recentpopularlog in

jerryking : commercialization   44

Canada’s IP strategy is not in step with our innovation and commercialization goals - The Globe and Mail
JIM HINTON AND PETER COWAN
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 57 MINUTES AGO
UPDATED NOVEMBER 25, 2018
Jim Hinton is a principal at Own Innovation and Peter Cowan is a principal at Northworks IP

There is a global arms race for artificial intelligence-related intellectual property. The United States and China are amassing thousands of patent filings related to AI and machine learning.....The hype surrounding R&D funding has not translated to commercialization of AI outside of a small handful of domestic high-growth companies, such as Hatch and Sightline Innovation. This confirms what we already know: Innovation and IP funding announcements alone are not a strategy for growth. What Canada needs is a strategy to own its AI innovations and turn them into prosperity engines for the Canadian economy.

Lost in the hype around Canada becoming an AI hub is an absolute lack of follow-through to ensure intellectual property (IP) rights are preserved for current and future Canadian commercialization needs. There is currently no strategy in any of the taxpayer-funded programs ensuring IP ownership is maintained for the benefit of the Canadian economy. ......Companies such as Alphabet, Huawei and others will continue to partner with Canadian universities and use Canadian taxpayer-funded technology to their global advantage: Of the 100 or so machine learning-related patents that have been developed in Canada over the past 10 years, more than half have ended up in the hands of foreign companies such as Microsoft and IBM.......

.........To reverse the status quo, Canada’s IP strategy must include at least four key tactics: (1) IP generation, ensuring that Canadian firms own valuable IP and data stocks; (2) IP retention; (3) freedom to operate strategies for our innovative high-growth companies; and (4) alignment of the national IP strategy with the national data strategy.
artificial_intelligence  Canada  innovation  intellectual_property  machine_learning  property_rights  arms_race  commercialization  Jim_Balsillie 
november 2018 by jerryking
Empty talk on innovation is killing Canada’s economic prosperity
Mar. 19, 2017 | Globe & Mail | by JIM BALSILLIE.

Immigration, traditional infrastructure such as roads and bridges, tax policy, stable banking regulation and traditional trade agreements are all 19th- and 20th-century economic levers that advance Canada’s traditional industries, but they have little impact on 21st-century productivity.

The outdated economic orthodoxy behind our discourse on innovation is causing the steady erosion of our national prosperity.

Over the past 30 years, commercialization of intellectual property (IP) became the primary driver of new wealth. The structure of the 21st-century company shifted and IP became the most valuable corporate asset. IP is an intangible good that requires policy infrastructure that’s completely different than the infrastructure required to get traditional tangible goods to market. IP relies on a tightly designed ecosystem of highly technical interlocking policies focused on scaling companies, which are “agents” of innovation outputs.....Canada doesn’t have valuable IP to sell to the world so we continue exporting low-margin resource and agricultural goods while importing high-margin IP. If our leaders want to create sustainable economic growth, Canada’s growth strategy must focus on creating high-margin IP-based exports that the world wants and must pay for.........IP ownership is the competitive driver in the new global economy, not exchange rates that adjust production costs. That’s why despite the strong U.S. dollar, U.S. company valuations and exports are soaring – IP-intensive industries added $6.6-trillion (U.S.) to the U.S. economy in 2014. So what is Canada’s strategy to increase our ownership of valuable IP assets and commercialize them globally? Supply chains in the innovation economy are different than in traditional economies because IP operates on a winner-take-all economic principle with zero marginal production costs. IP is traded differently than tangible goods because IP moves across borders on the principle of restriction, not free trade. Trade liberalization increases competition and reduces prices, but increased IP protection does the exact opposite. The economy for intangible goods is fundamentally different than the one for tangible goods. Productivity in the global innovation economy is driven by new ideas that generate new revenue for new markets. What Canada needs is a strategy to turn its new ideas into new revenue.....The Growth Council missed our overriding priority for growth: a national strategy to generate IP that Canadian companies can commercialize to scale globally.

