recentpopularlog in

jerryking : character_traits   33

Opinion | Mike Pompeo: Last in His Class at West Point in Integrity
Nov. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Thomas L. Friedman

....Pompeo has just violated one of the cardinal rules of American military ethics and command: You look out for your soldiers, you don’t leave your wounded on the battlefield and you certainly don’t stand mute when you know a junior officer is being railroaded by a more senior commander, if not outright shot in her back.........Pompeo instead let his ambassador to Ukraine — who depended on him for protection — be stabbed in her back with a Twitter knife, wielded by the president, rather than tell Trump: “Sorry, Mr. President, if you fire her, I will resign. Because to do otherwise would be unjust and against my values and character — and because I would lose the loyalty of all my diplomats if I silently went along with such a travesty of justice against a distinguished 33-year veteran of the foreign service.”............“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, but lose his soul?” — Mark 8:36......As two now retired, longtime State Department diplomats, Aaron David Miller and Richard Sokolsky, wrote on CNN.com on Saturday, “At the very least, Pompeo enabled the smear campaign to go unchallenged, acquiesced in the Giuliani back-channel effort with Ukraine and failed to say a word in defense of Bill Taylor, George Kent or Marie Yovanovitch. These are breathtaking acts of craven political cowardice and beneath the dignity of any secretary of state.”

Mike Pompeo: Last in his class at West Point on ethics in leadership.........Reporters and columnists need to ask Pompeo every chance they get: “What moral code are you operating by that would justify such behavior?’’.....it’s now clear that Pompeo had not taken an oath to defend and protect the Constitution. He took an oath to defend and protect Donald J. Trump and Pompeo’s own future political career — above all else — and that’s exactly what he’s been doing. Shame on him.
character_traits  conspiracies  cowardice  diplomacy  disinformation  Donald_Trump  ethics  integrity  leadership  Michael_Pompeo  political_expediency  scriptures  Tom_Friedman  Ukraine  U.S._State_Department  U.S.foreign_policy  values  West_Point 
november 2019 by jerryking
Winners in Silicon Valley put in the hard yards
October 24, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Michael Moritz 6 HOURS AGO

The genuine formula for success among Silicon Valley's "real companies" are longevity and persistence against all odds. It is no coincidence that the greatest companies to emerge from Silicon Valley and its sister regions in China share hallmarks that are very different from popular perception. These companies are never “overnight sensations”, and they have usually had plenty of close encounters of the worst kind.

Their founders will not be leading the lifestyles of the rich and famous. Instead, they will be strapped to the mast displaying single-minded devotion to their business, jealous of every minute that is not associated with the welfare and sustenance of their company.

Their reading lists will be long; they will be voracious in their willingness to learn from others; harbour insatiable curiosity; display a fetching mixture of supreme confidence and humility; and have a keen understanding of how to make the impossible possible.

They will also adopt healthy corporate habits in their early days, have a sound appreciation for how their company will become profitable and refuse to pursue a strategy for growth come what may. They will pay keen attention to unit economics, operating expenses, cash balances, positive cash flows and dilution. The founders of the flagship technology companies of the past 50 years — Intel, Cisco, Qualcomm, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple, Oracle, Alibaba and Tencent — have all shared these traits and that is true for today’s best privately held companies.......In the technology world, fatuous slogans, broken promises, unlaced basketball shoes and black turtlenecks can only get you so far. It is then that the absence of a sound business model suddenly becomes evident. It is then that heaps of protective voting rights melt away. It is then that people understand gravity has not been repealed and that patience is the best way to build what you want. That’s the life of the persistent majority.
business_models  character_traits  dotcom  founders  hard_work  illusions  Juul  ksfs  longevity  Michael_Moritz  persistence  Silicon_Valley  reading  Sequoia  single-minded_focus  start_ups  WeWork 
october 2019 by jerryking
What meeting Bernie Madoff taught me about our inability to read others
October 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by Gillian Tett.

