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jerryking : centralization   14

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.
Feb 28, 2019 | Kaieteur News | Columnists, Peeping Tom.

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.

The style of governance since political Independence has not been conducive to development. It is ill-suited for modernization. Given the expansive nature of relations and issues which governments have to address, there is a need for greater devolution of power. Centralized government can no longer cope with the multiple, overlapping and multilayered aspects of governance.......Guyana, however, is going in the opposite direction. The more modern the bureaucracy, the more swollen and overstaffed it becomes. The more complex government becomes, the more centralized is decision-making. The greater demands on resources, the bigger the bureaucracy.
The public bureaucracy is now a cancer. It is sucking the life out of public administration. Merely keeping this inefficient and revenue-guzzling monstrosity alive is costing taxpayers in excess of 500 million dollars per day. This is wanton wastage. That money could have been put to help boost private sector development to create jobs for the thousands of young people who are unemployed. The more the government implements technology, the more inefficient it becomes. It is all part of what is known as cake shop management........Guyana is going to continue to be left behind the rest of the world. It has seen Guyana retrogress and we will always be in a fire fighting mode rather than ensuring forward thinking and planning. A country today simply cannot be run like a cake shop. The world is too modern, and too many things are taking place to allow for such a style of governance. Once the policy is made by the government, the mechanics should be left to lower level officials who should be held accountable for ensuring its implementation and who should be held responsible for any failures........What is required is for faster decision-making so as to allow for the multitasking.........Plantain chips and breadfruit chips and other small businesses cannot make the economy grow. It cannot generate the massive jobs needed to impact on unemployment. It will not lift large numbers out of poverty. This is catch-hand approach to helping poor people.
Cake shop management cannot run a modern economy. Never has; never will.
bureaucracies  centralization  complexity  decision_making  devolution  Guyana  inefficiencies  modernization  policymaking  public_sector  public_servants  technology  traffic_congestion  forward-thinking  multitasking  decentralization  digital_economy  governance  knowledge_economy  centralized_control  implementation  unsophisticated 
march 2019 by jerryking
After the SNC-Lavalin affair, we must strip the influence of political staffers - The Globe and Mail
Omer Aziz was a policy adviser to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

From the outside, our government is a democracy with duly elected parliamentarians. From the inside, it can feel like an autocracy, with power concentrated in very few hands. There is a single node of power and all the channels run through it. That’s why the Prime Minister’s Office is colloquially referred to as “the Centre.”....At Global Affairs Canada, political staffers meet regularly with stakeholders, including human-rights groups, corporate representatives and anyone else who might be affected by our policies, and signals regularly came from above on how to manoeuvre on a certain file. If a message comes from “the Centre” to your office, you can bet that everyone will drop everything and make sure they are meeting expectations. Refuse, and well – these people hold your future in their hands.

It would be no stretch to say that most of the important decisions made by the Canadian government are made by only a handful of people. This has led to preventable errors and bad policy outcomes such as Justin Trudeau’s India trip or the SNC-Lavalin affair. As with too much accumulated wealth, too much accumulated power is ultimately bad for democracy.

There are more than 600 political staffers in Ottawa. These jobs are not publicly advertised and are notoriously difficult to come by if you’re not already well-connected. It’s no wonder that diversity is such a problem in government – and this includes viewpoint diversity as much as ethnic and racial diversity.

Pull back the curtain and it turns out the people in the backrooms mostly resemble one another. Within the political staff itself, there exists a hierarchy, with senior staffers in the Prime Minister’s Office at the top. This is where the real decisions are made.

We need to seriously scale back the influence of political staffers and legislate what the parameters of their jobs really are......The biggest problem with concentrating political power is that it leads to hubris and arrogance, and eventually to critical errors. It leads people to believe that they can overstep boundaries in the name of the Boss.

Absolute power not only corrupts, it is fundamentally corrupting to the entire operation. This is not how a parliamentary system of government is supposed to work. These people are not the mafia. The government does not belong to them.

We could cut the number of staffers in half and Ottawa would run better than it does now. There should also be a formal, publicly acknowledged policy process so Canadians can trust that the system of democracy is working from within and decisions that might shape the future of the country for decades are not being made by a cloistered elite.
centralization  Ottawa  PMO  political_power  SNC-Lavalin  politicians  political_staffers  Canada  Canadian  government  institutions  partisanship  GoC 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Morning Download: Computing’s Future Lies at Edge of Network, Just Before the Cloud - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Steve Rosenbush
Jun 20, 2018

For years, computing has been centralized in one place or another. First, the data center, and later massive clouds. Now, networks are taking a more decentralized structure, with power located at the so-called edge, be it a retail environment, an oil rig or an automobile. On Tuesday, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. said it will invest $4 billion during the next four years to accelerate innovation in what HPE calls “the intelligent edge.”

Edge of opportunity. “We see significant areas for growth … (as) more assets and ‘things’ come online and the amount of data generated continues to grow exponentially,” HPE CEO Antonio Neri told CIO Journal’s Sara Castellanos in an email. The number of devices connected to the internet will reach 20.4 billion by 2020, up from 8.4 billion in 2017, according to Gartner Research Inc. By 2021, 40% of enterprises will have an edge computing strategy in place, up from about 1% in 2017, Gartner says.