We urgently need sophisticated strategies to drive the commercialization of Canadian ideas through our most innovative companies.
innovation  Jim_Balsillie  happy_talk  intellectual_property  scaling  tax_codes  winner-take-all  productivity  intangibles  digital_economy  ideas  self-deception  patents  commercialization  national_strategies  global_economy  property_rights  protocols  borderless 
march 2017 by jerryking
Canada should take advantage of a new power innovation - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 20, 2016

“low temperature micro-geothermal engines.......There are many definitions of “innovation,” but the one I use is this: the application of an existing technology to a new and very useful purpose. Here we are seeing true innovation take shape. For a very long time, it seems nanotechnology has been an invention waiting for something useful to do. But now we are seeing the emergence of something not only useful, but crucial to solving our power needs.

We need to be innovative, but we also need to recognize and capitalize on innovation when it happens. The advances in nanotechnology, 3-D printing and geology must not remain trapped in university labs. Commercializing the technology is the next step, but this is where Canadians have often fallen short. We’ve innovated something amazing – now let’s capitalize on it.
Todd_Hirsch  innovation  power_generation  Alberta  geothermal  nanotechnology  commercialization  renewable 
may 2016 by jerryking
Six ideas for commercializing innovation in Canada - The Globe and Mail
MIKE BROWN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015
innovation  commercialization  ideas  Canada 
october 2015 by jerryking
Canadians can innovate, but we’re not equipped to win - The Globe and Mail
JIM BALSILLIE
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 08 2015

[For Corey Reid and UpSark]

...We can make commercialization of ideas a source of our prosperity if we apply strategic approaches....The commercialization of ideas is a chain of systematic and deliberate events. This is how wealth is generated in an innovation economy. Growing and scaling up a critical mass of ideas-based companies in the global marketplace is difficult, but not impossible. Yet for us to expect that the results of our current innovation policies and investments will miraculously spur new companies and significant economic growth is, as many people like to say, the definition of insanity: doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting a different result....Canada’s innovation performance will not improve unless the country’s business, university and political leadership comes together to consider radically different policies, programs and tools.
angels  commercialization  digital_economy  ecosystems  ideas  innovation  industrial_policies  innovation_policies  intellectual_property  Jim_Balsillie  patents  policy_tools  property_rights  protocols  scaling  systematic_approaches  wishful_thinking 
may 2015 by jerryking
Making dollars and sense of the open data economy - O'Reilly Radar
by Alex Howard | @digiphile | +Alex Howard | Comment | December 11, 2012.

Any post-mortems that picked up on the broad challenges, problems. difficulties of monetizing open-data?
monetization  open_data  commercialization 
january 2014 by jerryking
Accessing Open Data via APIs: Never Mind the App, Is There a Market for That?
Mark Boyd, September 4th, 2013

But is the market ready to monetize? In Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, authors Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier argue that at present, those with “the most value in the big data value chain” are those businesses and entrepreneurs with an innovative mindset attuned to the potential of big and open data. While still in its nascence, “the ideas and the skills seem to hold the greatest worth”, they say. However, they expect:

“…eventually most value will be in the data itself. This is because we’ll be able to do more with the information, and also because the data holders will better appreciate the potential value of the asset they possess. As a result, they’ll probably hold it more tightly than ever, and charge outsiders a high price for access.”
data_scientists  open_data  massive_data_sets  entrepreneurship  start_ups  InfoChimps  Junar  mindsets  commercialization  monetization 
january 2014 by jerryking
Monetizing open data
September 21, 2012| Strata| by Jenn Webb

One of the big questions on everyone’s mind at this year’s Open Knowledge Festival in Helsinki, according to a report by David Meyer at ZDNet, is: Where’s the money in open data?

Ville Peltola, IBM’s innovation chief in Finland, told Meyer the situation is becoming frustrating, that he doesn’t understand why it’s so hard to properly open up data, or even just some of it. “You could have bronze, silver and gold APIs, where more data costs more,” Peltola said to Meyer. “It’s like a drug dealer. Maybe you have to solve this chicken-and-egg problem by giving samples of raw data.”

Meyer points out the real issue inherent in what Peltola is saying: “that large amounts of data are very valuable, and the companies that create them tend not to know how to realise the greatest value from them.” Peltola had an interesting idea to address this: “What if you have an internal start-up in your company tasked only with monetising your data?”