Books:
Talking to Strangers, by Malcolm Gladwell.
The Human Swarm, by Mark Moffett.

Malcolm Gladwell, the writer, earned fame — and fortune — by producing books such as The Tipping Point (2000) that popularised human psychology. In his new study, Talking to Strangers, he looks at our propensity to misread other people. It is an increasingly pressing question for our polarised, fake-news era.

How should we interpret the signals we receive from others? This matters when it comes to detecting fraud, of course......It also matters in other ways. Today more than ever, we all suffer if we misread the signals we receive from different social groups. It is human nature to assume our own culture is the definition of “normal”, and to use this lens when we view others.....even traits that we assume are ­“universal”, such as [jck: visual cues] facial expressions, can vary hugely between cultures — and, of course, within societies that speak the same language.

Gladwell describes, for example, how social interactions between black and white communities in America are regularly marred by misunderstandings, with tragic consequences. “[This] is what happens when a society does not know how to talk to strangers,” he concludes.......Moffett then advances two broader points. First, he argues that humans (like ants) need a sense of tribal identity and belonging, with specialisations clearly defined; but, second, he insists that the way humans develop this tribal identity is crucially different from other animals.

Among some species, such as chimpanzees, trust only emerges through face-to-face contact between individuals in small groups; in others, creatures only co-operate if they can be instantly identified as coming from the same species. Ants kill anything that smells different.....what is amazing about humans – albeit rarely celebrated – is how we generally tolerate outsiders ­without instantly needing to kill them.

“Being comfortable around unfamiliar members of our society gave humans advantages from the get-go and made nations possible,” Moffett writes. “Chimpanzees need to know everybody [to ­tolerate them]. Ants need to know nobody. Humans only need to know somebody [for society to function.]” This achievement deserves far more attention, since it only works in two conditions. First, humans must feel secure in their own group (which they signal with symbols and rituals); second, “strangers” can only be smoothly absorbed if everyone learns to read different symbols too....If we want to “talk to strangers”, we need to teach our kids (and ourselves) to try to look at the world through strangers’ eyes – even if we must also recognise that we will never truly succeed.
assumptions  Bernard_Madoff  books  character_traits  cultural_identity  deception  Gillian_Tett  misinterpretations  psychopaths  signals  strangers  tribes  group_identity  lying  Malcolm_Gladwell  misjudgement  psychology  trustworthiness  visual_cues  writers 
october 2019 by jerryking
Where Power Stops, by David Runciman
September 2, 2019 | Financial Times Review by Giles Wilkes.

Where Power Stops: The Making and Unmaking of Presidents and Prime Ministers, by David Runciman, Profile, £14.99
biographies  books  book_reviews  character_traits  iconoclastic  impotence  leaders  political_biographies  political_power 
september 2019 by jerryking
What would Plato make of Boris Johnson?
June 22nd 2019 | the Economist | by Bagehot.

Classics (Literae Humaniores) is a wide-ranging degree devoted to the study of the literature, history, philosophy, languages and archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. It is one of the most interdisciplinary of all degrees, and offers the opportunity to study these two foundational ancient civilisations and their reception in modern times. The degree also permits students to take extensive options in modern philosophy......