The payoff. Stewart Ebrat, CIO at bridal gown and fashion company Vera Wang Co., an HPE customer, maintains that with data analytics and Bluetooth-enabled beacon devices at the edge, a salesperson could know more about a prospective customer’s preferences as soon as they walk into a brick-and-mortar store. Says Mr. Ebrat: “The customer has always been number one (at Vera Wang), but technology is going to enhance that experience even further.”
cloud_computing  decentralization  edge  future  Industrial_Internet  IT  artificial_intelligence  centralization  machine_learning  HPE  HP  data_centers 
june 2018 by jerryking
The future of computing is at the edge
June 6, 2018 | FT | by Richard Waters in San Francisco.

With so much data being produced, sending it all to cloud does not make economic sense.

The economics of big data — and the machine learning algorithms that feed on it — have been a gift to the leading cloud computing companies. By drawing data-intensive tasks into their massive, centralised facilities, companies such as Amazon, Microsoft and Google have thrived by bringing down the unit costs of computing.

But artificial intelligence is also starting to feed a very different paradigm of computing. This is one that pushes more data-crunching out to the network “edge” — the name given to the many computing devices that intersect with the real world, from internet-connected cameras and smartwatches to autonomous cars. And it is fuelling a wave of new start-ups which, backers claim, represent the next significant architectural shift in computing.....Xnor.ai, an early-stage AI software start-up that raised $12m this month, is typical of this new wave. Led by Ali Farhadi, an associate professor at University of Washington, the company develops machine learning algorithms that can be run on extremely low-cost gadgets. Its image recognition software, for instance, can operate on a Raspberry Pi, a tiny computer costing just $5, designed to teach the basics of computer science......That could make it more economical to analyse data on the spot rather than shipping it to the cloud. One possible use: a large number of cheap cameras around the home with the brains to recognise visitors, or tell the difference between a burglar and a cat.

The overwhelming volume of data that will soon be generated by billions of devices such as these upends the logic of data centralisation, according to Mr Farhadi. “We like to say that the cloud is a way to scale AI, but to me it’s a roadblock to AI,” he said. “There is no cloud that can digest this much data.”

“The need for this is being driven by the mass of information being collected at the edge,” added Peter Levine, a partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz and investor in a number of “edge” start-ups. “The real expense is going to be shipping all that data back to the cloud to be processed when it doesn’t need to be.”

Other factors add to the attractions of processing data close to where it is collected. Latency — the lag that comes from sending information to a distant data centre and waiting for results to be returned — is debilitating for some applications, such as driverless cars that need to react instantly. And by processing data on the device, rather than sending it to the servers of a large cloud company, privacy is guaranteed.

Tobias Knaup, co-founder of Mesosphere, another US start-up, uses a recent computing truism to sum up the trend: “Data has gravity.”....Nor are the boundaries between cloud and edge distinct. Data collected locally is frequently needed to retrain machine learning algorithms to keep them relevant, a computing-intensive task best handled in the cloud. Companies such as Mesosphere — which raised $125m this month, taking the total to more than $250m — are betting that this will give rise to technologies that move information and applications to where they are best handled, from data centres out to the edge and vice versa...Microsoft unveiled image-recognition software that was capable of running on a local device rather than its own data centres.
Andreessen_Horowitz  artificial_intelligence  centralization  cloud_computing  computer_vision  data_centers  decentralization  edge  future  Industrial_Internet  IT  latency  low-cost  machine_learning  Microsoft  Richard_Waters 
june 2018 by jerryking
Whole Foods to Close All Three Regional Kitchens - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO and JESSE NEWMAN
Updated Jan. 25, 2017

Whole Foods Market Inc. is closing its three commercial kitchens, where it makes ready-to-eat meals for stores, including one location which received a regulatory warning about food safety violations last year.

The decision to outsource the food preparation, which was announced to employees last week, comes as Whole Foods works to cut costs by centralizing certain functions and reducing its workforce. ...to streamline operations, we have decided to leverage the expertise of our supplier network to create some of the high-quality prepared foods sold in our stores...Supermarkets across the sector are offering more prepared meals, with some even opening sushi restaurants and wine bars inside their stores. Fresh prepared foods generated $15 billion in sales in supermarkets in 2005, a figure that has nearly doubled to about $28 billion last year, according to Technomic, a food industry research firm.

But the explosion of prepared meals has brought new food-safety issues.
Whole_Foods  grocery  commercial_kitchens  supermarkets  food_safety  product_recalls  Outsourcing  prepared_meals  FDA  centralization  high-quality 
january 2017 by jerryking
Where Value Lives in a Networked World
Mohanbir SawhneyDeval Parikh
FROM THE JANUARY 2001 ISSUE

In recent years, it seems as though the only constant in business has been upheaval...Business has become so complex that trying to predict what lies ahead is futile. Plotting strategy is a fool’s game. The best you can do is become as flexible and hope you’ll be able to ride out the disruption.
There’s some truth in that view…..We have studied the upheavals and concluded that many of them have a common root--the nature of intelligence in networks. The digitization of information, combined with advances in computing and communications, has fundamentally changed how all networks operate, human as well as technological, and that change is having profound consequences for the way work is done and value is created throughout the economy. Network intelligence is the Rosetta Stone. Being able to decipher it will shape the future of business.