Chris Taggart, co-founder of OpenCorporates, made a more competitive argument for opening up your company’s data: it “exposes your competitors’ internal contradictions” and might inspire disruption, he told Meyer — “Most big, fat secure companies don’t have the confidence to disrupt themselves,” he said.
open_data  monetization  massive_data_sets  problems  challenges  intrapreneurship  chicken-and-egg  commercialization  APIs  disruption  complacency  contradictions 
december 2013 by jerryking
If BlackBerry is sold, Canada faces an innovation vacuum - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

The sale and breakup of a flagship technology company is a reoccurring theme in Canadian business. But this time is different. If BlackBerry Ltd. goes, there is no ready replacement. That’s a telling switch from the situation Canada faced with the sale of Newbridge Networks in 2000 and the demise of Nortel Networks in 2009....Canada has an innovation bottleneck. An abundance of science is generated in university labs and start-up firms but most of it never finds its way into commercial applications. Risk-averse banks and too many businesses of the bird-in-the-hand variety remain the weak links in Canada’s innovation system.

“We punch above our weight in idea generation,” observes Michael Bloom, who leads the Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Business Innovation. “But the further you move towards commercialization, the weaker we get as a country.”....Innovation can be driven by any sector, even the old-economy resource extraction business of the oil sands. But tech firms remain by far the most R&D-intensive players in any economy.

Hence, the tech sector is a key barometer of a country’s innovation strength. And innovation matters because it has a profound influence on our living standards – it is “the key long-run driver of productivity and income growth,” ...Canadian businesses remain oddly complacent.

“We tend in this county not to look at the true market opportunity of innovation,” Mr. Bloom adds. “If you only see a market of 35 million people, you’re going to see more risk than if you see the market as Europe, the U.S. and Asia. Americans see risk, but also great opportunity.”

It’s no coincidence that many of Canada’s greatest entrepreneurs and innovators have been immigrants. Unlike his American counterpart, the average Canadian business graduate does not dream of becoming the next Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs or, for that matter, Peter Munk.

Mr. Lazaridis and ex-BlackBerry co-CEO Jim Balsillie notwithstanding, how many Canadian entrepreneurs and innovators have truly changed the world, or aspire? By all accounts, not that many. A Conference Board study released last month found that only 10 per cent of Canadian firms (almost all of them small ones) pursue “radical or revolutionary” innovations. Large firms focus at best on “incremental” innovations.
Blackberry  bottlenecks  commercialization  competitiveness_of_nations  complacency  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Newbridge  Nortel  innovation  idea_generation  ecosystems  breakthroughs  incrementalism  large_companies  sellout_culture  Jim_Balsillie  moonshots  immigrants  Canada  Peter_Munk  market_opportunities  weak_links  thinking_big  oil_sands  resource_extraction  marginal_improvements  innovation_vacuum  punch-above-its-weight  This_Time_is_Different 
august 2013 by jerryking
Canada gets good and bad news from a new measure of innovation
Jul. 22 2013 | The Globe and Mail | DAVID PARKINSON.

how does Canada fare? Among major industrialized economies, it’s a middle-of-the-pack innovator – nestled in between France and Sweden, a discernible notch or two below the traditional innovative leaders such as the United States, Great Britain, Germany and Japan. (Among all countries globally, Canada ranks 11th.)

But the details of Canada’s ranking by this measure are more telling. By the university education measure, Canada’s top three schools rank higher than every other country except the U.S. and Britain. Canada’s citations of scientific research are in the top five in the world.

Where Canada’s innovation falls down, however, is in international patents. Canada ranks a weak 19th in the world by this measure, well behind the likes of Denmark, Israel and even Barbados.

