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jerryking : clusters   19

This Thriving City—and Many Others—Could Soon Be Disrupted by Robots - WSJ
Feb. 9, 2019 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

In and around the city of Lakeland, Florida you’ll find operations from Amazon, DHL (for Ikea), Walmart , Rooms to Go, Medline and Publix, a huge Geico call center, the world’s largest wine-and-spirits distribution warehouse and local factories that produce natural and artificial flavors and, of all things, glitter.

Yet a recent report by the Brookings Institution, based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau and McKinsey & Co., argues that the economic good times for Lakeland could rapidly come to an end. Brookings placed it third on its list of metros that are most at risk of losing jobs because of the very same automation and artificial intelligence that make its factories, warehouses and offices so productive......As technology drives people out of the middle class, economists say, it’s pushing them in one of two directions. Those with the right skills or education graduate into a new technological elite. Everyone else falls into the ranks of the “precariat”—the precariously employed, a workforce in low-wage jobs with few benefits or protections, where roles change frequently as technology transforms the nature of work......One step in Southern Glazer’s warehouse still requires a significant number of low-skill workers: the final “pick” station where individual bottles are moved from bins to shipping containers. This machine-assisted, human-accomplished step is common to high-tech warehouses of every kind, whether they’re operated by Amazon or Alibaba. Which means that for millions of warehouse workers across the globe, the one thing standing between them and technological unemployment is their manual dexterity, not their minds.... “I think there will be a time when we have a ‘lights out’ warehouse, and cases will come in off trucks and nobody sees them again until they’re ready to be shipped to the customer,” says Mr. Flanary. “The technology is there. It’s just not quite cost-effective yet.”
artificial_intelligence  automation  Christopher_Mims  disruption  distribution_centres  Florida  manual_dexterity  precarious  productivity  robotics  warehouses  cities  clusters  geographic_concentration  hyper-concentrations 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Rise of Global, Superstar Firms, Sectors and Cities - CIO Journal.
Jan 18, 2019 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

Scale increases a platform’s value. The more products or services a platform offers, the more consumers it will attract, helping it then attract more offerings, which in turn brings in more consumers, which then makes the platform even more valuable. Moreover, the larger the network, the more data available to customize offerings and better match supply and demand, further increasing the platform’s value. The result is that a small number of companies have become category kings dominating the rest of their competitors in their particular markets.

Network dynamics also apply to metropolitan areas. For the past few decades, the demands for high-skill jobs have significantly expanded, with the earnings of the college educated workers needed to fill such jobs rising steadily. Talent has become the linchpin asset of the knowledge economy, making capital highly dependent on talented experts to navigate our increasingly complex business environment.

“Just as the economy confers disproportionate rewards to superstar talent, superstar cities… similarly tower above the rest,” wrote urban studies professor and author Richard Florida. “They are not just the places where the most ambitious and most talented people want to be - they are where such people feel they need to be.”
cities  clusters  geographic_concentration  hyper-concentrations  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  knowledge_economy  network_effects  platforms  Richard_Florida  start_ups  superstars  talent  winner-take-all 
january 2019 by jerryking
Where You Should Move to Make the Most Money: America’s Superstar Cities - WSJ
By Christopher Mims
Dec. 15, 2018 12:00 a.m. ET
Technology is creating an economy in which superstar employees work for superstar firms that gather them into superstar cities, leading to a stark geographic concentration of wealth unlike any seen in the past century.

The latest example of this is Apple announcing this past week a billion-dollar investment in a new campus that could ultimately accommodate up to 15,000 employees in a city already red hot with talent (Austin, Texas).....When economists talk about “superstar” anything, they’re referencing a phenomenon first described in the early 1980s. It began as the product of mass media and was put into overdrive by the internet. In an age when the reach of everything we make is greater than ever, members of an elite class of bankers, chief executives, programmers, Instagram influencers and just about anyone with in-demand technical skills have seen their incomes grow far faster than those of the middle class.

In this winner-take-all economy, the superstar firms—think Apple, Google and Amazon, but also their increasingly high-tech equivalents in finance, health care and every other industry—appear to account for most of the divergence in productivity and profits between companies in the U.S.

