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NYT Programs – Be a Better Reader in 7 Days
August 7, 2019 | NYT | by Tina Jordan.

(1) Choosing The Right Book
start by asking yourself some questions:
* Do you want to read for enjoyment or for knowledge?
* Do you want to stretch yourself in some way?
* Are you looking for escapism? (There’s nothing wrong with that!)
* Do you want to be part of the cultural conversation around the current “it” book?
* Are you curious about a book that has been atop the best-seller list for months?
However you answer these questions, find a book to focus on this week. You don’t need to buy one: Pluck a book from your shelves at home, borrow from a friend, download a book to your phone from participating libraries or simply swing by a Little Free Library on your way home to see what the reading fates have in store for you.

(2) Make a Reading Plan
A good reading plan is a commitment to keep reading a part of your life. How you go about that will depend a lot on your personality, of course. (what are my greatest challenges: Finding time? Turning off the TV?)

A reading plan doesn’t have to include a schedule — although that’s helpful — but it should include a goal or promise to yourself that will keep you motivated. The more specific and detailed your reading goal is, the better your chances are of reaching it: Goal-setting has been linked to higher achievement.

Neuroscience shows that it helps to put your plan in writing. “People who very vividly describe or picture their goals are anywhere from 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully accomplish their goal.”

So how are you going to finish that book you picked yesterday? As you make your reading plan, consider these factors:

* Set aside the time. Decide how much time you would like to devote to reading every day — a half-hour? an hour? — and where you could carve out that time: on your commute, during your lunch break, in lieu of watching TV. If you think you simply don’t have the time to read, try reading instead of using social media this week. If you keep a calendar — digital or paper — schedule your reading time like you would anything else.
* Allow yourself to quit a book. Nothing will derail you faster than books that don’t hold your interest. You could commit to reading 50 pages of a book before you make a decision. Or you could simply trust your gut: If you realize in a book’s opening pages that it is absolutely not right for you, then put it down and pick up another one, no guilt included.
* Find a reading buddy. Some people find it easier to commit to a reading challenge when they have a friend doing the same thing. Others incorporate book-reading challenges into family time. Feel free to forward this challenge to a friend and have your friend read the same book alongside you.
* Commit to your plan for this book in writing. And then stick to it.

Make a Life-Changing Goal
A reading plan can be for more than just one book; it can be for the rest of your life. Here are some worthy goals to consider:

Read a certain number of books — per week, per month or per year. You can do it on your own, or you can sign up for a reading challenge at Goodreads, Bookish, BookRiot, Popsugar or Reddit. (The nice thing about the Goodreads challenge is that it’s not tied to a Jan. 1 start date; it’s designed to begin at any point during the year.) Don’t be too ambitious: Start small, with manageable goals, and increase them slowly as you go along.
Commit to variety. You want to look forward to your reading time every day, so don’t make every book you pick up an intellectual challenge. Pick lighter titles some of the time, and mix fiction, nonfiction and poetry.
A Little Motivation
Create a (semi) perfect reading environment. One important step on your road to reading better is to find or create an ideal reading environment. A great chair and good lighting come first, of course, but after that, you have to consider the mood-killers of reading. You know what your biggest distractions are, so be ruthlessly honest with yourself about what you need to do to set yourself up for success. If the lure of your phone will tempt you, stash it where you can’t see it (and mute your notifications so that you can’t hear it, either). If you need to tune out chatter on your morning train or the drone of your roommate’s TV, consider noise-blocking headphones.

Related Reading
Quartz: In the time you spend on social media each year, you could read 200 books
That decision to start reading was one of the most important decisions in my life.

The Atlantic: The Adults Who Treat Reading Like Homework
More and more people are making reading goals that most of them will not meet. Here's why.

(3) Read More Deeply
To read more deeply--at a level that stimulates your imagination, the single most important thing to do is take your time. You can’t read deeply if you’re skimming. Set aside at least 15 minutes today to read your book and try this exercise:

Notice if you start to skim or skip sections. Then, backtrack. It can help to use your finger on the page to underline text as you go.
Keep a dictionary nearby. If you’re uncertain about the definition of any words, stop and look them up.
Actively reread. If something is confusing you, reread it. If it’s an especially knotty passage, try to read it aloud or express it in your own words. And if all else fails, mark the troublesome text in some way, whether you highlight it or affix a sticky note. It’s likely that you'll find clarification later in the book, and this way you will be able to come back to it.
Use a highlighter (or sticky notes). Mark the passages of your book that resonate with you. Perhaps the ideas fascinate you, or perhaps you’re struck by the author’s language. When you finish the book, return to those pages to see if you still feel the same way.
Summarize. At the end of your reading session, sum up, in your own words, what you’ve just read. (There’s a reason your teacher asked you questions after every chapter in high school!)