In short, we have great schools and world-class thinkers, but for some reason that’s not translating into a lot of global-scale breakthroughs. This finding suggests a need to address our policy approach to research and development; we’re stumbling on a critical step needed to convert big brains and great ideas into vehicles for economic growth and global leadership.
Canada  Canadian  innovation  metrics  competitiveness_of_nations  breakthroughs  mediocrity  patents  commercialization  industrial_economy  bad_news 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Financial Bonanza of Big Data
March 7, 2013 | WSJ | By KENNETH CUKIER AND VIKTOR MAYER-SCHÖNBERGER:
Vast troves of information are manipulated and monetized, yet companies have a hard time assigning value to it...The value of information captured today is increasingly in the myriad secondary uses to which it is put—not just the primary purpose for which it was collected.[True, but this secondary or exhaust data has to be placed in the right context in order to maximize value]. In the past, shopkeepers kept a record of all transactions so that they could tally the sums at the end of the day. The sales data were used to understand sales. Only more recently have retailers parsed those records to look for business trends...With big data, information is more potent, and it can be applied to areas unconnected with what it initially represented. Health officials could use Google's history of search queries—for things like cough syrup or sneezes—to track the spread of the seasonal flu in the United States. The Bank of England has used Google searches as a leading indicator for housing prices in the United Kingdom. Other central banks have studied search queries as a gauge for changes in unemployment.

Companies world-wide are starting to understand that no matter what industry they are in, data is among their most precious assets. Harnessed cleverly, the data can unleash new forms of economic value.
massive_data_sets  Amazon  books  Google  branding  Facebook  Wal-Mart  Bank_of_England  data  data_driven  value_creation  JCK  exhaust_data  commercialization  monetization  valuations  windfalls  alternative_data  economic_data  tacit_data  interpretation  contextual  sense-making  tacit_knowledge 
march 2013 by jerryking
Monetize, Monetize, Monetize: Startups need to make money fast. - WSJ.com
February 6, 2013, 9:32 p.m. ET

Monetize, Monetize, Monetize

By DAVID WEIDNER
Like this columnist
commercialization  monetization  start_ups 
february 2013 by jerryking
M.I.T. Lab Hatches Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens - NYTimes.com
November 24, 2012 | NYT | By HANNAH SELIGSON.

Dr. Robert Langer, 64, knows how. Since the 1980s, his Langer Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has spun out companies whose products treat cancer, diabetes, heart disease and schizophrenia, among other diseases, and even thicken hair.

The Langer Lab is on the front lines of turning discoveries made in the lab into a range of drugs and drug delivery systems. Without this kind of technology transfer, the thinking goes, scientific discoveries might well sit on the shelf, stifling innovation.

A chemical engineer by training, Dr. Langer has helped start 25 companies and has 811 patents, issued or pending, to his name.
MIT  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  start_ups  technology_transfers  scaling  mentoring  biotech  pharmaceutical_industry  innovation  academia  commercialization  accelerators  incubators 
november 2012 by jerryking
New Rules for Bringing Innovations to Market
March 2004 | HBR | Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The more networked a market is, the harder it is for an innovation to take hold, writes Bhaskar Chakravorti, who leads Monitor Group's practice on strategies for growth and managing uncertainty through the application of game theory. Chakravorti argues that executives need to rethink the way they bring innovations to market, specifically by orchestrating behavior change across the market, so that a large number of players adopt their offerings and believe they are better off for having done so. He outlines a four-part framework for doing just that: The innovator must reason back from a target endgame, implementing only those strategies that maximize its chances of getting to its goal. It must complement power players, positioning its innovation as an enhancement to their products or services. The innovator must offer coordinated switching incentives to three core groups: the players that add to the innovation's benefits, the players that act as channels to adopters and the adopters themselves. And it must preserve flexibility in case its initial strategy fails.

Chakravorti uses Adobe's introduction of its Acrobat software as an example of an innovator that took into account other players in the network--and succeeded because of it. As more content became available in Acrobat format, more readers were motivated to download the program," he observes. "The flexibility in Acrobat's product structure and the segmentation in the market allowed the pricing elasticity that resulted in the software's widespread adoption."
HBR  innovation  networks  network_effects  rules_of_the_game  commercialization  monetization  product_launches  howto  growth  managing_uncertainty  cloud_computing  endgame  Adobe  uncertainty  switching_costs  jump-start  platforms  orchestration  ecosystems  big_bang  behaviours  behavioral_change  frameworks  sharing_economy  customer_adoption  thinking_backwards  new_categories  early_adopters  distribution_channels  work-back_schedules 
july 2012 by jerryking
Data as a Renewable Commodity and Profit Center — Jason Kolb dot Com
June 6, 2011 | Jason Kolb.com | By Jason Kolb.

