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jerryking : coming-of-age   13

Opinion | The Best Year of Our Lives
April 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ross Douthat.

There’s a theory of human psychology that holds that the time you enter maturity becomes fixed in your mind as a civilizational peak — with everything since a falling-off that conveniently matches your own stagger toward the grave. Thus it doesn’t matter if you came of age in the Great Depression or some other nadir; because you were 18 then, it must have been a golden age......I’ve been thinking about how good we had it lately because we’re 20 years out from 1999, and the cultural press is thick with reminders that it was a pop-culture annus mirabilis — from the premiere of “The Sopranos” that defined a golden age of television, to the yearlong cascade of brilliant movies .....from a Hollywood not yet captive to the superhero era......Widen the aperture a little, so that the “Xennial” cultural era covers 1995 to 2005, and you get everything from the perfection of the sitcom (late “Seinfeld,” season one of “Friends,” the silver age of “The Simpsons,” “Arrested Development”) to the peak of HBO (when “The Wire” and “The Sopranos” and “Deadwood” and “Sex and the City” were all airing). Oh, and those were also the days when George R.R. Martin could publish three “Game of Thrones” novels in five years, inventing all the good parts of the TV show’s plot in an end-of-millennium rush.....cold hard economic data also suggest that ours was a uniquely blessed coming-of-age: a time of low unemployment, surging productivity, strong working-class wage growth — and all without a huge overhang of public and private debt.......a statement about generational experiences, Alter was basically right. If you were born around 1980, you grew up in a space happily between — between eras of existential threat (Cold War/War on Terror, or Cold War/climate change), between foreign policy debacles (Vietnam/Iraq), between epidemics (crack and AIDS/opioids and suicide), and between two different periods of economic stagnation (the ’70s and early Aughts).
'90s  op-ed  Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  annus_mirabilis  coming-of-age  cultural_gatekeepers  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  millennials  movies  noughties  popular_culture  Ross_Douthat  television  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  The_Wire 
april 2019 by jerryking
Good Schools Aren’t the Secret to Israel’s High-Tech Boom - WSJ
March 20, 2017

Israel’s shadow education system has three components. The first is our heritage of debate—it’s in the Jewish DNA. For generations Jews have studied the Talmud, our legal codex, in a way vastly different from what goes on in a standard classroom. Instead of listening to a lecture, the meaning of complex texts is debated by students in hevruta—pairs—with a teacher offering occasional guidance.

Unlike quiet Western libraries, the Jewish beit midrash—house of study—is a buzzing beehive of learning. Since the Talmud is one of the most complex legal codes ever gathered, the idea of a verdict is almost irrelevant to those studying. Students engage in debate for the sake of debate. They analyze issues from all directions, finding different solutions. Multiple answers to a single question are common. Like the Talmud itself—which isn’t the written law but a gathering of protocols—the learning process, not the result, is valued.

The second component of our shadow education system is the peer-teaches-peer model of Jewish youth organizations, membership-based groups that we call “movements.” Teenagers work closely with younger children; they lead groups on excursions and hikes, develop informal curricula, and are responsible for those in their care. As an 11th-grade student, I took fifth-graders on an overnight hike in the mountains. Being given responsibilities at a young age helped shape me into who I am today.

The third component is the army.
Israel  ksfs  education  high_schools  schools  Jewish  Talmud  protocols  Judaism  books  religion  coming-of-age  technology  science_&_technology  venture_capital  innovation  human_capital  capitalization  struggles  convictions  tough-mindedness  rigour  discomforts  cultural_values  arduous 
march 2017 by jerryking
Moonlight bravely aims to create a fuller picture of black masculinity - The Globe and Mail
ANDRAY DOMISE
Special to The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Moonlight is an undeniably beautiful coming-of-age story told in three parts, adapted from playwright Tarell McCraney’s In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. To say it tells the story of a young man growing up is true, and to say this film is a cinematic achievement is also true, but both are understatements. In film, literature and especially the evening news, black masculinity is rarely explored as more than a pathology – gnarled and twisted by crime, poverty and broken families. Through striking visuals and muted, simmering performances from the cast, Jenkins diffracts a broad range of black stereotypes and masterfully reunites them with their missing layers of humanity.
films  TIFF  movies  African-Americans  masculinity  Andray_Domise  Moonlight  coming-of-age  '80s  multidimensional  Miami  stereotypes  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
Courses in Manhood for African-American Boys - The New York Times
FEB. 4, 2016 | NYT | By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN.

