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jerryking : concision   20

Opinion | The Whistle-Blower’s Guide to Writing
Sept. 27, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jane Rosenzweig. Ms. Rosenzweig is the director of the Writing Center at Harvard.
active_voice  best_of  brevity  clarity  complaints  concision  focus  high-quality  howto  impeachment  intelligence_analysts  memoranda  persuasion  presentations  purpose  self-organization  topic_sentences  writing  whistleblowing 
september 2019 by jerryking
Barbara Gardner Proctor Became a Role Model for African-American Women
Jan. 25, 2019 | WSJ | By James R. Hagerty.

Barbara Gardner Proctor applied for a Small Business Administration loan to start an advertising firm in 1970, she was asked what her collateral was. “Me,” she replied. That turned out to be solid backing for the loan. Her Chicago-based firm, Proctor & Gardner Advertising Inc., lasted for 25 years and worked for clients including Kraft Foods and Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Though the firm never had more than a couple dozen employees, she became a role model for African-American women staking out positions of influence.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Barbara_Proctor  public_relations  trailblazers  women  Chicago  concision  writing  obituaries 
january 2019 by jerryking
How to Talk to People, According to Terry Gross
Nov. 17, 2018 | The New York Times | By Jolie Kerr.

(1) “Tell me about yourself,” a.k.a the only icebreaker you’ll ever need.
(2) The secret to being a good conversationalist? Curiosity.
(3) Be funny (if you can). “A good conversationalist is somebody who is fun to talk to,” she said. Ms. Gross, it’s worth noting, is very funny. If you can’t be funny, being mentally organized, reasonably concise and energetic will go a long way in impressing people.
(4) Preparation is key. “It helps to organize your thoughts beforehand by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and then reflecting on how you might answer,” think through where your boundaries are, so that you’re not paralyzed agonizing over whether you’re willing to confide something or not.”

In a job interview, organizing your thoughts by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and reflecting on how you might answer can help you navigate if things start to go badly.
(5) Take control by pivoting to something you want to talk about.
(6) Ms. Gross doesn’t want you to dodge questions. But if you’re going to, here’s how: Say, “I don’t want to answer that,” or, if that’s too blunt, hedge with a statement like, “I’m having a difficult time thinking of a specific answer to that.” Going the martyr route with something like, “I’m afraid by answering that I’m going to hurt somebody’s feelings and I don’t want to do that,” is another option.
(7) Terry pays attention to body language. Be like Terry.
(8) When to push back, and when not to.
body_language  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  curiosity  howto  humour  interviews  interview_preparation  job_search  preparation  tips  nonverbal  posture  ice-breakers  concision  Managing_Your_Career  pay_attention 
november 2018 by jerryking
How to garner goodwill and respect | Financial Post
April 2, 2012 Financial Post | Rick Spence.

here are seven ways I believe you can woo your audience:

1. Recognize this opportunity is about understanding what the audience wants to hear. Always ask the meeting organizers about their expectations, and strive to meet them.
2. Be yourself.
3. Explain clearly and concisely what you do. ...Tell your story as simply as possible — who buys your products, and what problems do you solve for them?
4. Look for ways to tell your story visually. Use PowerPoint to show us your premises, your products and your customers. Don’t overdo it; people want to hear from you, not sit through a canned presentation.
5. Brag, but subtly.
6. Be memorable. At least, don’t be boring. Do something unexpected. Bring an unlikely prop, share a secret, describe how your company changed people’s lives, or ask the audience to take action. Leave people with one compelling idea or vision they’ll be talking about long after you sit down.
7. Practise, practise. Read your presentation repeatedly until you are so familiar with it you don’t need your notes.

If you finish early, ask for questions from the floor. Prepare an initial question or two of your own, in case your audience is shy (otherwise, this could be longest minute of your life). You might say, “What I’d be asking me right now is this — ” Follow it with a question that allows you to repeat your theme, with some new “inside” information that enhances it.