As firms cluster around talent, and talent is in turn drawn to those firms, the result is a self-reinforcing trend toward ever-richer, ever-costlier metro areas that are economically dominant over the rest of the country.
Christopher_Mims  cities  clusters  geographic_concentration  geographic_inequality  hyper-concentrations  start_ups  superstars  winner-take-all  disproportionality  digitalization 
december 2018 by jerryking
Southern Ontario should be an innovation cluster, not a farm team - The Globe and Mail
PATRICK DEANE, MERIC GERTLER AND FERIDUN HAMDULLAHPUR
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 28, 2015
industrial_policies  uToronto  uWaterloo  innovation  Ontario  clusters  Kitchener-Waterloo 
december 2015 by jerryking
Anh Nguy: Research Is Her Recipe - The New York Times
ocations
As told to PATRICIA R. OLSEN

Q. What do you do as a culinologist for Ingredion?

A. Culinology is a fusion of culinary arts and food science. Culinologists typically create food concepts for food companies and restaurants that end up on store shelves and menus. We are also known as research chefs. People come to Ingredion for the ingredients we manufacture, like starches, texturizers and sweeteners, or to collaborate on a product. I work on both types of projects in our professional test kitchen, and I also give presentations to potential customers. I’ll ask them if they want natural ingredients, a gluten-free product and so forth.
commercial_kitchens  food  career_paths  research  OPMA  foodservice  flavours  food_science  recipes  manufacturers  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  chefs 
november 2015 by jerryking
Tyler Cowen on inequality, Canada, and the state of global superpowers
Eva Salinas | May 1, 2015.

Tyler Cowen is an economist, academic and writer. His popular blog, Marginal Revolution, co-written with Alex Tabarrok, a colleague at George Mason University, turned Cowen into “an economics celebrity,” in the words of one LA Times writer. More recently, Cowen and Tabarrok ventured into the world of online education with their creation of Marginal Revolution University in 2012.
The author of ‘Average is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation’ was in Toronto earlier this year as the keynote speaker at the University of Toronto’s conference on Inequality.
Tyler_Cowen  economists  income_inequality  Canada  innovation  Silicon_Valley  averages  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  economic_stagnation  clusters  polymaths  the_Great_Decoupling 
may 2015 by jerryking
15 INNOVATIVE WAYS (BIG AND SMALL) TO INNOVATE
February 22, 2013 | Report on Business Magazine| by Dawn Calleja, Shane Dingman, Tavia Grant, Jessica Leeder, Iain Marlow and Nathan VanderKlippe
innovation  Tavia_Grant  Iain_Marlow  Cisco  Pebble  root_cause  second-order  questions  clusters  large_companies  brands 
february 2013 by jerryking
Canada's food producers relish taste of success
Sep. 06 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by TAVIA GRANT

Toronto - now the second-largest food producer in North America after Chicago - has developed a comprehensive food plan. In May, Ontario unveiled a food-cluster strategy that aims to attract global investment and promote Canadian products overseas. This fall, the province will open an institute of food-processing technology that will eventually host 500 full-time students. The Conference Board is working on a national framework for the food industry and the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute is also working on policy.

It's a promising source of employment. Making a chicken nugget or pre-made Caesar salad, for example, typically needs more people than making a car part. Wages also tend to be higher - jobs in the industry yield wages that are on average 25 per cent higher than the national average, the industry says.

Food-innovation centres are springing up across Canada with government and university backing, from Charlottetown's smart kitchen to Burnaby's agri-food centre. They frequently function as labs that bridge researchers, students and the private sector.

Guelph's food-technology centre is used by companies such as Italpasta Ltd. and McCain Foods to test out new ideas and combine new types of ingredients. One room, a cross between a giant kitchen and mad-science lab, tests new types of cheeses and ice creams.

The centre also helps companies identify new trends. Karen McPhee, manager of product-development services, rattles off several shifts: sodium-reduced food, gluten-free products and simpler, more natural ingredients. Food is being viewed as medicine, she says, with more products that promise Omega 3s, antioxidants or probiotics.

The sector faces its share of headwinds. Like other manufacturers, a strong currency and volatile energy prices are causing headaches, and it has smaller economies of scale than many counterparts.
Tavia_Grant  food  honeybees  manufacturers  food_tech  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  agribusiness  foodservice  Guelph  economies_of_scale  probiotics  product_development  Canada  Canadian 
december 2012 by jerryking
Don't just co-operate on innovation: collaborate too
March 14th, 2012 | Globe & Mail | Editorials.