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Mr Johnson’s failure to get a first continues to annoy him intensely—and to delight many of his rivals. But in truth it doesn’t matter a jot: the world is full of failures who got firsts, and successes who missed out. The really interesting question is not whether Mr Johnson’s results reveal some great intellectual weakness. It is what light the subject of his studies can throw on his qualifications to be prime minister. The classics corpus is full of meditations on the qualities that make for a good leader. And no classical author thought more profoundly about the subject than Plato, the philosopher who was put at the heart of Oxford’s classics syllabus by Balliol’s greatest master, Benjamin Jowett. What would Plato have made of the classicist who appears destined to be Balliol’s fourth prime minister since 1900?.....In “The Republic”, Plato argued that the most important qualities in a statesman were truthfulness and expertise. A good statesman will “never willingly tolerate an untruth”. (“Is it possible to combine in the same character a love of wisdom and a love of falsehood?” one of Plato’s characters asks. “Quite impossible,” comes the reply.) He will spend his life studying everything that he needs to make him a good captain of the ship of state—“the seasons of the year, the sky, the stars, the winds and other professional subjects”. .......By contrast, Plato argued, the surest signs of a bad leader are narcissism and self-indulgence. The poor statesman is an eloquent flatterer, who relies on his ability to entertain the masses with speeches and comic turns, but doesn’t bother to develop a coherent view of the world. Plato was particularly vitriolic about the scions of the upper classes who are offered the opportunity to study philosophy while young but don’t apply themselves, because they think they are so talented that they needn’t earn their place at the top table.......“The Republic” is haunted by the fear that democracies eventually degenerate into tyrannies. Democracy is the most alluring form of government: “the diversity of its characters, like the different colours in a patterned dress, make it look very attractive.” But it is inherently unstable. Citizens are so consumed by pleasure-seeking that they beggar the economy; so hostile to authority that they ignore the advice of experts; and so committed to liberty that they lose any common purpose......As democracies collapse under the pressure of their contradictions, panicked citizens look for salvation in a demagogue. These are men who love power, but cannot control their own desires for “holidays and dinners and parties and girlfriends and so on”. Plato calls them the “most wretched of men because of the disorder raging within them”. Citizens are so consumed by fear that they think these wretches have magical abilities to solve the country’s problems and restore proper order. Demagogues get their start by “taking over a particularly obedient mob”, before seizing control of the country. But the more power they acquire the worse things become, “for the doctor removes the poison and leaves the healthy elements in the body, while the tyrant does the opposite.”

The shadow on the wall
Democracies have proved more durable than Plato imagined. And his cure for the problems of democracy—the rule of philosopher-kings, who are expected to hold their wives and children in common—is eccentric to put it mildly. But he is right that character matters. Politicians can change their advisers or their policies, but character is sticky. He is also right that democracies can suddenly give way to populist authoritarianism...... The best way to prepare for a Johnson premiership is to re-read “The Republic”, hoping Plato is wrong but preparing for the fact that he may be right
Boris_Johnson  character_traits  contradictions  demagoguery  democracies  Greek  humanities  leaders  leadership  liberal_arts  opposing_actions  Oxford  pairs  philosophers  Plato  politicians  Romans  statesmen  truth-telling  United_Kingdom 
july 2019 by jerryking
Artificial intelligence and jobs: What’s left for humanity will require uniquely human skills - The Globe and Mail
July 27, 2018 |CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL by STEVE WOODS.

Where should we look for this final archipelago of human employment? The best place to start is deep within ourselves. As much as we pride ourselves on advanced skills such as mathematics and chess, humans are not born innately aware of algebra or checkmate. We are, instead, a social species. We are born innately aware of others, their reactions to us and our relationships with them. Removing a person from a social environment is so harmful that it is deemed to be a form of torture and is banned by the Geneva Convention.

When we attempt to use machines to replace the role of humans in our social lives, the response is immediate and negative......we, as a society and as a species, don’t want AI to replace our social interactions and our relationships. It’s a part of what makes us human and it’s a part that we intend to keep.....areas where we don’t desire AI replacement: relationships, trust, guidance, caring, nurturing and social interaction are traits that these post-AI jobs will share.
artificial_intelligence  automation  relationships  emotions  emotional_intelligence  empathy  EQ  humanity  creative_destruction  Joseph_Schumpeter  character_traits  AlphaGo  IBM_Watson 
july 2018 by jerryking
The Happy Hooker Conservatives
OCT. 26, 2017 | The New York Times | Bret Stephens.

