most important players in
markets—injecting money into economies on a colossal scale and routinely
propping up, or even nationalizing, troubled companies."
Angela_Merkel  bailouts  central_banks  debt_crisis  economic_downturn  EU  Germany  geopolitical-risk  Greece  IMF  instability  James_Surowiecki  political_risk  Portugal  sovereign-risk  uncertainty  volatility 
may 2010 by jerryking
Central Banks Are Creatures of Financial Crises
JANUARY 27, 2009 WSJ op-ed by JUSTIN LAHART provides an
overview of three centuries of central-banking history. Central banks
have been built on financial crises, with each major tremor expanding
their role. And today's economic convulsions foreshadow more changes to
come at the Fed.
backward_looking  central_banks  crisis  economics  economists  financial  financial_history  foreshadowing  institutions  U.S._Federal_Reserve  Walter_Bagehot  financial_crises 
january 2009 by jerryking

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