A Public Policy Forum report makes a persuasive case that Canada's comparative weakness in innovation and productivity growth is not so much a matter of any supposed lack of inventiveness, or of deficient economic policies, as of a characteristically Canadian difficulty in making contacts and establishing practical collaborations among innovators and investors.....there is a need to identify ways and means by which "angel" investors, venture capitalists and mentors, on the one hand, and researchers and inventors, on the other, find each other.......a recurrent theme of this report is the fairly inexpensive creation of "incubators" and other physical spaces and contexts – "soft infrastructure" – in which such relationships can be hatched. All concerned should encourage networking.....although competitiveness in the global marketplace matters more than geography, the distinctly geographical fact of regional clusters is central to the report – Waterloo, Ont., is the best-known Canadian example....Canadians need to learn how to accept failure and to try again – as inventors must do........Lynch spoke about being co-operative – in other words, accommodating – but Canadians are often lacking when it comes to being collaborative described as the creation of "real working arrangements to share risk, obligation and reward."

In effect, this report takes E.M. Forster's phrase in his novel Howard's End, "Only connect," and adds, "Actually work together, too."
angels  clusters  editorials  collaboration  incubators  innovation  inventiveness  investors  Kevin_Lynch  Kitchener-Waterloo  productivity  vc 
april 2012 by jerryking
Streetwise strategy for an urban future
March 28 2011 | FT.com | By Andrew Hill. The McKinsey Global
Institute, the consultancy’s research arm, has projected how hundreds of
cities may fuel the global economy in 2025. Its “Urban World” report
suggests a bigger contribution to growth, the lodestone of corporate
strategy, will come from places below the top rank than from megacities
like Shanghai, New York and Delhi. What’s more, 230 of those places –
“middleweight” cities, poised to expand – don’t even appear in today’s
top 600.

The report sends an urgent invitation to companies to rethink their
country- and continent-specific approach to strategy and look more
closely at urban centres and clusters. Farewell, Emea and Brics. Hello,
Huambo, Medan and Viña del Mar.
McKinsey  urban  Richard_Florida  demographic_changes  North_Star  cities  China  unilever  Yum_Brands  clusters  megacities  growth  global_economy 
march 2011 by jerryking
Business clusters ‘irrelevant’ for innovation, study finds - The Globe and Mail
Naomi Powell
March 18, 2011
At some point, the “business cluster” emerged as a kind of silver bullet
for economically-challenged municipalities.

Find a way to put companies together in a single geographic area and
they will become each other’s customers, suppliers and collaborators.
Innovation, prosperity and jobs will follow.

A new study from Europe’s Centre for Economic Policy Research throws a
wrench into at least one part of that theory.

The analysis of 1,604 companies in the five largest Norwegian cities
found that regional and national clusters are “irrelevant for
innovation.” On the contrary, international cooperation or “global
pipelines” were identified as the main drivers of innovation.
michael_porter  economic_development  innovation  clusters  irrelevance  Norway 
march 2011 by jerryking
The Nation of Futurity
November 16, 2009 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS.
"...faith in the future has motivated generations of Americans..". "The
faith is the molten core of the country’s dynamism. There are also
periodic crises of faith. "Today, the rise of China is producing such a
crisis." "The Chinese now have lavish faith in their scientific and
technological potential." "The anxiety in America is caused by the vague
sense that they [China] has what we’re supposed to have.... faith in
the future...." "The U.S. now has an economy shifted too much toward
consumption, debt and imports and too little toward production,
innovation and exports." "It would be nice if some leader could induce
the country to salivate for the future again...connecting discrete
policies — education, technological innovation, funding for basic
research — into a single long-term narrative." "It would mean creating
regional strategies, because innovation happens in geographic clusters,
not at the national level."
David_Brooks  China  future  faith  innovation  regional  America_in_Decline?  consumption  debt  imports  clusters 
november 2009 by jerryking
Conference to explore creativity in urban centres
Posted on 11/02/09 by JEFF GRAY.

In a partnership with the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto - headed by urban thinker Richard Florida - the city of Toronto will spend $10,000 on an international conference this June on "cultural mapping."

The conference, highlighted in yesterday's city budget, will be called Placing Creativity. It will include international cultural policy researchers and "explore the connection between place, creativity and the economy."

The event, billed in a budget document as a "major gathering of international thinkers," will focus on the geographic discipline of "cultural mapping," which looks at the way artists and art institutions cluster and the effect they have on neighbouring businesses.
creativity  Jeff_Gray  conferences  physical_place  spillover  ideacity  creative_types  urban  cultural_mapping  clusters  artists  cultural_institutions  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
february 2009 by jerryking

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