So where are Benda’s conservative disciples today, the ones I remember from panel discussions on the importance of moral character, the dangers of relativism, or the post-modern assault on the concept of truth?.It’s instructive to read the high-minded defenses of Trump offered by writers in Breitbart, The Washington Times, The Federalist, and the rest of the pro-Trump press..Their chief argument for Trump is that he won and is therefore a winner. Their argument against Never Trumpers is that we failed and are therefore losers. What about Trump’s character? It doesn’t matter so long as the Supreme Court remains conservative. Legislative failures are always and only the fault of “establishment Republicans.” Boorish habits are merely a matter of taste and something of a virtue in the era of snowflakes. As for the criticisms from Flake, Bush, Corker and McCain, who needs moral instruction from those sore losers and political has-beens?...Most telling is the Trumpians’ inability ever to utter a whisper of criticism of their man. Even Never Trumpers will occasionally find themselves agreeing with the administration over one issue or another. Not so the Trumpians. With instincts that recall the Stalinist intelligentsia of the 1940s, they mix the logical elasticity of the sophist with the unflinching loyalty of the toady. They are never anything except always all in.

All this suggests that what the media now trumpets as a looming G.O.P. civil war isn’t going to happen. Corker and Flake aren’t stepping up; they’re bowing out. Political retirees are good for leading charities, not movements.
Bret_Stephens  Donald_Trump  GOP  conservatism  character_traits  values  debased  high-minded 
october 2017 by jerryking
What Does It Take to Climb Up the Ladder? - The New York Times
Thomas B. Edsall MARCH 23, 2017

What drives success? Cognitive skills are important, but so are harder-to-measure strengths that fall under the heading of what is sometimes called character......In a 2014 paper, “The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence,” Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution, and two co-authors, Kimberly Howard and Joanna Venator, focus on what they call “performance character strengths” and the crucial role played by noncognitive skills in educational attainment, employment and earned income. These character strengths — “perseverance, industriousness, grit, resilience, curiosity, application” and “self-control, future orientation, self-discipline, impulse control, delay of gratification” — make significant contributions to success in adulthood and upward mobility.

As the accompanying chart demonstrates, upper-income kids perform well on tests of noncognitive skills, but there are substantial numbers of low-income children who do well also.
movingonup  social_mobility  perseverance  industriousness  grit  resilience  curiosity  hard_work  self-control  forward_looking  self-discipline  impulse_control  delayed_gratification  character_traits  up-and-comers 
march 2017 by jerryking
Recharging the Canadian right - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 18, 2016

As Henry Kissinger once observed, politicians in office use up their intellectual, human and organizational capital rather than adding to it. Time out of office, wisely employed, can be used to restock the cupboard....

.....This is not to say that personal attractiveness and communications capabilities should be ignored in the recruitment of the next generation of political leaders. But if the aim of conservatives is not only to recharge the right politically, but also to be better able to govern the country as a result, putting all the renewal eggs in the charismatic leader basket would be a mistake for both conservatism and the country....
1. Greater recognition of the character traits that Canadians want to see in their elected officials – openness, honesty, transparency, integrity, compassion, humility – and making the possession of such traits a much more important factor in recruiting candidates, leaders and staff.

2. More clearly embracing those Canadian values – such as freedom, responsibility, equality of opportunity, stewardship, respect for life, democratic accountability – that conservatives want to strengthen and apply more rigorously to public policy.

3. Continue to strongly communicate the importance of trade liberalization, public-spending constraints, balanced budgets, debt reduction and tax relief.

4. Undertake a fresh round of policy development to strengthen the creative application of conservative values and principles to those areas where conservatives are, rightly or wrongly, seen to be weak or disinterested, such as poverty, inequality, health care, education, environment, science and culture.

5. Investing heavily in training conservative-oriented Canadians for more effective participation in the country’s political processes; providing more and better training for volunteers, constituency executives, campaign managers and candidates.