(4) Read More Critically
When you are reading deeply and critically, you should be thinking more often about the book being read; sharpening your deductive reasoning; teasing out connections between different books, and discovering parallels between books and current events.
* Stop and ask yourself questions. Here are a few to try: “What is the author trying to say?” “What is the point of this chapter?” “Could the author have used better examples to buttress her argument here?” “What techniques is the author using to build so much suspense?
* Consider whether you agree with the book or disagree with it. Try to separate your personal beliefs and biases from the book. What questions do you have about what you’re reading? What issues is the book making you rethink or reconsider?
* Think about what makes good writing. It doesn’t matter what kind of book you’re reading — historical nonfiction, a classic, popular fiction.
* Take it Further: does note-taking point to related reading? A a biography of the novelist whose book I'm reading? a nonfiction book about the time period in which the novel takes place? Get ideas by examining the author’s sources in the bibliography and notes (also check out this https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/15/opinion/sunday/the-joy-of-hate-reading.html).

(5) Explore Different Formats
Variety is the spice of reading, right? There’s a great deal of debate over the “best” way to read a book, but there’s no conclusive scientific evidence about any of it. So mix things up. Perhaps start by trying to read out loud, or by asking someone to read a chapter to you. Or turn from print to audio or digital versions of the same story.

Being open to different formats expands your reading possibilities. Having options means you’ll always have a book at your fingertips. Take a break from your current book format to try one of these options:

* Use your cell phone for good. Get a reading app — like Kindle or Overdrive — and download your book digitally. Now, when you’re stuck with time on your hands, spend that time reading instead of skimming through social media.
* Try an audiobook. The audio version of a book can be just as good as print, unless you’re multitasking.
* Mix & match formats. Sync your devices: Listen to a book for a few chapters, then read it digitally for a while, or vice versa.

(6) Read More Socially
Reading may be a solitary endeavor, but once we’re done with a book, most of us want to do the same thing: talk to other people about what we loved, what we hated, what we didn’t understand. No matter where you are in the book you are currently reading, today’s the day to find a place to talk about it.

There are many ways to do that:

* Join an online book club. Unless you’re reading a currently popular book, it’s unlikely you’ll find a local in-person book club to discuss it. But that shouldn’t deter you. You’ll find literally thousands of book clubs on Goodreads, Facebook and other social media sites.
( Find your author on social media. Stephen King, for example, often talks about what he’s reading and what he recommends on Twitter, and so do many other authors; many of them invite lively discussion of books. If you can, try to find the author of your book on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and see what type of conversation he or she is leading.
* Join a local book club or discussion group about your book. If you don’t know of one, call your local library — they will know about the book groups in your area. Hearing what other people think about a book helps expand your own ideas about it.

(7) Enhance Your Post-Book Experience

Here are some simple steps you can take to stay engaged with books, authors and the subjects you’re learning about.

Start a reading journal or reading log. Seeing a list of what you have read will help you branch out. Some people keep a reading log for years.
Create a future book journal. When you hear about a book that interests you, jot down the title. … [more]
advice  connecting_the_dots  critical_thinking  cultural_conversations  deep_learning  goal-setting  howto  questions  reading  self-betterment  self-improvement 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
Be a Potentiator - Mike Lipkin
April 25, 2019 | @ #CAIF2019 | Presentation and speech By Mike Lipkin.

1. Be Self-Savvy: Define your principles. Discern your impact. Play your role. Know what drives you. Know how you’re occurring to others. Know their expectations of you. Know thyself and thy relationship with others.
2. Develop Situational Sensibility: Get out there. Know the trends. Connect the dots. Context is decisive. Whoever understands their environment best wins. So expand your footprint. Study the data until it tells the truth. Anticipate the future by getting there first. Become your peers’ scout. Discover the new world for yourself and other will want to join you.
3. Make a Powerful Promise: Declare your purpose. Express your value proposition. Focus your execution. Know your personal mission. Know the unique benefit you give to others. Act accordingly. So my mission is to turn people into potentiators. My unique benefit is to excite people into remarkable action. I’m executing my promise through motivational messages like this one in any way I can. What are you doing?
4. Become Sublimely Skilled: Practice for real. Become the authority. Make it a pleasure. Whatever your level, be the best at that level. Learn from every experience. Communicate your knowledge with conviction. Light others up with your joie de vivre.
5. Build Robust Resilience: Interpret to win. Be prolific. Train like an athlete. We’re only as good as the stories that we tell ourselves. Make whatever happens meaningful. Do more things. Put the odds on your side. And train, train, train. Stamina is the rocket fuel of champions.
6. Grow Courageous Creativity: Unleash your imagination. Experiment like Edison. Talk, listen, learn. Dare to dream then declare your dream. Turn it into reality by trying something new. Fail fast until you fly high. Get in front of people and give them great conversation. Enrich their perspective while you expand yours.
7. Be Fanatically Faithworthy: Commit to your commitments. Come through in the crunch. Be the best you can be, every day. If you say it, do it. Make your word the one thing that others can always depend on. Become the go-to-person in a crisis. And, whatever happens, bring your A-Game every time. You can’t always be the best, but you can always be the best you can be that day.
8. Create Close Connections: Give First. Open yourself up. Become an insider. Generosity pays big dividends. Show what you can give them and others will show you the money. Get up, close and personal. Become integral to others’ wellbeing. If you build their trust, they will pay it forward all the way back to you.
9. Communicate Like a Champion: Say it like you mean it. Talk their language. Connect them to their purpose. How you say what you say is as important as what you say. Let your authenticity shine through but inject it with your passion. Be the reason why other people rediscover why they make a difference.
10. Cause Bold Breakthroughs: Own it. Celebrate the struggle. Finish like a professional. It’s not about the title. It’s about your skin in the game. It’s about taking on the responsibility for everyone else’s success, no matter what. You can’t always win, but you can always play to win. It’s meant to be hard. The pain is the price you pay to be a potentiator. Close strong and the force will be with you.
breakthroughs  CAIF  commitments  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  execution  inspiration  It's_up_to_me  motivations  purpose  self-made  serving_others  skin_in_the_game  torchbearers  value_propositions  Mike_Lipkin  code_switching 
april 2019 by jerryking
Every Company Is Now a Tech Company
Dec. 4, 2018 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

