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jerryking : congestion   11

Ontario airports must accommodate traffic growth, study says - The Globe and Mail
REG KEENAN - AIRLINE INDUSTRY REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 09, 2017
Ontario  airports  GTAA  congestion  user_growth 
may 2017 by jerryking
Why Starbucks Might Be Innovating Too Fast - Barron's
By Alex Eule Jan. 26, 2017

Big Picture: Starbucks is seeing rapid success with its mobile ordering system, but it might be coming at the expense of in-store service.......The company now has so many customers placing advance orders via smartphones that some of its stores are having trouble keeping up.... “mobile order and pay” made up 7% of U.S. transactions in the latest quarter, up from just 3% a year ago.

But, it turns out, the existing stores haven’t been set up to handle the changing consumer behavior.

(From personal experience, I’ve noticed that Manhattan Starbucks counters are often over-filled with advance orders and those customers walk in and out, while the wait for in-store service is now longer than before.)

Starbucks president and chief operating officer Kevin Johnson, who’s set to become CEO in April, told investors that smartphone order volume has “created a new operational challenge...significant congestion at the handoff point. This congestion resulted in some number of customers who either entered the store or considered visiting a Starbucks store, and then did not complete a transaction.”
innovation  Starbucks  congestion  handoffs  in-store  order_management_system  mobile_applications  smartphones  consumer_behavior  operations  wait_times  brands  large_companies  shortcomings  revenge_effects  the_big_picture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Don’t blame the flu for ER congestion - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 06 2015,

Our emergency rooms are overflowing because of bad planning and misplaced priorities....Influenza is one of the most common and predictable infectious diseases on Earth. In Canada, it spreads from west to east and peaks at roughly the same time each year, near the end of December or early January.

Just as predictably, hospital ERs are besieged, most notably during the Christmas to New Year’s period.

There is more illness in the winter – not just flu, but gastroenteritis, colds and other pathogens spread by coughing and sneezing in close quarters....The larger issue is that our health system does nothing to anticipate and adjust to these problems. On the contrary, it is irresponsibly inflexible.

During the holiday season, retail outlets extend their hours, add additional staff, stock more supplies, and so on. All sensible stuff – Planning 101, if you will – designed to make life easier for the consumer.

Hospitals, and the health system more generally, do the opposite: During the holiday season, they reduce or close a range of services, from hospital beds to primary care clinics, and funnel patients to jam-packed emergency rooms.
adjustments  André_Picard  anticipating  community_care  congestion  emergency_rooms  flu_outbreaks  pathogens  planning  primary-care  healthcare  home_care  hospitals  inflexibility  influenza  overcapacity  overflow 
january 2015 by jerryking
Toronto's summertime roadwork fest the start of a noisier – but sounder – future - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 18 2014

Bloor Street West is getting new sidewalks and asphalt. Dundas and Spadina is being dug up for track and water-main work. Construction fencing is going in and heavy equipment setting up on Eglinton Avenue for the Crosstown light-rail transit project. Then, of course, there is the Gardiner Expressway, now in the midst of a massive rehabilitation that often slows traffic to a crawl even more snail-like than usual. With contractors hurrying to finish projects for next year’s Pan American Games as well, it is feeling like the worst construction season in years.
Eglinton_Crosstown  summertime  Toronto  infrastructure  transit  TTC  congestion  transportation  Metrolinx  traffic_congestion 
july 2014 by jerryking
In Crowded Downtowns, Parking Costs a Premium - WSJ.com
AUGUST 31, 2011 | WSJ | By ROBBIE WHELAN

For Sale: 200 Sq. Feet, 0 BRs, No View: $125k
parking  urban  congestion 
november 2011 by jerryking
Needed: national urban strategy - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 29, 2011|G&M|CAROL WILDING & MERV HILLIER.
Infrastructure has not kept pace with the growth of our cities. Our
report, Toronto as a Global City, documents what any commuter in rush
hour can tell you. Canada’s transportation systems have fallen well
behind those of the rest of the world. Among 23 global cities, 3 of the
bottom 5 positions in the transportation ranking are Canadian (Toronto,
Vancouver & Halifax). The avg. commuter round trip ranges from 67 to
80 minutes. Toronto again is last, longer than NYC, London and LA.
Canada has to do better. If employees and goods can’t get to their
destination on time, productivity will suffer. The quality and
availability of infrastructure directly affect business locations and
operations. In the GTA, congestion now costs the economy $6-B annually;
that will rise to $15-B annually by 2031 without sufficient levels of
investment. Across the country, the cost of underinvestment in just our
transportation infrastructure is even higher.
Toronto  urban  strategy  congestion  commuting  rush-hour  cities  infrastructure  underinvestments  traffic_congestion 
april 2011 by jerryking
Toronto congestion costs Canada $3.3-billion: OECD
Nov. 19, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | by Brodie Fenlon. More
should be done to capitalize on immigrants' international networks in
order to expand Canada's global trade. Cities outside Toronto need to
increase investment in affordable and rental housing that serves
newcomers.
OECD  Toronto  congestion  transit  transportation  planning  immigrants  traffic_congestion 
december 2009 by jerryking
Stuck in traffic? Phone may soon help you escape - The Globe and Mail
Monday, Jan. 15, 2007 | Globe & Mail pg. A12 | by JEFF
GRAY. "In the surprisingly near future, your cellphone may be able to
warn you about a traffic jam ahead, predict precisely how long your
commute home will take, or even recommend an alternative route."
computers essentially take a look at the torrent of data this "pinging"
pours in, using a "triangulation" process based on the time-delay
between pings. Its system figures out which cellphones are moving, where
they are, and how fast they are going. The data are then streamed into a
traffic map and produce precise information on speeds and estimated
travel times not just on major expressways, but on every single road in
cellphone range.
Jeff_Gray  mobile_phones  triangulation  privacy  congestion  competingonanalytics  data_mining  massive_data_sets  location_based_services  metadata  traffic_congestion 
october 2009 by jerryking

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