6. With respect to all of the above, consulting and involving ordinary Canadians at every stage – not just party insiders and elites.
Preston_Manning  conservatism  revitalization  intellectual_capital  human_capital  constituencies  rebuilding  think_tanks  political_infrastructure  institutions  politicians  institution-building  right-of-center  Canadian  values  training  Henry_Kissinger  organizational_capital  renewal  character_traits  charisma  APNSA  right-wing 
january 2016 by jerryking
Successful people act quickly when things go wrong - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Aug. 02, 2015

Productivity

Pivot quickly to maximize success
Airplanes are off course 90 per cent of the time but incessantly correct their direction, . Similarly, successful people correct their course quickly when off-kilter. They also set short timelines, have small daily to-do lists and drop stuff that isn’t working. Lifehack.org

Branding

Learn from but don’t live in the past
It’s great to know your company history but senseless to live in the past,Your company’s history is valuable only if customers and prospective clients believe it defines your brand and success, and differentiates you from competitors. If it doesn’t, build a new history.

Leadership

Pre-empt attacks with regular audits
To pre-empt an activist investor’s attack, eliminate financial and operational underperformance. Conduct regular vulnerability audits, looking at factors such as how earnings per share, profit and price-to-earnings ratios in the past 18 months compare with peers. If necessary, create an aggressive turnaround plan. ChiefExecutive.net

Human resources

Ask potential hires where they’ll go next
It sounds weird, but LinkedIn asks potential employees what job they want to have next after they leave the company. Founder Reid Hoffman says it signals the intent to have a huge impact on the individual’s career, helping to develop them for whatever they choose, and invites honesty. Vox.com

Tech tip

Use phone’s camera as portable copier
Productivity blogger Mark Shead recommends using your phone’s camera as a portable copy machine/scanner when on the road, photographing paperwork, train schedules or other information. Many new camera phones have the resolution to provide readable copies. Productivity 501.com
branding  productivity  human_resources  leadership  Harvey_Schachter  character_traits  habits  pre-emption  course_correction  Reid_Hoffman  career_paths  beforemath  overachievers  affirmations  pivots  audits  signals  vulnerabilities  hiring  interviews  high-achieving 
august 2015 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google | LinkedIn
Gary BurnisonInfluencer
Chief Executive Officer at Korn/Ferry International
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google
March 13, 2014

learning agility is the leading predictor of success – No. 1 above intelligence and education.

While Friedman reported on one company, I am writing to tell you that learning agility will get you a job anywhere – from Walmart to Twitter, to Google, to Facebook, to GM, to Tata, to L’Oreal and more.

And, in today’s workplace, jobs and job responsibilities change quickly. So, the key to retaining a job and growing in your career is learning agility.

The Peter Principle, which asserts that employees will continue to get promoted until they reach their highest level of incompetence, has evolved. Today employees don’t need to get promoted to become incompetent. They will become incompetent in their current jobs if they don’t grow, adapt, and evolve.

If you stop growing and learning, your job will outgrow you. If you grow and learn faster than your job, employers will always want you.

The other thing that Friedman did not tell you is that the “learning agile” uncover new challenges, solicit direct feedback, self-reflect, and find ways to get jobs done resourcefully. They see unique patterns and make fresh connections that others overlook.

A Korn Ferry study of sales managers bears this out: The higher an individual’s learning agility, the more promotions he or she received during a 10-year period. Similarly, longitudinal studies observed that managers who modified their behaviors, exhibited flexibility, and accepted mistakes as part of learning new competencies, were more successful than their counterparts as they climbed the corporate ladder.

There are five factors to Learning Agility: mental agility, self-awareness, people agility, change agility, and results agility.

