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jerryking : champions   8

Why modern chess needs an injection of old-fashioned thrills
NOVEMBER 30, 2018 | Financial Times | A K Thomson.

The recent chess world championships Fabiano Caruana, the creative and dynamic Italian-American player, was the first US-born grandmaster to reach a world championship final since Fischer’s 1972 victory and Magnus Carlsen, the cool and clinical Norwegian who has sat at the top of the chess world for the best part of a decade, were a dud.

The multi-game match, played in London over nearly three weeks, lurched, sputtered and then fizzled out as the players, locked in concentration for hours at a time, produced draw after draw — 12 of them in total. This was not the content chess organizers wanted or needed in their efforts to promote the game to a wider audience.….Russian Alexander Grischuk, one of the top 10 players in the world, described the majority of the match as “three weeks of boredom”. If chess were still a backwater pursuit, as it has been for much of its 1,500-year history, none of this would matter. But, in the digital era, the sport has become more accessible and popular than ever before. Once the preserve of Europeans and Russians, who had a monopoly on the latest theory in books and pamphlets, chess in the 21st century has taken hold in India, China, Iran and dozens of other countries without a long-playing tradition. Millions of people join millions of games online every day. Chess.com, one of many popular sites, hosts about 3.5m games played daily by its 27m registered users in more than 140 countries. Nearly all of those games use a so-called blitz or bullet format, where players have just a few minutes — and sometimes less than 60 seconds — to make all of their moves. In chess, speed equals thrills. Like gamers, the world’s best bullet players use special mouses: click speed and accuracy have become part of the modern game. Sites offer as standard a “pre-move” feature that allows a player to gain time by committing to his or her next move before their opponent has even decided what to play. Against that backdrop, this week’s turgid world championship was an advertisement against long time controls.
19th_century  champions  chess  speed 
december 2018 by jerryking
Pamela Joyner: collector of ‘Afropolitan abstraction’
SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | FT| by Julie Belcove.

.....Joyner and Giuffrida are not merely acquisitive in the vein of so many collectors but are activist. “We think of ourselves as stewards of their careers,” Joyner says of their artists. “Our philanthropy is focused on getting works of the artists who we support into museums....Joyner and Guiffrida donate paintings to leading museums in the UK and the US. Joyner introduces those museum curators to talented-but-lesser-known artists for whom she advocates. She also organizes trips domestically and internationally (.e.g South Africa) for museum curators....Joyner and Guiffrida created an artist’s residency on their property in Sonoma, California, in 2014.....Artists return the loyalty and remark that Joyner and Guiffrida never ask for a discount....Joyner has made collecting — and sitting on boards — her primary occupation. “Now I have a strategy, I have a budget,” she says. “I run it like you’d expect an MBA to run it.”...“Race is a really bad lens through which to view art. I could make an argument that Zander Blom is far more African than I am.”....“I was really struck by these artists who were determined to create an aesthetic that was compelling to them, which was abstraction, and there were no rewards for that if you were an African-American artist at the time,” Joyner says. “The traditional art world expected African-American artists to create identifiably black subject matter. ....The daughter of two public school teachers, Joyner, 58, grew up on the South Side of Chicago, where she attended the prestigious University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and frequented the Art Institute of Chicago. A serious ballet dancer, Joyner took a year off from Dartmouth College to try to break into the professional ranks in New York. “What I discovered was, I was really average,” she says frankly. “That was a good thing to discover early. I decided at that juncture that I would become a patron of the arts.”

Patronage requires money, so Joyner went on to Harvard Business School, then a successful career in finance.....With 300 to 400 artworks by roughly 100 artists, among them contemporary masters Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kara Walker, the collection is the subject of a new book, Four Generations: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art, written by a Who’s Who of top curators. In October 2017, a travelling exhibition of the collection’s highlights will open at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
art  collectors  women  African-Americans  curators  Diaspora  artists  museums  philanthropy  marginalization  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  Afropolitan  activism  race  HBS  abstractions  books  stewardship  Pamela_Joyner  contemporary_art  champions 
october 2016 by jerryking
Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
Champions of Change: Identifying, Understanding, and Supporting Champions of Technological Innovations - ProQuest
Summer 1990 | Organizational Dynamics | Christopher Higgins & Jane Howell.

This article presents the results of 25 interviews of personnel managers who were able to promote changes in business organizations through different methods of human resource management. Extremely high self-confidence, persistence, energy, and risk taking are the hallmark personality characteristics of champions. Champions show extraordinary confidence in themselves and their mission. They are motivated by a passionate belief, and enthusiasm about, the nature of the technology and what it can do for the company. Related to their self-confidence is the champions' capacity to cling tenaciously to their ideas and to persist in promoting them despite frequent obstacles and seemingly imminent failures. By actively promoting their ideas, often by repeating the same arguments over and over, champions overcome the opposition. Inexhaustible energy the unflagging vitality, is also a salient characteristic of champions. In many cases, champions willingly risk their position and prestige to ensure the innovation's success. Interestingly, while champions claim to be risk takers, many of them psychologically minimize the amount of personal risk associated with their involvement in the innovation.
Ivey  change  change_management  champions  ProQuest  leadership  personality_types/traits  change_agents  eels  personal_risk  self-confidence  mission-driven 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Young & Restless of Technology Finance
November 1993| The Red Herring | Anthony B. Perkins.