One of the reasons I love data is because there’s so much potential for mining real value from it, especially when you combine it with other, new data sources. In fact it acts a lot like a traditional commodity such as copper or wool in that someone produces it, and then someone else buys the raw material and makes something new from it. It’s unique from traditional commodities, however, in that it doesn’t get used up at all when it’s used to create something new–this makes it particularly interesting from an economic point of view.

In addition, anyone can make it, it doesn’t get used up, and the industry of using data to create new and valuable things is still so young and ripe for profit-making. In fact I think it’s one of the areas that America needs to focus on if its economy is to recover because for the most part it’s still virgin territory and it’s going to create a lot of economic value. What I really don’t want to see is foreign companies being the first to capitalize on the data as that would suck most of the value out of our economy, just what we don’t need right now.
data  commercialization  renewable  commodities  metadata  Factual  Infochimps  data_scientists  information_sources 
june 2012 by jerryking
Twitter sells your feed to Big Data - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 01, 2012 |Reuters| by Mitch Lipka.

Boulder, Colorado-based Gnip Inc. and DataSift Inc., based in the U.K. and San Francisco, are licensed by Twitter to analyze archived tweets and basic information about users, like geographic location. DataSift announced this week that it will release Twitter data in packages that will encompass the last two years of activity for its customers to mine, while Gnip can go back only 30 days.
Twitter  Gnip  massive_data_sets  data_scientists  commercialization  DataSift  social_data 
march 2012 by jerryking
PeteSearch: How to turn data into money
October 20, 2010 by Pete Warden. The most important unsolved
question for Big Data startups is how to make money. Here's a hierarchy
showing the stages from raw data to cold, hard cash:
(1) Data. You have a bunch of files containing info. you've gathered,
way too much for any human to ever read. You know there's a lot of
useful stuff in there though, but you can talk until you're blue in the
face & the people with the checkbooks will keep them closed. The
data itself, no matter how unique, is low value, since it will take
somebody else a lot of effort to turn it into something they can use to
make $. (2) Charts. Take that massive deluge of data and turn it into
some summary tables & simple graphs. You want to give an unbiased
overview of the info., so the tables & graphs are quite detailed.
This makes a bit more sense to the potential end-users, they can at
least understand what it is you have, and start to imagine ways they
could use it. (3) Reports; (4) Recommendations.
analysis  commercialization  data  data_driven  data_marketplaces  data_scientists  entrepreneurship  hierarchies  ideas  InfoChimps  massive_data_sets  monetization  value_creation  visualization 
july 2011 by jerryking
Data-as-a-Service: Factual, InfoChimps & Google Squared
Oct. 20, 2010, By Imran Ali . Do you have unique datasets in
your biz. that could be valuable to others?...dB apps have been
curiously absent from the mix of web worker productivity tools...a new
generation of tools are providing this functionality. DaaS providers are
emerging enabling users to create, manage & publish specialized
datasets, providing both authoring tools & opportunities to
participate in a web of data, not just of pgs...Factual bills itself as
an “open data repository” where users can upload & create datasets,
as well as add data hosted by Factual to their own sites &
apps...InfoChimps positions itself as a “data mktplace” enabling
publishers & owners of datasets to charge for their usage.
Publishers can offer free & paid datasets, charging either for API
access or for making them downloadable. Some datasets are organized into
collections from particular organizations,e.g. Wikipedia & Data.gov
==> InfoChimps allows orgs. to outsource mgmt. of their open data
policies.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
What's an example of a company creating a valuable dataset from scratch?
DaaS  Infochimps  Factual  data  Google_Squared  Freshbooks  massive_data_sets  databases  data_scientists  commercialization 
july 2011 by jerryking
Data markets aren't coming. They're already here
26 January 2011 | O'Reilly Radar| by Julie Steele.