The net-net is that most successful executives are able to move out of their comfort zone, take risks, learn from mistakes, and begin anew as they encounter new assignments. The successful leaders continually learn, bend, and flex as their work world changed.
LinkedIn  Korn_Ferry  Google  Tom_Friedman  hiring  character_traits  learning  learning_curves  learning_journeys  learning_agility  mental_dexterity  self-awareness 
march 2014 by jerryking
Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid
11/18/2013| - Forbes| Cheryl Conner, Contributor

For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and health, when it comes down to it, mental strength can mean even more. Particularly for entrepreneurs, numerous articles talk about critical characteristics of mental strength—tenacity, “grit,” optimism, and an unfailing ability as Forbes contributor David Williams says, to “fail up.”...we can also define mental strength by identifying the things mentally strong individuals don’t do.
1. Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves.
2. Give Away Their Power.
3. Shy Away from Change.
4. Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control.

5. Worry About Pleasing Others.
6. Fear Taking Calculated Risks.
7. Dwell on the Past.
8. Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over.
9. Resent Other People’s Success.
10. Give Up After Failure.
11. Fear Alone Time.
12. Feel the World Owes Them Anything.
13. Expect Immediate Results.
grit  resilience  personality_types/traits  character_traits  habits  inspiration  beyond_one's_control  affirmations  overachievers  span_of_control  high-achieving 
december 2013 by jerryking
Finding Strength in Humility - NYTimes.com
November 15, 2013 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ

When we identify with a particular strength, the opposite we’re avoiding is almost always negative. For confidence, it’s insecurity or self-doubt. But what happens when we overuse confidence? It turns into arrogance, hubris and even grandiosity. Any strength overused eventually becomes toxic. Excessive honesty becomes cruelty. Tenacity congeals into rigidity. Bias for action can overwhelm thoughtful reflection.

This is where positive opposites serve as a balancing and humanizing role. Humility comes from the Latin word “humilis,” which literally means “low.” It resides just a stone’s throw from “humiliation.” Sure enough, excessive humility eventually softens into obsequiousness and self-subjugation. False humility is even worse: a conscious manipulation covertly aimed at winning praise, often to compensate for unacknowledged feelings of inadequacy.

But genuine humility is a reflection of neither weakness nor insecurity. Instead, it implies a respectful appreciation of the strengths of others, a lack of personal pretension and a more relaxed sense of confidence that doesn’t require external recognition.

In a complex world that so plainly and painfully defies easy answers, humility is also an antidote to overconfidence. It gives leaders permission to accept and acknowledge their limitations, to learn from them and continue to grow and evolve.....I don’t need to say out loud that I value confidence and strength. I do need to demonstrate that I also value humility and vulnerability – to embrace these opposites. In the end, the less time we spend protecting our own value, the more time we can spend creating value in the world.
Managing_Your_Career  humility  opposing_actions  personality_types/traits  character_traits  strengths  contemplation  reflections  pairs  overconfidence  dual-consciousness  self-doubt  arrogance  hubris  grandiosity  confidence  insecurity  honesty  cruelty  tenacity  rigidity  toxic_behaviors 
november 2013 by jerryking
Five traits of smart risk takers
March 13, 2013 | G&M | Harvey Schachter.

Review of Taking Smart Risks by Doug Sundheim. Sundheim lists five common dangers of playing it safe for too long:

• You don’t win.
• You don’t grow.
• You don’t create.
• You lose confidence as you lose momentum and start to freeze up.
• You don’t feel alive, because you aren't challenging yourself.
Harvey_Schachter  risks  risk-taking  books  book_reviews  soul-enriching  personality_types/traits  growth  cost_of_inaction  character_traits  complacency  risk-aversion  risk-avoidance  playing_it_safe 
march 2013 by jerryking
All I Want for Christmas Is... A Little Space
December 14, 2012 | WSJ| By SOPHIA DEMBLING.
All I Want for Christmas Is... A Little Space
Forget religion and politics. The real holiday war is between social butterflies and wallflowers
Christmas  personality_types/traits  character_traits 
december 2012 by jerryking
Inside the Minds of the Perfectionists - WSJ.com
October 29, 2012 | WSJ | Melinda Beck