Be spontaneous, but never unprepared.
authenticity  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  conferences  goodwill  know_your_audience  preparation  public_speaking  readiness  respect  RetailLoco_2017  Rick_Spence  speeches  spontaneity  storytelling  unprepared  visual_culture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Small words make a big difference: how to ask incisive usability questions for richer results | Loop11
abbreviated “ASK” – which helps me to focus on crafting constructive questions. Here it is:

A. Avoid starting with words like “Are”, “Do”, and “Have”. Questions that start with these type of verbs are a surefire way to nip insights in the bud. It can lead to what’s called a closed question, i.e. something that can literally close a conversation with a “Yes” or “No” answer. While it may be useful to gather this sort of data at times, try instead to open it up. Using open questions, as Changing Minds notes, gives us time to think, reflect, and provide opinions.
S. Start with W. The 5 W’s – i.e. who, what, when, where, and why – are the building blocks for information-gathering. It’s a tool from rhetoric, historically attributed to the Greeks and Romans. Essentially, the 5 W’s help us pull out the particulars. The magic behind them is that none of them can be answered with just a “yes” or “no”, so we’re always going to get a bit more of an expressive answer from subjects.
K. Keep it short. As researchers, we can often let curiosity get the best of us. Excited, we may list out a string of questions, asking more than necessary. By asking more than one question at a time, we ruin the focus of a conversation. We should try to keep our questions short and sweet, so that they may be digested more appropriately.
5_W’s  asking_the_right_questions  brevity  concision  conversations  focus  Greek  howto  incisiveness  insights  open-ended  questions  rhetoric  Romans  small_moves 
december 2014 by jerryking
Why saying less achieves more - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 29 2014,

heed the advice of our high school English teacher on the importance of outlines. Professionals believe that’s beneath them, he notes, particularly before a big pitch or meeting. “It’s a huge mistake to make, especially when you consider the vast amount of information you have to handle, distill, and disseminate in these situations,” he writes.

He suggests trying “mind mapping” to get your ideas organized before writing a report or making a presentation. Usually that involves unleashing the ideas in haphazard fashion on paper to find links and structure.
brevity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  Harvey_Schachter  information_overload  pitches  meetings  mind-mapping  presentations 
september 2014 by jerryking
Advice to Start-ups: Stack the Deck | Inc.com
October 2013 | Inc. Magazine | BY Eric Paley.

As for entrepreneurs, my advice is to discourage your team from writing prose whenever possible. If you want to tell a story, tell it in a compelling and concise narrative slide deck
Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  howto  start_ups  visualization  infographics  concision  storytelling 
october 2013 by jerryking
The Short Sentence as Gospel Truth - NYTimes.com
September 7, 2013, 4:26 pm 193 Comments
The Short Sentence as Gospel Truth
By ROY PETER CLARK
Communicating_&_Connecting  words  ideas  writing  brevity  concision 
september 2013 by jerryking
Grammar is a vital tool for any executive
May 2, 2013 | The Financial Time | by Michael Skapinker.

A reader recently sent me this plea: "I want to write clearly, concisely and correctly. Canyouhelpme?"

There are many guides to writing....
Communicating_&_Connecting  writing  grammar  clarity  concision 
may 2013 by jerryking
How to Write Clearly | TIME.com
By Harvard Business ReviewMarch 06, 2013

Here are three ways to ensure your ideas aren’t misinterpreted:

Adopt the reader’s perspective. Put yourself in the reader’s shoes to assess your clarity. Better yet, ask a colleague to summarize the main points of your draft from a quick read-through.
Keep your language simple. Strive to use short words and sentences. Aim for an average of 20 words or less in each sentence. With every one, ask yourself whether you can say it more briefly.
Show, don’t tell. Be specific enough that readers draw their own conclusions (that match yours, of course), as opposed to expressing your opinions without support and hoping people will agree.
Communicating_&_Connecting  writing  howto  HBR  memoranda  clarity  empathy  misinterpretations  brevity  concision 
march 2013 by jerryking
An Engineer's Blueprints For Writing.
April 13, 2012 | WSJ | By NICK ARVIN.

At root, both engineering and writing are disciplines of combining small things (pieces of steel, or words) to assemble a larger, more pleasing and useful thing (a cruise ship, or "Moby-Dick"). And many of the skills that one learns for engineering a machine carry over into engineering a tale. Here are three.

Steal.
Simplify.
Attend to ambiguity....In engineering, ambiguity is our adversary, because the consequences of uncertainty can be, literally, devastating.