While lower grades focus on the stories, legacies and images of black people, high school students take a deep dive into African-American history and culture, from ancient civilizations to the civil rights movement to contemporary media. All classes are taught by black male instructors whose own experiences and perspectives provide a multidimensional understanding of the students they mentor (in Oakland, as elsewhere, more than half the teachers are white and most are women).
African-Americans  coming-of-age  cultural_identity  high_schools  history  life_skills  male  masculinity  mentoring  Oakland  rituals  students  values 
february 2016 by jerryking
Coming of Age, Whether They Like It or Not - The New York Times
By MEGAN RUBINER ZINN JANUARY 31, 2016

The various cultures that created coming-of-age rituals knew what they were doing, and it’s not surprising that the rituals have maintained a place in the modern world. At this cusp of the teen years, when kids are excited and afraid to be adults, when they try out new personalities by the day, when their sense of self may be dictated by their peers and the media, they have an accomplishment that is all theirs. It need not be a religious or cultural ritual, just a challenging, adult responsibility. In the case of a bar or bat mitzvah, kids take on something that is extraordinarily hard, something that requires persistence and focus for months, if not years, something that they may not want to do. And they do it, in front of their family and friends, and they do it very well. From there, no matter what challenges these kids meet: a difficult class, paper, exam, a scary responsibility, decision or action, they can look back on this day and remind themselves of what they accomplished when they were only 13.
Judaism  Jewish  rituals  aging  children  coming-of-age  persistence  arduous  focus  stressful  perseverance  endurance 
january 2016 by jerryking
Black Kudos • Claude Brown Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 -...
Claude Brown

Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, published to critical acclaim in 1965, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. He also published Children of Ham (1976).
writers  nostalgia  African-Americans  Harlem  New_York_City  '50s  lawyers  '40s  coming-of-age 
october 2015 by jerryking
A murder that changed Toronto
Oct. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by GAYLE MacDONALD.
Toronto's loss of innocence....Anthony De Sa's new novel, Kicking The Sky, revolves around the murder of 12-year-old Emanuel Jaques and its impact on Toronto's Portuguese community, the city at large and three young boys who decide to search for Emanuel’s body. It is a coming-of-age story about hard truths and loss of innocence.
killings  Toronto  ethnic_communities  '70s  writers  neighbourhoods  Portuguese  coming-of-age  hard_truths 
october 2013 by jerryking
New urban design plays a heady game of risk
Mar 12, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3|
Doug Saunders.

The slogan of the new movement that is overtaking Europe's cities: "To make it safe, you need to make it dangerous." Iain Borden, director of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London and a leader of this new movement. Its members recently published an intriguing report titled "What Are We Scared of: The Value of Risk in Designing Public Space."

In recent months, a school of architects and urban planners has picked up disparate cues from the urban experiments taking place in northern Europe and given them a name -- risk. Our cities, they believe, are now designed predominantly to minimize risk, and this has made them dull, homogeneous, repetitious and, paradoxically, often quite dangerous.

(Risk is more than an intellectual puzzle — it invokes a profoundly physical experience. A small amount of danger surrounding the use of public spaces might act much like a vaccine immunizing the population against complacency).
Doug_Saunders  urban  design  risks  safety  public_spaces  counterintuitive  urban_planning  uncertainty  complacency  biology  psychology  dangers  life_skills  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  high-risk  low-risk  soul-enriching  physical_experiences 
october 2011 by jerryking
Judging the risks in the backcountry
Feb 4, 2003 | The Globe & Mail pg. A.18 | editorial.
Becoming independent requires some assumption of risk. That is the
process of growing up. Toronto's school board, failing to understand
this, demolished its playground equipment in 170 schoolyards three years
ago without any statistical evidence of dangerousness. Hockey, Canada's
game, exposes boys and girls to the risk of serious spinal-cord
injuries, yet the game goes on.
risks  life_and_death  life_skills  TDSB  children  editorials  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  playgrounds  dangers  soul-enriching 
december 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Columnists / Luke Johnson - Rites of passage for young entrepreneurs
Published: July 15 2008 FT column By Luke Johnson that focuses
on the fact that Gen X and Gen Y entrepreneurs have never been in
business during a recession. Worries that a lot of their companies are
fragile constructs, not built to weather severe conditions. Established
corporates have years of retained profits to fall back on but smaller,
newer businesses do not.
adversity  bouncing_back  brands  coming-of-age  entrepreneurship  Fortune_500  fragility  Generation_X  hard_times  large_companies  Luke_Johnson  recessions  resilience  retained_earnings  serial_entrepreneurship  setbacks  start_ups 
february 2009 by jerryking

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