Inside the Minds of the Perfectionists
Researchers Used to Blame Parenting but Studies Suggest a Genetic Link; Procrastination is a Problem
Melinda_Beck  personality_types/traits  character_traits 
october 2012 by jerryking
Five key traits of successful consultants - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Monday, Sep. 24 2012,

Intellectual Capacity

You have to be smart, well-trained and experienced – and have the educational credentials to back you up, be it an MBA or specialized training in your specific field of focus. “Competition for management consultants is likely to remain keen, and those with the most education and experience will have the best prospects,” she writes. Maturity and lots of contacts from a long career can be helpful; younger individuals have youth on their side but should expand their portfolio through as many varied experiences as possible.

Self-Confidence

You must be strong and confident about your abilities, but also low maintenance, ego in check. Although a hired hand for the organizations you work with, you must be a leader, motivating others and working in a collaborative way to nudge clients to solutions they might not have reached on their own.

Moxie

You need courage, energy, vision – and spunk. “It is the capacity to go against the common view, to walk into a room of fractious stakeholders who don’t support the evaluation and don’t want to hear about the findings. It is the ability to land in a strange town at midnight, scrape the snow and ice off your rental car, and locate your motel without the benefit of a map. It is being able to get up the day after you have lost the best proposal you have ever written and start all over again,” she notes.

Adaptability

Your work is defined by the rigid parameters set out by proposals and contracts, but you must still be light on your feet as you operate with the whole world in a state of flux. Try to keep your proposals more open-ended to handle unexpected issues that will inevitably crop up as you progress with your work.

Endurance

Some people enter the field viewing it as a stopgap between paid employment, while others view consulting as offering independence that will be a welcome relief to the stultifying atmosphere in the organizations where they have worked.
ksfs  Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  self-confidence  personality_types/traits  character_traits  chutzpah  endurance  adaptability  individual_initiative  open-ended 
october 2012 by jerryking
What Makes a Top Executive?
1983 | Psychology Today | by Morgan W.McCall, Jr. and Michael M. Lombardo.
Executives, like the rest of us, are a patchwork of strengths and weaknesses....The fatal flaws of executives who failed to live up to their potential.

1. Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating style.
2. Cold, aloof, arrogant
3. Betrayal of Trust—failure to meet commitments.
4. Overly ambitious—plays politics, pushes too hard to get ahead.
5. Failure to handle specific performance problems—failure to handle problems then not admit the problem, try to cover up or shift blame.
6. Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team.
7. Unable to select and develop an effective staff.
8. Unable to think broadly or strategically—too much attention to detail and minor technical problems.
9. Unable to adapt to a boss with a different style.
10. Overdependence on one’s boss or mentor.

These flaws matter because:
1. Strengths become weaknesses
2. Deficiencies eventually matter
3. Success goes to their heads
4. Events conspire

Part of handling adversity lies in knowing what not to do. Know which behavioural patterns will colleagues and superiors consider intolerable...Seek diversity in the forms of success.
executive_management  CEOs  movingonup  career_ending_moves  leadership  listening  Myers-Briggs  managing_people  EQ  Managing_Your_Career  personality_types/traits  leadership_development  character_traits  strengths  weaknesses  people_skills 
july 2012 by jerryking
"Portrait of a perfect salesman."
3 May 2012| Financial Times | Philip Delves Broughton.

Tips for closing any deal

Know the odds

Most salespeople face far more rejection than acceptance. Knowing how many calls or meetings it takes to make each sale helps develop the positive attitude vital to succeed. After all, 99 rejections may be just the prelude to that triumphant yes.

Find a selling environment that suits you

Some people are great seducers, others dogged persuaders. Some like to make lots of sales each day, others prefer making one a year. Some enjoy high financial incentives, others thrive on the human relationships. Decide who you are first, then find a sales role that suits your personality type.