Jud Valeski is cofounder and CEO of Gnip, a social media data provider
that aggregates feeds from sites like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr,
delicious, and others into one API.

Jud will be speaking at Strata next week on a panel titled "What's Mine
is Yours: the Ethics of Big Data Ownership."
Find out more about growing business of data marketplaces at a "Data
Marketplaces" panel with Ian White of Urban Mapping, Peter Marney of
Thomson Reuters and Dennis Yang of Infochimps.

What do you wish more people understood about data markets and/or the
way large datasets can be used?

Jud Valeski: First, data is not free, and there's always someone out
there that wants to buy it. As an end-user, educate yourself with how
the content you create using someone else's service could ultimately be
used by the service-provider. Second, black markets are a real problem,
and just because "everyone else is doing it" doesn't mean it's okay.
markets  data  analytics  massive_data_sets  digital_economy  content_creators  black_markets  Infochimps  Gnip  Thomson_Reuters  commercialization  data_scientists  data_marketplaces  social_data  financial_data 
may 2011 by jerryking
Can capitalism save space travel? - The Globe and Mail
Paul Taylor
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 08, 2011
NASA  space_travel  commercialization 
april 2011 by jerryking
Start-Up U | U of T Culture of Innovation, Commercialization of Research in Toronto
Autumn 2010 | University of Toronto Magazine | By David Naylor. U of T is helping to create a culture of innovation
By David Naylor
start_ups  uToronto  MaRS  commercialization  innovation  entrepreneurship  interdisciplinary  incubators  David_Naylor 
november 2010 by jerryking
Canada’s sorry state of innovation - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 09, 2010 | Globe & Mail | BARRIE McKENNA &
JEREMY TOROBIN. Prof. D’Cruz says what’s really lacking in Canada is a
thriving “innovation ecosystem” – clusters where research institutions
and companies feed off each other. The most successful ecosystems are
built around homegrown multinationals – companies like Research In
Motion, Bombardier and SNC-Lavalin. But Canada has few of these global
players. Our economy is dominated by foreign companies, which are far
less likely to invest heavily in R&D, Prof. D’Cruz says. Our
universities aren’t optimized for innovation, either. Shirley Tilghman,
a Canadian-born molecular biologist and president of Princeton
University, says Canada continues to dole out research grants to too
many scientists based on “the equalitarian spirit."
innovation  Canada  commercialization 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Idea Incubator Goes to Campus
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By BOB TEDESCHI. M.I.T. is in
the vanguard of a movement involving a handful of universities
nationwide that work closely with investors to ensure that promising
ideas are nurtured and turned into successful start-ups. At first
glance, the centers look like academic versions of business incubators.
But universities are getting involved now at a much earlier stage than
incubators typically do. Rather than offering seed money to businesses
that already have a product and a staff, as incubators usually do, the
universities are harvesting great ideas and then trying to find
investors and businesspeople interested in developing them further and
exploring their commercial viability.