We think that marketing is everything. We try to help our companies figure out what is going to set them apart. We encourage companies to define their biggest risks-up front, work hard to put the risks behind them, and then move forward with very innovative marketing...During the interview process, you see whether entrepreneurs have passion and tenacity. The hardest thing to determine is their ability to stick-to-it. Entrepreneurs need to be very dynamic, wi11ing to adjust. And that's why an important part of our process is checking references, we have to be convinced the entrepreneur has never give up, even when things get tough. In other words, when Plan A work, because Plan A never works, we like to hear entrepreneurs say "That's O.K.,Plan B is on its way. I've twisted this valve and turned this knob and I really think we've figured it out." What we don't like to hear is "Well,it didn't work out...sorry." We also like to see entrepreneurs who are singularly focused on building -great products that fill distinct market needs. We are less interested in people who like nice digs, hype,and PR.

Moritz: ‘We have a very tight on making sure there is a sizable market opportunity in front. of us before we make an investment. We are much more focused on market growth potential and the ability for a company to reach a market successfully and profitably. We have also demonstrated as a firm and individually the ability to get companies off the ground with a small amount of fuel. We like to start wicked infernos with a single match rather than two million gallons of kerosene. This is clearly a differentiated way of getting a company put together. This approach has terrific benefits for the people who start the companies and for all our limited partners. You might say that we have a morbid fascination with our ROI, as opposed no the amount of dollars we put to work. And this is a very different message than you get from a lot of other venture firms.
The: HERRING: How often does a Sequoia partner actually go in and help operate a company?

Moritz: Pierre is the great unsung hero of Cisco Systems. He spent a tremendous amount of time at the company. working behind the scenes helping to make sure the engineering department was designing and getting new products to market. People don't realize the significant contribution Pierre made to Cisco because Don's name is on the hubcaps as the chairman of the company. The ability we have to help operate companies is a useful tool in our arsenal.

The HERRING: Sequoia's image on the streets of Silicon Valley is that you are the Los Angeles Raiders of venture capital--the tough guys who are quicker than the other firms to boot the CEO or pull the financial plug.
Moritz: We are congenitally incapable of pouring good money after bad. Some people. for their own will thrust us into a position to be harbingers of bad new to management, which is all right. But we do not want to continue propping up a company if we think its chances for success have evaporated. We would be wasting our money as individuals and wasting the money of our limited partners. There have been very few instances where we decided to stop funding a company and have regretted it.
The HERRING: What ’s the hardest part of your job?
Moritz: We usually don't make mistakes when it comes to assessing market opportunity. And we are reasonably accurate in predicting how long it will take to bring a product to market. The great imponderable is to judge accurately and predict how well a president is going to be able to run the business. It is easy to mistake the facade for reality
The HERRING: ‘What characteristics does Sequoia look for in a company president?
Moritz: Frugality, competitiveness. confidence, and paranoia.
venture_capital  vc  howto  Kleiner_Perkins  Sequoia  career_paths  Michael_Moritz  no_regrets  endurance  frugality  competitiveness  paranoia  self-confidence  market_sizing  market_windows  team_risk  market_opportunities  ambitions  large_markets  sticktoitiveness  entrepreneur  perseverance  indispensable  Plan_B  off-plan  champions  reference-checking  unknowns  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  unsentimental  wishful_thinking  illusions  overambitious 
july 2012 by jerryking
Who gets the money: 'aggressive, hungry and paranoid' - The Globe and Mail
MARK EVANS | Columnist profile
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Friday, Mar. 02, 2012

there is financing available for “aggressive, hungry and paranoid” entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The problem is that there aren’t enough of those kinds of entrepreneurs in Canada....“Venture capital is made for people who are very ambitious, people who want to make a dent in the world, eat someone’s lunch, and want to disrupt someone’s business. That attitude, we don’t have enough of in Canada.”
iNovia  venture_capital  vc  entrepreneur  change_agents  disruption  mindsets  paranoia  ambitions  Mark_Evans  aggressive  frugality  pitches  thinking_big  champions  competitiveness  self-confidence  overambitious  staying_hungry  torchbearers 
march 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: And from the Russian judge...
More good stuff from Seth Godin. Sticking to it to get a task
done! When VC firms look for entrepreneurs on whom to risk their money,
they aren't searching for a great idea, or even great credentials. No,
what they're searching for is this: the certainty that the person who
brings them a business idea is going to carry the torch for that idea as
long as it takes, that the idea will get passed on, and that the
business will make it across the finish line-- torchbearers.
Torchbearers are people with that rare skill, the ability to dig deep
when the need arises -- to get past the short-term pain and to pull off
an act that few would have believed possible.
Seth_Godin  perseverance  indispensable  leadership  torchbearers  entrepreneur  venture_capital  vc  grit  certainty  character_traits  champions  overambitious 
september 2007 by jerryking

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