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jerryking : competitive_strategy   14

The Evolving Automotive Ecosystem - The CIO Report - WSJ
April 6, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

An issue in many other industries. Will the legacy industry leaders be able to embrace the new digital technologies, processes and culture, or will they inevitably fall behind their faster moving, more culturally adept digital-native competitors? [the great game]

(1) Find new partners and dance: “The structure of the automotive industry will likely change rapidly. Designing and producing new vehicles have become far too complex and expensive for any likely one company to manage all on its own.
(2) Become data masters: “Know your customers better than they know themselves. Use that data to curate every aspect of the customer experience from when they first learn about the car to the dealership experience and throughout the customer life cycle. Having data scientists on staff will likely be the rule, not the exception.
(3) Update your economic models: “Predicting demand was hard enough in the old days, when you did a major new product launch approximately every five years. Now, with the intensity of competition, the rapid cadence of new launches, and the mashup of consumer and automotive technology, you may need new economic models for predicting demand, capital expenditures, and vehicle profitability.
(4)Tame complexity: “It’s all about the center stack, the seamless connectivity with nomadic devices, the elegance of the Human Machine Interface.
(5) Create adaptable organizations: “It will take a combination of new hard and soft skills to build the cars and the companies of the future. For many older, established companies, that means culture change, bringing in new talent, and rethinking every aspect of process and people management.
Apple  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  ecosystems  Google  know_your_customer  adaptability  CIOs  layer_mastery  competitive_landscape  competitive_strategy  connected_devices  telematics  data  data_driven  data_scientists  customer_experience  curation  structural_change  accelerated_lifecycles  UX  complexity  legacy_players  business_development  modelling  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  SMAC_stack  cultural_change  digitalization  connected_cars  the_great_game 
april 2015 by jerryking
Business School, Disrupted - NYTimes.com
MAY 31, 2014 | NYT | By JERRY USEEM.

The question: Should Harvard Business School enter the business of online education, and, if so, how?

In the Porter model, all of a company’s activities should be mutually reinforcing. By integrating everything into one, cohesive fortification, “any competitor wishing to imitate a strategy must replicate a whole system,” Professor Porter wrote.

In the Christensen model, these very fortifications become a liability. In the steel industry, which was blindsided by new technology in smaller and cheaper minimills, heavily integrated companies couldn’t move quickly and ended up entombed inside their elaborately constructed defenses.
HBS  deanships  disruption  Michael_Porter  competitive_strategy  steel  competitive_advantage  Clayton_Christensen  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  MOOCs  business_schools  Nitin_Nohria  blindsided  blind_spots 
june 2014 by jerryking
Why Canada’s tech companies fail - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Apr. 10 2014,

Missing in Canada, though, are advanced skills related to intellectual property rights. At companies, sophisticated IPR capacity is a “precondition to commercially scaling innovative technologies,” he said, noting only U.S., Japanese and South Korean companies have been among the top patent filers in the United States. BlackBerry is the only Canadian company in the top 100.

Mr. Balsillie said Apple Inc. and Google Inc. spend more on acquiring intellectual property rights than they do on research and development.

IPR skills are crucial if Canadian companies are to compete internationally, he said, or else they will end up as a “lambs for slaughter” in the global marketplace. “They will never grow and Canada will continue to fall behind at a [national] level.”

In an interview after his speech, Mr. Balsillie said Ottawa’s role should be to “sophisticatedly understand how the game is played, particularly in the U.S. and Europe, and make sure that companies are trained to thrive in the game.”

He said currently there are no professors in Canada teaching the global patent system in law, business or engineering schools, and there is no training in the subject in the civil service.

