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jerryking : chefs   20

Momofuku’s Secret Sauce: A 30-Year-Old C.E.O.
Aug. 16, 2019 | The New York Times | By Elizabeth G. Dunn.

Momofuku was founded in 2004, with an East Village ramen bar that, after some initial stumbles, wowed diners by combining pristine ingredients and impeccable technique in humble dishes that melded influences from Japan to Korea to the American south. Since then, it has become a private-equity backed company with restaurants from Sydney to Los Angeles; a growing chain of fast-casual chicken sandwich shops; a media production unit churning out television shows and podcasts; and designs on creating a line of sauces and seasonings that could capture supermarket aisles across America. While Mr. Chang is the brand’s lodestar, Ms. Mariscal, 30, is the executive who makes it all work.

Born and raised on the Upper West Side, to the family that founded the specialty foods emporium Zabar’s, Ms. Mariscal began her career at Momofuku in 2011, as a public relations and events intern. Over the years, she quietly became Mr. Chang’s closest collaborator and confidante, a largely unknown force shaping matters as varied as menu design, branding and business development. “She’s the only person I’ve ever felt comfortable giving complete carte blanche to, in terms of what Momofuku looks like and what it should be,” Mr. Chang said. He recalled suggesting to the company’s board that Ms. Mariscal be named C.E.O. almost four years ago, when she was 26. She finally assumed the role in April.

It’s not unusual for a chef like Mr. Chang to parlay cooking talent and charisma into restaurants, cookbooks and television shows — a formula pioneered by the likes of Emeril Lagasse, Bobby Flay and Rick Bayless in the 1990s. But chef-driven food brands of the scope and ambition that Mr. Chang and Ms. Mariscal envision for Momofuku, with dozens of locations and mainstream packaged food products, are harder to pull off.

Adding to the challenge is Momofuku’s particular identity, which revolves less around a distinct culinary tradition than an attitude of restless innovation, boundary pushing and spontaneity. A formulaic chain of steakhouses, Momofuku ain’t. Scaling that ethos requires a tightrope act: Create enough structure and continuity to stave off chaos, without destroying the brand’s animating spirit in the process.
Asian  brands  branding  business_development  CEOs  chefs  commercial_kitchens  David_Cheng  detail_oriented  differentiation  diversification  food  founders  fusion  growth  high-standards  interns  investors  kitchens  leadership  Momofuku  organizational_structure  restauranteurs  restaurants  scaling  special_sauce  women  workaholic 
august 2019 by jerryking
How to Organize Your Kitchen Like a Professional Chef
April 3, 2019 | The New York Times | By Janelle Zara.

“Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,” by chef Samin Nosrat focuses on those four elements as the pillars of flavor.

An exacting standard of organization......is what keeps fast-paced kitchens running smoothly. “When you have a place for everything, you don’t have to think twice,” she says, because there’s no searching for what you need. “It’s about not having to do the extra work.”....... organize your the cabinets, pantry and drawers in the kitchen — because, “just throwing things in a drawer is selling yourself short.”

All cookware should fall under the four pillars of “prep, cook, serve, store,” and should be divided accordingly. Drawers marked “PREP” includes tools like mixing bowls, mortar and pestle, a scale and a measuring glass, while the “COOK” drawer is full of pots and pans. Items for serving — plates, bowls and glasses — are in the cupboard, her resealable containers are all stacked in a drawer of their own, and never shall the four ever meet.

Sort by flavor and function

“Knowing there’s a zone for everything makes it easier to just go and find,” says Bennett, whose refrigerator contents have been grouped based on flavor profile and function: Asian sauces, American sauces, fruits, vegetables and pickled things each have a designated section. On the countertop, she keeps what she calls her “flavor station,” a reliable wooden bowl stocked with shallots, garlic and red onions. “They’re the raw materials,” she says, “the all-around the basics of good flavor.

Date and label

With all these identical containers, knowing what’s inside and when you bought it is essential. There are, however, no label makers here. “In a professional kitchen, everything is labeled with painters tape,” Bennett says, “but chalkboard paint with a chalkboard pen looks nice, and it’s also easier to read.”