The writer has this attitude too. Language is inherently ambiguous, subject to variables of interpretation...It takes only one confusing sentence to lose a reader's trust forever, so the writer labors through revision after revision, pinning the words ever more precisely.

And yet, at heart, engineers and writers diverge in their attitudes toward ambiguity. A writer works to reduce ambiguity at the sentence level, but he also knows that moral ambiguities lie at the heart of compelling drama and conflict. So the writer will seek out and enlarge these in ways that an engineer never would.
engineering  writing  drama  ambiguities  think_threes  simplicity  blueprints  clarity  words  wordsmiths  brevity  concision 
april 2012 by jerryking
Fine tuning for the perfect pitch
August 3 2005 18:49 | Financial Times | Fergal Byrne.

The pitch is the business plan distilled to its essence: a 10- to 20-minute presentation followed by a question-and-answer session. In some cases, particularly when facing venture capitalists, the Q&A can take place during the pitch....“The business plan is the all-encompassing thesis on why the business is a good opportunity, the pitch is the entrepreneur’s defence of the opportunity,”...
The odds of pitching success are not high: one study of Canadian business angels, for example, suggests almost three-quarters of opportunities were rejected at this stage before the business plan was given serious consideration.
(1) Passion wins hearts and minds.
(2) Less is more. A pitch needs to be concise to whet investors’ appetites. Guy Kawasaki, from Garage Venture, encapsulates his approach in his “10/20/30 rule”. He recommends entrepreneurs present no more than 10 slides, speak for no more than 20 minutes and write in 30-point font size. “The brevity forces an entrepreneur to purify his or her pitch.
(3) Become the product. Entrepreneurs need to apply the same discipline to sell themselves as they do to sell their product,
(4)Solve a problem – segment the market. Products need to solve a specific problem. Too often investors see ideas that are “solutions looking for a problem” or solutions trying to address too many problems.
(5)Master the domain – be candid. Answering investors’ questions during the Q&A is a vital part of the screening process. Entrepreneurs need to respond intelligently, to show they can read people, listen and interact...It is vital that presenters do not become defensive or aggressive during the presentation but respond in a calm, conversational manner.
entrepreneurship  start_ups  pitches  business_planning  angels  Guy_Kawasaki  Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  problem_solving  passions  product-market_fit  specificity  concision  brevity 
november 2011 by jerryking
What John Keats Can Teach a CEO - WSJ.com
APRIL 18, 2011 WSJ By DANNY HEITMAN. The lessons of language
afforded by poetry can be a particularly valuable resource for any
workplace. Can poetry help you get ahead in business, too? "I find
that poetry helps me do my job better," I told my interviewer. "Good
poems teach you how to write simply and clearly, which is a must for
most businesses." I make my living as a newspaperman, where clarity of
expression is especially important. ....Read John Keats, Robert Frost,
Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, and learn how it's done. poets
throughout the ages have routinely confronted the challenge of saying a
lot—and saying it memorably—in small spaces....But maybe it's time that
we reconnect with poetry not as a rarified ritual, but as a vital force
of erudition and insight that can help shape the very texture of our
national life, including corporate culture.
brevity  CEOs  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  humanities  poets  poetry  small_spaces  reconnecting 
april 2011 by jerryking
Corner Office - The 5 Habits of Highly Effective C.E.O.’s
April 16, 2011|NYT|ADAM BRYANT
* Passionate Curiosity.
Share stories re. failures, doubts & mistakes. Ask big-picture
questions re. why things work the way they do & can they be improved
upon? Know people’s back stories, and what they do. Relentless
questioning can lead to spotting new opportunities, or helping
understand subordinates, and how to get them to work together
effectively.
* Battle-Hardened Confidence
The best predictor of behavior is past performance, & that’s why so
many CEOs interview job candidates about how they've dealt with failure.