Be your customer's partner not their adversary

Great salespeople create value around products and services that they can convey and deliver to their customers. Paying attention and acting in the interests of your customer rather than yourself is very difficult. But as information about price and features becomes more widely available, service and relationships become the real value in each sale.
sales  selling  Philip_Delves_Broughton  Salesforce  character_traits  personality_types/traits  customer_centricity  ratios  partnerships  relationships  rejections  salesmanship  salespeople  success_rates  customer_focus  pay_attention  positive_thinking  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2012 by jerryking
Parenting Advice for Type A Parents Raising Type B Children - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 19, 2011 | WSJ | By SUE SHELLENBARGER.

Ambitious Parents, Mellow Children
Driven Type A's Often Struggle To Raise Type B Kids
personality_types/traits  parenting  children  fatherhood  advice  character_traits 
november 2011 by jerryking
Grace under firing
August 13, 2011 | globeadvisor.com | by AARON SCHAT. As
Tiger Woods' former caddy discovered, losing your job can be a real test
of character. How not to make a bad situation worse:

How you handle difficult life circumstances - such as being fired -
reveals your character. This does not mean that you should blithely
accept being mistreated. Indeed, anger is an appropriate reaction to
experiencing or witnessing mistreatment. Nor does this mean that you
should avoid criticizing people or processes that are unfair. But this
can be done with venom or grace, malice or dignity. You are responsible
for how you respond.
(1) Never bad mouth an ex-employer.
(2) Reflect and learn
(3) Find fresh motivation
(4) Make the best of the crisis.
bouncing_back  character_traits  emotional_mastery  etiquette  firings  golf  grace  Managing_Your_Career  mistreatment  resilience  silver_linings  Tiger_Woods  values 
august 2011 by jerryking
Judgment Trumps Experience - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 29, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By WARREN BENNIS and NOEL TICHY.

judgment is the core, the nucleus of exemplary leadership. With good judgment, little else matters. Without it, nothing else matters........Leadership is, at its marrow, the chronicle of judgment calls. These will inevitably write the leader's legacy.....not discounting the importance of experience. Seminal and appropriate experiences must be drawn on and understood before judgments can be informed. But experience is no guarantee of good judgment. There is a huge difference between 20 yrs. of experience that advances one's learning and one year of experience repeated 20 times.........there are numerous times when past experiences can prevent wise judgments. Barbara Tuchman long ago observed how generals tend to fight the last war, refusing to face new realities, almost always with disastrous consequences. And often, especially in today's dizzying world, we need to understand what Zen Buddhists call the "beginner's mind," which recognizes the value of fresh insight unfettered by experience. ........Judgment isn't quite an unnatural act, but it also doesn't come naturally. And speaking from decades of experience, we're not sure how to teach it. (We know it can be learned.) Wisely processed experience, reflection, valid sources of timely information, an openness to the unbidden and character are critical components of judgment as well. As David McCullough reminds us over and over again, "Character counts in the presidency more than any other single quality."
Barbara_Tuchman  character_traits  experience  fresh_eyes  Hillary_Clinton  judgment  leaders  leadership  Obama  Noel_Tichy  Warren_Bennis 
january 2009 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: And from the Russian judge...
More good stuff from Seth Godin. Sticking to it to get a task
done! When VC firms look for entrepreneurs on whom to risk their money,
they aren't searching for a great idea, or even great credentials. No,
what they're searching for is this: the certainty that the person who
brings them a business idea is going to carry the torch for that idea as
long as it takes, that the idea will get passed on, and that the
business will make it across the finish line-- torchbearers.
Torchbearers are people with that rare skill, the ability to dig deep
when the need arises -- to get past the short-term pain and to pull off
an act that few would have believed possible.
Seth_Godin  perseverance  indispensable  leadership  torchbearers  entrepreneur  venture_capital  vc  grit  certainty  character_traits  champions  overambitious 
september 2007 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read