Four Strategies for Profiting from Intelligence Migration

Arbitrage.
Because intelligence can be located anywhere on a network, there are often opportunities for moving particular types of intelligence to new regions or countries where the cost of maintaining the intelligence is lower. Such an arbitrage strategy is particularly useful for people-intensive services that can be delivered over a network, because labor costs tend to vary dramatically across geographies.

Aggregation.
As intelligence decouples, companies have the opportunity to combine formerly isolated pools of dedicated infrastructure intelligence into a large pool of shared infrastructure that can be provided over a network.

Rewiring.
The mobilization of intelligence allows organizations to more tightly coordinate processes with many participants. In essence, this strategy involves creating an information network that all participants connect to and establishing an information exchange standard that allows them to communicate.

Reassembly.
Another new kind of intermediary creates value by aggregating, reorganizing, and configuring disparate pieces of intelligence into coherent, personalized packages for customers.
arbitrage  centralization  collective_intelligence  decentralization  digitalization  disruption  flexibility  HBR  networks  network_power  resilience  taxonomy  turbulence  turmoil  uncertainty  value_creation 
november 2015 by jerryking
Kill the Messengers: Stephen Harper and how our elected leaders meddle with the media - The Globe and Mail
CHRIS HANNAY
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 30 2015

Title Kill the Messengers: Stephen Harper’s Assault on Your Right to Know
Author Mark Bourrie
Genre Non-Fiction
Publisher Patrick Crean Editions
Pages 386
Price $32.99
Year 2014
PMO  Stephen_Harper  centralization  government  propoganda  books 
february 2015 by jerryking
John Turner: a great defender of Parliament - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 06 2012,

But June 18 will be more than just an occasion to reminisce, as Mr. Turner is expected to expand on his brief remarks at a recent Public Policy Forum dinner where he was scathing about the state of Canada's Parliament.

He lamented the centralization of power in the Prime Minister's Office, and the erosion of the importance and independence of standing committees "that used to be a real element of democracy in the House of Commons." He condemned the Conservative's omnibus budget bill, reminding the audience that "the budget used to be related to taxation," and arguing the government's strategy is to hamper debate. He also cited the inheritance of Magna Carta, the charter of liberties, that a ruler's will is not arbitrary, and that the privileges of parliamentarians need to be protected.

"What we have in this country didn't happen by accident, democracy doesn't happen by accident," said Mr. Turner. "Let's fight for the restoration of the supremacy of Parliament in our democratic life."

It was more than partisanship, it was a heart-felt defence of Canada's parliamentary democracy by a great Canadian parliamentarian. June 18 promises to be interesting.
anniversaries  centralization  democracy  editorials  House_of_Commons  John_Turner  Magna_Carta  Parliament  parliamentary_democracy  partisanship  PMO  arbitrariness 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Crossroads Nation - NYTimes.com
Nov. 8, 2010 By DAVID BROOKS. What sort of country will
America be in 2030 or 2050? Nobody has defined America’s coming
economic identity. ....We’re living in an information age. Innovation
and creativity are the engines of economic growth. ...Creativity is not a
solitary process. It happens within netwks. It happens when talented
people get together, when idea systems and mentalities merge....."In
2009, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dir. policy planning at the State Dept.,
wrote an essay , “America’s Edge.”" for Foreign Affairs in which she
laid out the logic of this new situation: “In a networked world, the
issue is no longer relative power, but centrality in an increasingly
dense global web.” the U.S. is well situated to be the crossroads
nation. It is well situated to be the center of global ntwks and to
nurture the right kinds of ntwks Building that US means doing everything
possible to thicken connections: finance research; improve
infrastructure; fix immigration; reform taxes;
R&D  infrastructure  immigration  creativity  future  David_Brooks  networks  soft_power  U.S.foreign_policy  synchronization  orchestration  centralization  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  network_density  network_power  op_ed 
november 2010 by jerryking
What Can A Corporate U Do For You?
Jul 2006.Training | Vol. 43, Iss. 7; pg. 34, 5 pgs | Margery Weinstein
corporate_universities  Freshbooks  centralization  decentralization 
november 2009 by jerryking
IKON Office Solutions
Oct 2008 | T + D.: Vol. 62, Iss. 10; pg. 70, 1 pgs | by
Anonymous. The pendulum that swings between centralized and
decentralized training rests comfortably in the middle at IKON Office
Solutions Inc., Article references LMS, the Kirkpatrick evaluation model
IKON  corporate_universities  centralization  decentralization  Freshbooks  LMS  assessments_&_evaluations 
november 2009 by jerryking

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