recentpopularlog in

jerryking : civility   18

The absolute need to raise all standards - Stabroek News
By IAN MCDONALD November 27, 2016

the determination to give a proper account of your stewardship, the satisfaction obtained in doing a job meticulously and well and on time, a concern to maintain high standards of service, accountability and professionalism. Any society should hope that such attitudes never become out of date.
Guyanese  Guyana  detail_oriented  quality  stewardship  civility  standards  on-time 
december 2016 by jerryking
Civility at Work Helps Everyone Get Ahead - WSJ
By CHRISTINE PORATH
Updated Nov. 23, 2016

Trust is key in any relationship. In the workplace today, we spend over 8 hours per day with our fellow co-workers. Trust builds relationships, and enables true collaboration and teamwork. Without trust, nothing works well.
civility  co-workers  incivility  relationships  trustworthiness  workplaces 
november 2016 by jerryking
What Ben Franklin Could Teach Us About Civility and Politics - WSJ
By STEVEN C. BULLOCK
Nov. 7, 2016

As Ben Franklin once said: "We must all hang together or assuredly we shall all hang separately.
Benjamin_Franklin  Founding_Fathers  politeness  civility  humility  politics  quotes 
november 2016 by jerryking
On campus, it’s good to be bothered by a diversity of ideas - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Sep. 05, 2016

consider the advice U.S. President Barack Obama gave last spring to the graduating class of Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C.

“Don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them,” Mr. Obama said in May. “There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice. But listen. Engage. If the other side has a point, learn from them. If they’re wrong, rebut them. Teach them. Beat them on the battlefield of ideas. And you might as well start practising now, because one thing I can guarantee you, you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks … at every stage of your life.”

Better yet, students should, in Prof. Levinovitz’s words, see university as a “boot camp, not a hotel.” You’re there to toughen up for real life, not shield yourself from its infuriating injustices, painful conflicts and, yes, even the Donald Trumps of this world. Because they’re everywhere.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  ideas  intellectual_exploration  political_correctness  censorship  political_orthodoxy  free_speech  hate_speech  safe_spaces  civility  polarization  intellectual_diversity  disagreements  argumentation  heterogeneity  core_values 
september 2016 by jerryking
The importance of being courteous: Why she is touting it to young women
Jul. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | LEAH MCLAREN.

Institutional achievement and politeness should not be mutually exclusive, but both are essential for young people to find fulfilling work and relationships later in life. ...Raising well-behaved children well should be a significant civic duty.

Manners, which an increasing number of parents dismiss as old-fashioned, actually matter more than ever before. As Reardon pointed out in her speech, this is not about “using the right spoon for soup or eating asparagus with your left hand” but the importance of “being polite and respectful and making the people you interact with feel valued.”

Such deep internal values must be impressed upon children from the outside in. When it comes to character we must fake it in childhood to make it as adults. Am I implying that teaching a child to simply say, “Excuse me,” before interrupting can lead to a successful career and a happy marriage later in life? Yes, absolutely.

In the digital era, when kids are communicating through a coded vortex of social media and smartphone screens rather than face to face, it’s especially important for parents to invest time and energy to impart social rules for how to communicate properly with other humans in the flesh....The thing about manners is that they are actually much more time-consuming to instill in your children than, say, teaching them to play the cello or speak fluent Mandarin. That’s because most parents will naturally outsource the latter two skills (unless they happen to be Chinese cellists) whereas good manners require tireless, everyday, hands-on effort. Take “please” and “thank you” – by far the most superficial of all our accepted behavioural etiquette constructs. To teach a child to say these things consistently and without prompting, the average parent must correct that child several dozen times a day from the time they are initially verbal until about 5 or 6. On average, that’s more than 100,000 verbal cues until a child actually gets it. Your pet goldfish learns tricks faster than that. And that’s not even counting the thousands of mandatory apologies, forced thank-you-notes and supervised household chores. Raising a well-mannered kid is a slog, and no babysitter, tutor or fancy private school is going to do it for you
parenting  etiquette  civics  commencement  high_schools  Leah_McLaren  courtesies  civility  students  women  girls  youth  verbal_cues 
july 2014 by jerryking
Here’s my list of the most obnoxious Torontonians - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 13 2014

Amy Alkon, the American author of a new book with the cute title Good Manners for Nice People who Sometimes Say F*ck, says it is inevitable in a busy urban environment.

"We can behave badly when we are around strangers, and we're around strangers almost all the time," "This allows people to do stuff they would never do to a neighbour. The guy that's flipping you the bird in traffic is counting on the fact that he's never going to see you again."

Rude people in cities somehow persuade themselves that all those other people around them simply don't exist – or, at least, don't merit bothering about.