Keep everything in plain sight

Bennett hates the guessing game of pulling knives out of a butcher block to see which is which. She prefers to keep them in a drawer or on a magnetic strip mounted to the wall. “It’s all about visibility and making it easily accessible,” she says. On the same note, she transfers her dry goods to labeled, transparent plastic or glass containers from Restaurant Depot or the Container Store so that she can always see what’s inside, a trick she learned from doing restaurant inventory.

Keep your gadgets to a minimum

The tools in your kitchen don’t need to spark joy, but you should toss the things you never use, no single-utility items.

Don’t keep all your eggs in one basket

Separating like items into different trays and baskets makes them easier to grab on the go: All of Bennett’s vitamins and medicine bottles are in one tray in the fridge; her utensils are divided up by open rectangular boxes in drawers;

Keep shopping bags in the car
That way you’ll never forget to bring them to the market.

Store essentials close at hand
“Counter space is precious real estate,” (jk: finite_resources ) says Bennett, so only the truly necessary basics get to stay there.
books  chefs  fast-paced  finite_resources  GTD  howto  kitchens  self-discipline  self-organization 
april 2019 by jerryking
The rise of chef ‘supergroups’ means more creative and experimental kitchens across the country - The Globe and Mail
Behind the restaurant’s unassuming façade is a powerhouse of some of Canada’s most talented and successful restaurateurs. The team behind the Joe Beef empire, Frédéric Morin, David McMillan, Allison Cunningham, as well as Marc-Olivier Frappier and Vanya Filipovic (Mon Lapin, Vin Papillon), Chris Morgan and James Simpkins (Liverpool House) have teamed up with chef Derek Dammann (Maison Publique) to create a kind of culinary supergroup – the Traveling Wilburys of rotisserie chicken......Somewhat counterintuitively, then, comradery, and perhaps a survivors' bond over having made it in an industry known to chew cooks up and spit them out, is bringing chefs together. McKiernan is just one example of chefs partnering with their would-be competitors to open places where the whole is, hopefully, greater than the sum of its parts......
chefs  collaboration  restaurants  restauranteurs  kitchens  cold_storage  commercial_kitchens  experimentation 
november 2018 by jerryking
Anh Nguy: Research Is Her Recipe - The New York Times
ocations
As told to PATRICIA R. OLSEN

Q. What do you do as a culinologist for Ingredion?

A. Culinology is a fusion of culinary arts and food science. Culinologists typically create food concepts for food companies and restaurants that end up on store shelves and menus. We are also known as research chefs. People come to Ingredion for the ingredients we manufacture, like starches, texturizers and sweeteners, or to collaborate on a product. I work on both types of projects in our professional test kitchen, and I also give presentations to potential customers. I’ll ask them if they want natural ingredients, a gluten-free product and so forth.
commercial_kitchens  food  career_paths  research  OPMA  foodservice  flavours  food_science  recipes  manufacturers  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  chefs 
november 2015 by jerryking
Anthony Bourdain’s Food Market Takes Shape - The New York Times
By FLORENCE FABRICANTSEPT. 28, 2015

New York has had an explosion of megamarkets and food halls over the last five years, but this one promises to be different for several reasons, starting with its epic size: 155,000 square feet, dwarfing the city’s other food markets. The project’s ambition and risks are formidable, most notably the task of securing visas for scores of small overseas vendors, then transporting and housing them here.

“It’s going to involve a lot of visas, a big challenge,” Mr. Werther said.

Still, some question whether the city, with its wealth of recent immigrants, and their foods, needs to import new options.
chefs  restaurants  New_York_City  Anthony_Bourdain  real_estate  entrepreneur  farmers'_markets  personal_branding  food  gourmands  communal 
september 2015 by jerryking
Chef Michael Bonacini’s five top tips for success
COURTNEY SHEA
Published Sunday, Mar. 16 2014
Keep your eye on the oven