* Team Smarts
* A Simple Mind-Set
Be concise, get to the point, make it simple. ...There was a time when
simply having certain information was a competitive advantage. Now, in
the Internet era, most people have easy access to the same information.
That puts a greater premium on the ability to synthesize, to connect
dots in new ways and to ask simple, smart questions that lead to
untapped opportunities.
* Fearlessness - Not status quo!
CEOs  commoditization_of_information  concision  confidence  connecting_the_dots  contextual_intelligence  critical_thinking  curiosity  executive_management  fearlessness  interpretation  ksfs  leadership  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  overlooked_opportunities  questions  subordinates  teams  the_big_picture 
april 2011 by jerryking
Why Can't M.B.A. Students Write? - WSJ.com
MARCH 3, 2011 By DIANA MIDDLETON. Students Struggle for Words
Business Schools Put More Emphasis on Writing Amid Employer Complaints
One of the shortest writing assignments at Northeastern is one of the
most frequently bungled. For the Marketing and Customer Value class
students must write, in fewer than 150 words, a compelling email
convincing executives to implement a marketing and pricing strategy.

Students rarely get to the point, says Bruce Clark, writing coordinator
for the M.B.A. program. "The first sentence should begin with, 'The
single most important issue here is.' You'd be amazed how few students
do that," he says.
brevity  business_schools  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  curriculum  incisiveness  linchpins  MBAs  writing  the_single_most_important 
march 2011 by jerryking
How to Wow Your Board of Directors
September 15, 2004 | CIO | Stephanie Overby. here are some tips for making the most of your 15 minutes.

(1) Hone Your Message ; (2) Be Strategic ; (3) Make Visuals Clear and Concise; (4) Brevity Is the Soul of Wit; (5)
Practice, Practice and Then Practice some More; (6) It's Not a Speech; (7) Be Professional but Engaging, (8) Stay Alert
boards_&_directors_&_governance  pitches  howto  ufsc  presentations  clarity  concision 
september 2010 by jerryking
How to Present New Ideas to a Board of Directors | eHow.com
May 5, 2010 | eHow | By Janet Beal, eHow Contributor. A
board of directors, like any working group, needs time and information
to absorb and consider a new idea. Whether you are a department head, a
volunteer, a consultant or a member of the board, some basic guidelines
apply when presenting a new idea. Giving a concise presentation,
anticipating possible questions, providing enough information to permit
decision-making and responding promptly to concerns can make the
difference between acceptance and rejection of your proposal.
pitches  boards_&_directors_&_governance  howto  concision  ideas 
september 2010 by jerryking
Unleashing your inner supernova
Dec 29, 2006 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.8 | by Diane Davies.
Go beyond being a good and find out how to become indispensable. The
indispensable person is focused on success, and has built a reputation
not only for finding solutions, but for having visionary ideas and the
guts to make them reality. Here are four steps for building that
indispensable presence. (1) Own the company. Start thinking like the
company's owner. (2) Develop your presence. Avoid negativity. digest
information quickly and present it clearly and concisely. (3) Build
your reputation with colleagues, other parts of the company, members of
professional associations and the broader community. Be the "go-to"
person. Prepare. (4) Be visionary. Plus: Blowing your own horn
(softly). For Jason Isaacs.
indispensable  owners  up-and-comers  Managing_Your_Career  solutions  solution-finders  personal_branding  reputation  self-promotion  time-management  movingonup  visionaries  mindsets  Pablo_Picasso  negativity_bias  clarity  concision  Jason_Isaacs 
february 2010 by jerryking
How to master the art of thinking quickly on your feet
July 10, 2004 | The Globe and Mail | by Virginia Galt. (1)
Think brevity (2) Think structure (3) Think threes (4) Think movement.
BS3M |
Think brevity

Be aware that your audience values you getting to the point. They value complex ideas being explained simply. Everyone suffers from information overload. If you don't get to the point, you're adding to the overload.

Think structure

Place some kind of framework into your communication so that your audience can see you are organized and have thought about your answer. You have focused your answer into something digestible, something an audience can absorb. It forces you into brevity and clarity.

Think threes

Strong verbal messages require focus. They also require substance. One item is not enough. Seventeen items is too many. Three items is enough for you, and your audience, to retain. Three items forces you to focus on what is really important. It also focuses your audience on only having listen to three. Remember your audience's attention span.

Think movement

Demonstrate your mental ability to be logical, and to move your audience through that logic. What if someone asks a question to which you do not know the answer?
brevity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  frameworks  strategic_thinking  improvisation  filetype:pdf  media:document  public_speaking  speeches  Virginia_Galt  structure  clarity  think_threes 
november 2009 by jerryking

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