Intellectual property is so important, Mr. Balsillie said, that bilateral issues concerning IPR will eventually overtake traditional trade irritants between countries.
failure  Canada  start_ups  technology  Jim_Balsillie  intellectual_property  scaling  patents  property_rights  protocols  Canadian  industrial_policies  Ottawa  rules_of_the_game  civil_service  UpSpark  sophisticated  bilateral  competitive_strategy 
april 2014 by jerryking
Divide and Conquer: Competing with Free Technology under Network Effects - Academic Article - Harvard Business School
Summer 2008 | HBR |by Deishin Lee and Haim Mendelson

Abstract

We study how a commercial firm competes with a free open source product. The market consists of two customer segments with different preferences and is characterized by positive network effects. The commercial firm makes product and pricing decisions to maximize its profit. The open source developers make product decisions to maximize the weighted sum of the segments' consumer surplus, in addition to their intrinsic motivation. The more importance open source developers attach to consumer surplus, the more effort they put into developing software features. Even if consumers do not end up adopting the open source product, it can act as a credible threat to the commercial firm, forcing the firm to lower its prices. If the open source developers' intrinsic motivation is high enough, they will develop software regardless of eventual market dynamics. If the open source product is available first, all participants are better off when the commercial and open source products are compatible. However, if the commercial firm can enter the market first, it can increase its profits and gain market share by being incompatible with its open source competitor, even if customers can later switch at zero cost. This first-mover advantage does not arise because users are locked in, but because the commercial firm deploys a divide and conquer strategy to attract early adopters and exploit late adopters. To capitalize on its first-mover advantage, the commercial firm must increase its development investment to improve its product features.
early_adopters  late_adopters  networks  network_effects  free  competitive_advantage  product_launches  open_source  competitive_strategy  customer_adoption  first_movers  locked_in 
january 2013 by jerryking
Competitive Analysis for Competitive Advantage
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
Who are my relevant competitors?
What are the criteria to determine customer value creation?
What are the priorities for competition?
Compared to the leading competitors, how do we look on each criterion?
On which criteria are we better?
On which criteria are they better?
How can we better position ourselves on our "strong" criteria?
How can we improve the customer's perception of our "weak" criteria?
Where should we allocate resources?
Where will future changes come from in my competitor's strategies?
On what key customer "value criteria" will they change?
How can we anticipate these changes and "reposition" our strategy most effectively?
Ivey  frameworks  competitive_advantage  market_segmentation  Five_Forces_model  value_chains  competitive_strategy  strategy  products  product_strategy  competitive_intelligence  experiece_curves  cost_analysis  comparative_advantage  customer_segmentation 
december 2012 by jerryking
How Apple outsmarted RIM and Nokia
Oct. 08, 2011| Globe and Mail| ERIC REGULY.

On Tuesday at a tech fair in Finland, Nokia boss Stephen Elop said “the iPhone did something disruptive. It introduced a new level of experience … that all of a sudden everything else was measured against.”

...Apple’s genius was to make it a platform that could feed off a vast ecosystem that included iTunes and a stunning array of apps, from the Angry Birds game to carbon footprint calculators (the list has reached 500,000, should you have some free browsing time this weekend). The ecosystem is like a perpetual motion machine. Its sheer size attracts more and more app developers, who in turn make the ecosystem deeper and richer and ever more attractive to customers....

It was a great compliment to Steve Jobs and Apple. Mr. Jobs died the next day, but left Apple in great shape. It appears that Nokia, RIM and Apple’s other diminished rivals will measure their products against the iPhone for some time. The lesson: Build ecosystems, not just phones.
Eric_Reguly  Apple  RIM  Nokia  ecosystems  lessons_learned  competitive_strategy  platforms  network_effects  virtuous_cycles  winner-take-all 
october 2011 by jerryking
To Beat Foreign Copycats, Sell Services -
February 24, 2011 | BusinessWeek | By Vivek Wadhwa. Don't
compete with imitators by increasing production, argues Henry Chesbrough
in his latest book (Open Services Innovation: Rethinking Your Business
to Grow and Compete in a New Era. ). Instead, lure repeat customers with
services.