These rude people are self-declared islands in the urban sea, pursuing their self-interest and supremely indifferent to the effects on the rest of us.The road hog cyclist was like that, but there are many others like him.........Most people follow the simple rules of urban etiquette that keep the modern metropolis functioning, even when there is no one around to enforce them.

Most dog owners pick up after their pets with plastic bags, a relatively new practice, simply because it is expected. Most city dwellers who aren't the mayor still experience shame......Amy Alkon is off base. Most of us don't feel we can behave badly around strangers. When that guy rammed me with his bike, everyone getting off the streetcar and passing by on the street knew he was in the wrong. Even as he bombed off through the intersection, I'm sure he felt it. It is that collective judgment that we fear and, by and large, respect.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  civics  courtesies  etiquette  civility  humility  public_decorum  anonymity 
june 2014 by jerryking
Jeffrey Simpson: Would it hurt our PMs to respect each other? - The Globe and Mail
May. 04 2013 | Globe & Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON

Those with a taste for Canadian history should read Sir Wilfrid Laurier’s eulogy to Sir John A. Macdonald. Their parties had fought ferociously over big issues, and the partisanship of their day was ubiquitous. But great men seek public occasions to display respect to each other and, in so doing, invite their fellow citizens to respect the institutions of democracy.
Canadian  history  eulogies  Jeffrey_Simpson  civility  partisan_warfare  etiquette  post-partisanship  Jean_Chrétien  Brian_Mulroney  Pierre_Trudeau  courtesies  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Sir_Wilfred_Laurier  leaders  politicians  nation_builders  Confederation 
may 2013 by jerryking
So you drop an F-bomb in your Oscar speech. Now what? - The Globe and Mail
A word that used for shock value purposes, but it no longer
shocks anyone...it just comes across as common and desperate for
attention. If you want to really shock people - use good grammer, be
eloquent, be succinct and be brilliant. Oh, and say something we haven't
heard a million times already!
commentators  letters_to_the_editor  languages  civility  profanity 
february 2011 by jerryking
Surviving the Age of Humiliation - WSJ.com
MAY 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JEFFREY ZASLOW.

THE BEST DEFENSE

* Expect the worst. If you run a business, assume disgruntled employees will make accusations about you. If you're a teacher, expect to be badmouthed by angry students on RateMyProfessors.com. If you've endured a hostile divorce, keep your guard up, and be ready to mop up spilled secrets.
* Get up to speed. You may be written about on blogs, Twitter and other social-networking sites. Learn exactly how new media sites work, who uses them and how you can be adept at it, too
* Reframe the discussion. Actor Alec Baldwin wrote that he felt great shame, and even thought of suicide, after an angry voicemail message he left for his 11-year-old daughter went viral. He eventually channeled his feelings into a book about fathers' rights and divorce, which allowed him to explain his outburst and weigh in on the debate over custody issues
* Have thick skin. Ignore efforts to hurt you on obscure blogs or websites, as these often dissipate on their own. As for cyber-bullying of children, parents tend to overreact—calling other parents over minor incidents, making things even harder for their kids at school—or under-react, not responding to serious incidents. It's best to tell kids: "Together we'll find the right way to deal with this—to help you and not make things worse.
* Fight back. Thomas Jefferson believed that the best way to combat critical speech was to speak out yourself. Start your own blog or post your own comments. If it's vital that you defend yourself, do so forcefully, without fear and with self-confidence.
personal_branding  reputation  etiquette  civility  public_decorum  popular_culture  Jeffrey_Zaslow  humility  reframing  humiliation  problem_framing  serious_incidents  Thomas_Jefferson  worst-case  thinking_tragically 
may 2010 by jerryking
Crovitz: Is Internet Civility an Oxymoron? - WSJ.com
APRIL 19, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By L. GORDON
CROVITZ. Unmoderated, anonymous comments on Web sites create more noise
than wisdom. "For those of us tempted to hope that new technology
might improve human nature, the Web has proved a disappointment. The
latest online reality: comment sections so uncivilized and uninformative
that it's clear the free flow of anonymous comments has become way too
much of a good thing."..."The hope was that people would be civil.
Instead, many comment areas have become wastelands of attacks and
insults."...Part of the problem is that people who conceal their names
seem to feel free to say things they never would if their identities
were known. There are obvious cases—dissidents living in authoritarian
countries—where anonymity is needed. But ... message boards dominated by
anonymous comments often become "havens for a level of crudity,
bigotry, meanness and plain nastiness that shocks the tattered remnants
of our propriety."
L._Gordon_Crovtiz  civility  internet  commentators  anonymity  courtesies  incivility  disappointment 
may 2010 by jerryking
The Rebirth of Civility - WSJ.com
April 12, 2007 op-ed by Daniel Henniger on the merits of a code of conduct for bloggers.
Web_2.0  civility  Daniel_Henninger  courtesies 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read