In the jargon of academia, the locations of such matchmaking are known
as “proof-of-concept centers,” and they’re among a number of new
approaches to commercializing university research in more efficient and
purposeful ways — and to preventing good ideas from dying quietly.
Colleges_&_Universities  commercialization  incubators  entrepreneurship  start_ups  MIT 
june 2010 by jerryking
Driving ideas to success with plan for profit
March 31, 2008 | Western News | By Paul Wells, BA'89.
Research works best when its only spur is the curiosity and energy of
thoughtful investigators with the tools to follow hunches. But the
product of their work - ideas - is likeliest to leave the lab when it is
pulled out by entrepreneurs who have an eye on the market. It's
important to get that balance right. It's pointless to fund only
research that looks likely to pay off. You can't know which ideas will
pay off. But new ideas won't go anywhere without competent managers to
implement them. Roger Martin at the University of Toronto's Rotman
School of Management has persuasively demonstrated that if Canada has
fewer high-tech industries than the United States, it's not because
we're doing less science, it's because we have a smaller
university-trained management class. Western's Ivey School of Business
is a big part of the solution, not part of the problem.
UWO  Ivey  Rotman  Roger_Martin  Paul_Wells  curiosity  commodities  natural_resources  research  R&D  entrepreneurship  commercialization  management 
may 2010 by jerryking
From intrapreneurship to entrepreneurship: Is technical expertise sufficient?- a case study
Spring 2003 | New England Journal of Entrepreneurship. Vol. 6, Iss. 1; pg. 55 | by John E Woodilla.
ProQuest  commercialization  software  hospitals  RFP 
april 2010 by jerryking
Some Considerations for Commercializing In-House Software
6/27/2007 | McGuireWoods LLP | Co authors are Derek Roach, Stephen Gold and Michael Hepburn.
in-house  software  commercialization  hospitals 
april 2010 by jerryking
UH developing cancer treatment software
Jan 28, 2000 | Pacific Business News Vol. 37, Iss. 47; pg. 24 | by Jacob Kamhis.
ProQuest  hospitals  software  commercialization  marketing  in-house 
april 2010 by jerryking
Diverse, talented city a laggard on innovation; Other North American metropolitan areas such as Boston and Seattle are doing better at commercializing the ideas generated by their creative class
Aug 17, 2009 | Toronto Star. pg. A.11 | Kevin Stolarick. "We
share the concerns of our colleagues at the University of Toronto Cities
Centre whose recent report, The Three Cities within Toronto, showed
that the city's core is becoming gentrified, with visible minorities
moving to the fringes along major transportation arteries." "As we move
into the creative age, Toronto must continue to build on its strengths -
its multicultural and talented workforce - and leverage these to become
more innovative."
downtown_core  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Toronto  creative_economy  economic_development  strengths  multiculturalism  gentrification  income_inequality  commercialization  visible_minorities 
september 2009 by jerryking
Entrepreneurs Aim to Build Loyalty - WSJ.com
JULY 21, 2009 |Wall Street Journal | By RAYMUND FLANDEZ.
Article describes how entrepreneurs are seeking new ways to convert buzz
into loyalty.
Companies With Cult Status Push Array of Giveaways and Contests to Build
Long-Term Business From First Rush of Success
buzz  customer_loyalty  commercialization  entrepreneur  Raymund_Flandez 
july 2009 by jerryking
Is yoga getting bent out of shape?
May 12, 2007 | The Globe & Mail | by IAN BROWN


Limber nirvana is big business now, as Canadian company Lululemon heads
to an IPO. But 5,000 years of tradition make for flexibility
yoga  commercialization  Ian_Brown  Lululemon 
april 2009 by jerryking
SMALL BUSINESS; Learning Entrepreneurship The U.S. Way at M.I.T.
Thursday, March 18, 2004 | The New York Times | By MARCI
ALBOHER NUSBAUM
The Cambridge-M.I.T. Institute, offers three one-year graduate programs
(with three additional ones to begin in October) with the aim to
cultivate Britain's future technology entrepreneurs, create jobs and
spur growth in the British technology sector
entrepreneurship  commercialization  mit  United_Kingdom  Colleges_&_Universities 
march 2009 by jerryking
Ping - How Google Decides to Pull the Plug - NYTimes.com
February 14, 2009 NYT article By VINDU GOEL on how Google
evaluates budding projects, its key tests for continued incubation, its
use of its own employees as a test bed, and its use of product-specific
blogs to communicate and listen to, the public.
attrition_rates  stage-gate  Daniel_Pink  Freshbooks  decision_making  business  innovation  Google  exits  trial_&_error  commercialization  projects  kill_rates  test_beds  assessments_&_evaluations  Communicating_&_Connecting  testing  blogs  new_products  Michael_McDerment  culling 
february 2009 by jerryking
Scum Power - WSJ.com
JUNE 30, 2008 WSJ article By RUSSELL GOLD. Challenges of commericalizing algae into fuel.
alternative_energy  energy  algae  commercialization 
february 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Taking ideas to market: an insider's view
Oct. 16, 2007 G&M article by Charles Finlay profiling Avanindra Utukuri, president and CTO of Nytric Ltd.
product_development  business_development  ideas  manufacturers  innovation  Nytric  monetization  commercialization 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read