Wadhwa is a visiting scholar at University of California-Berkeley,
senior research associate at Harvard Law School, and director of
research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research
Commercialization at Duke University. Follow him on twitter—@vwadhwa
Vivek_Wadhwa  competitive_strategy  competition  book_reviews  copycats  services  HLS 
april 2011 by jerryking
How Foreign Companies Can Compete in China - WSJ.com
AUG. 23, 2010 | WSJ | By DENIS F. SIMON AND LEONARD M. FULD.
Prepare to Be Surprised in China. The 1 thing companies can count on is
that things are constantly changing. There are 3 critical—and perhaps
unexpected—competitive issues to be mastered. FLUIDITY: the biggest
challenge facing foreign companies in China is the constantly shifting
business environment. This fluidity stems from several factors:
Enforcement of rules and regulations in China can vary widely by
location and change without warning; partners routinely abandon
contracts for better offers; and new competitors can emerge and become
major threats almost overnight. And because information doesn't flow
freely, anticipating the direction and thrust of change can be
problematic, even for the most seasoned of managers with yrs. of
experience working in China. WTO FALLOUT: China's accession to the WTO
actually has made competing in China more difficult for foreign
companies. TALENT SHORTAGE:
China  ksfs  WTO  talent_management  competitive_strategy  constant_change  fluidity 
august 2010 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: All's fair in love and war, but hard to measure in business
April 26, 2010 | Globe & Mail | GEORGE STALK JR. "These
laws also mean that the informational "glue" that defined the boundaries
of industries and companies is dissolving, enabling industries to be
redrawn again and again. Companies can no longer rest comfortably in a
market position but must continually cannibalize their own and their
competitors' positions; incumbents must go on the attack to remain
viable....These competitors will not target product-market niches, but
instead define their business as the layers of events and processes that
produce a product or service, as Microsoft and Intel have. This will
happen not only in high-tech and communications but also in industries
such as biotech, media and retail. We already see successful strategies
of "layer mastery" in payments processing, contract electronics
manufacturing, and aircraft leasing. Industries and markets will be
redefined in ways that will make the traditional assessment of "fair"
increasingly difficult.
George_Stalk_Jr.  competitive_landscape  competitive_strategy  Intel  Microsoft  Google  Moore's_Law  Gilder's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Coase's_Law  complacency  layer_mastery  industry_boundaries  offensive_tactics  BCG  kaleidoscopic  informational_advantages  product-market_fit  market_position 
may 2010 by jerryking
"Outsmarting China's Start-Arounds"
07/07/06 | Far Eastern Economic Review | by Steve Ellis and
Orit Gadiesh. The best way for global firms to defend core markets,
then, is to focus on areas where Chinese firms still have a lot to
learn. (1) Most important, of course, is building customer loyalty. (2)
Second is innovation. (3) Third, multinationals need strategies for
developing talent that optimize diversity in skills and experience.
Bain  China  competitive_strategy  multinationals  weaknesses  customer_loyalty 
march 2010 by jerryking
Shielding Intellectual Property - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by BHARAT ANAND and
ALEXANDER GALETOVIC. Below we set out a selection of strategies that
have allowed companies highly dependent on their intellectual property
to live to fight another day.
(1) Nip it in the Bud. Some companies combat infringement by acting
before competitors can catch their breath. Intel famously pre-empts
misappropriation of its core assets by dominating the market long enough
to realize huge profits before reverse engineering, imitation, or
piracy can eat into them.(2) Overwhelm competitors by fashioning
internal operations into an engine of innovation.(3) Make a Bundle. If
one danger of piracy is to drive down a company's prices, why are smart
companies charging nothing for some of their products? (4)Move the
Goalposts. When the threat to their core assets is overwhelming,
companies must take more extreme action -- sometimes expanding into
related businesses.
bundling  competitive_strategy  copycats  core_businesses  counterfeits  Intel  intellectual_property  internal_systems  piracy  pre-emption  property_rights  reverse_engineering  threats 
december 2009 by jerryking
Why America Needs an Economic Strategy
October 30, 2008 | Business Week | by Michael E. Porter. The
Harvard Business School competitiveness guru offers his prescription for
long-term prosperity.
michael_porter  competitiveness_of_nations  competitive_strategy  strategy  industrial_policies 
november 2009 by jerryking

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