In terms of the mistakes I see from the contestants on Masterchef Canada, the most common thing is that a cook will lose focus. When you’re in the kitchen, this is the most important thing and it’s that much harder because of the competition and the cameras. It’s so easy to let your mind wander for a second and all of a sudden you’re heading off in three or four different directions. Focus is what will allow you to stick to a vision and hopefully deliver a good product. T
Pay to be picky [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
Peter [Oliver] and I get a lot of offers to do restaurants – a new build, taking over an existing establishment, a hotel. The first question we ask ourselves is, does it fit the brand? The landlord, the building, the location – do all of these things align with who we are and where we want to go? Then there are the business aspects. What is the rent? What are the build-out costs? There are so many checkpoints that we go through. Eight times out of 10, it’s a pretty quick no. Being very discerning about the projects we get involved with has allowed us to maintain our reputation for so many years.
Lots in a name
Don’t be a rose-tinted restaurateur
Consistent is better than cool
brands  checklists  chefs  consistency  discernment  entrepreneur  focus  ksfs  monotasking  personal_branding  questions  reputation  restaurants  restauranteurs  say_"no"  selectivity  tips 
march 2014 by jerryking
Changing The Recipe Of A Signature Dish Can Be A Risk
March 2010 | QSR magazine | | By Daniel P. Smith.

remaking a signature dish is risky business. Who can forget the consumer backlash Coca-Cola encountered when it altered its recipe in 1985, reverting to its original formula after less than three months on the market with New Coke?

“Changing a signature recipe is a dangerous proposition because there’s risk involved,” says Mark Smith, a research and equity analyst for investment firm Feltl and Company who focuses specifically on restaurants. “Will franchisees be on board with the change? Will this change alienate heavy users?”
fast-food  innovation  chefs  menus  recipes  Domino's  foodservice  risks  QSR 
april 2013 by jerryking
Welcome to the Steam Age - WSJ.com
November 23, 2012 | WSJ By CHARLES PHAN.
A celebrated San Francisco chef makes a case for a cooking method too often written off as suspiciously wholesome.
fish  recipes  chefs  Vietnamese  steamed 
april 2013 by jerryking
Where Food's Headed Ñext - WSJ.com
February 15, 2013 | WSJ | By GEORGE SEMLER.

At this year's Madrid Fusión summit, the world's chefs came together again to forecast our culinary future
food  future  restauranteurs  chefs 
april 2013 by jerryking
Kraft calls on star chefs to capture immigrant market - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 12, 2011 |G&M | WENCY LEUNG. Major North American food
companies have been expanding their overseas mkts. for decades. But
targeting ethnic consumers on home turf is still relatively uncharted
territory. Industry analysts say that’s changing, as shifting
demographics in Canada force mainstream food companies to recognize new
growth opportunities among domestic minority groups. Last yr, Campbell
Canada launched a new line of halal-certified soups to cater to a
growing population of Muslim Canadians. This past February, the
country’s largest grocer, Loblaw, appointed a new president with
extensive knowledge of Asian markets. Following Loblaw’s 2009 purchase
of Asian supermarket chain T&T, the company’s appointment of Vicente
Trius as president underscores its intention to attract diverse
customers.As Loblaw exec. chair. Galen Weston said at the appointment,
Mr. Trius “has an understanding of Asian retail, South Asian retail and
what constitutes a great way to grab those customers.”
Kraft  ethnic_communities  immigrants  Loblaws  demographic_changes  uncharted_problems  food  retailers  product_launches  chefs 
april 2011 by jerryking
Book Excerpt: Ferran: The Inside Story of El Bulli and the Man Who Reinvented Food -
September 2, 2010 | BusinessWeek | by Ferran Adrià. An excerpt
from a book by renown chef, Adrià, credited with revolutionizing modern
cooking through the development of widely copied "scientific"
techniques (e.g. spherification). Adrià now seeks to understand the
physical & chemical principles on which his art is based, and to
share that understanding with colleagues. Adrià has invested the
proceeds of his celebrity in the creation of new ideas about food. The
Harvard collaboration is not a new direction—it's the continuation of a
career spent in rigorous pursuit of innovation. A good deal of the work
goes on not in the kitchen at El Bulli but in a Barcelona workshop
(elBulli Taller), where the art and science of Ferran Adrià undergo
constant reinvention. There, chefs are required to keep extensive and
detailed records of everything they do, the failures as well as the
successes—on paper and with digital cameras.
chefs  food  reinvention  restaurants  restauranteurs  Harvard  innovation  inspiration  creativity  Ferran_Adrià  gourmands  books  El_Bulli  digital_cameras 
september 2010 by jerryking

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