There was a time when the primary role of leaders at most companies was management. The technology required to do the work of a company could be bought or siloed in an “IT department,” treated more as a cost center than a source of competitive advantage.

But now we’ve entered a period of upheaval, driven by connectivity, artificial intelligence and automation. The changes affect the world of business so profoundly that every company is now a tech company. But now companies born before the first internet bubble also must realize they can no longer function as non-tech businesses......The question is, how does a non-tech company become a tech company quickly? Increasingly, the answer is bringing tech talent into the highest executive ranks, adding deeply knowledgeable and indispensable “technical co-founders” long after the company was founded......To put it another way: When faced with a competitor like Amazon, do you do as Walmart did, and invest heavily in tech firms and technical knowledge? Or do you go the way of Sears…into bankruptcy court?

In August 2016, Walmart announced it would acquire e-commerce startup Jet.com for $3.3 billion, the largest ever deal of an old-line bricks-and-mortar company buying an e-commerce company. The acquisition was about a transfusion of new minds as much as Jet’s technology, which was far ahead of Walmart’s online operation at the time....Mr. Lore is now chief of e-commerce at Walmart......Walmart’s e-commerce business revenue grew 43% in the last quarter alone....Wal-Mart is successfully pursuing a “second-mover strategy” against Amazon....Things don’t always go this smoothly. In fact, when well-established companies acquire tech-savvy startups in order to bring aboard engineers and executives--acqui-hires-- it’s usually a disaster.....Within the first three years after an acquisition, 60% of employees at a startup leave......That rate of turnover is twice that of employees hired the old-fashioned way. What’s worse, the employees who leave tend to be the most aggressive and entrepreneurial—and more likely to launch a competing startup.....For large companies stuck between the rock of disruption and the hard place of acquiring startups that can’t hold on to key employees, what’s to be done?[sounds like a cultural clash] John Chambers, who was chief executive at Cisco for more than 20 years, where he oversaw 180 acquisitions, has some answers. In his new book, “Connecting the Dots,” Mr. Chambers outlines some rules. For one, corporate cultures should align. Also, it helps if the company you’re buying already has significant traction in the market..... it’s essential to promote the leaders of acquired companies into your own ranks. Mr. Chamber’s rule at Cisco was that a third of the company’s leaders should be promoted from within, a third should be recruited from outside, and a third should come from acquisitions. .......As the competitive landscape continues to change and technology becomes ever more essential to how business is done, investments that might have seemed too risky a few years ago now may sometimes turn out to be the best path to survival.
acquihires  artificial_intelligence  automation  Amazon  books  Christopher_Mims  connecting_the_dots  CTOs  Cisco  cultural_clash  digital_savvy  e-commerce  Jet  John_Chambers  large_companies  post-deal_integration  reinvention  silo_mentality  technology  Wal-Mart 
december 2018 by jerryking
Trump, Niger and Connecting the Dots
OCT. 31, 2017 | The New York Times | Thomas L. Friedman.

It is easy to ignore the recent story of four U.S. servicemen killed in Niger, the giant state in central Africa, because the place is so remote and the circumstances still so murky. That would be a mistake. Niger highlights a much larger problem — just how foolish, how flat-out dumb President Trump is behaving.

Trump is a person who doesn’t connect dots — even when they’re big, fat polka dots that are hard to miss. ..... To understand why groups affiliated with ISIS and Al Qaeda are popping up in that region of central Africa, you have to connect a lot of dots, and recognize the linkages between a number of different problems....As defense systems expert Lin Wells once put it: To ameliorate problems in places like Niger, you must never think in the box. You must never think out of the box. “You must always think without a box.”

Why? Because what is destabilizing all of these countries in the Sahel region of Africa and spawning terrorist groups is a cocktail of climate change, desertification — as the Sahara steadily creeps south — population explosions and misgovernance.....Desertification is the trigger, and climate change and population explosions are the amplifiers. The result is a widening collapse of small-scale farming, the foundation of societies all over Africa. And that collapse is leading to a rising tide of “economic migrants, interethnic conflicts and extremism,”......Trump’s response to this reality? It’s to focus solely on using the U.S. military to kill terrorists in Africa while offering a budget that eliminates U.S. support for global contraception programs; appointing climate-change deniers to all key environmental posts; pushing coal over clean energy; and curbing U.S. government climate research.

In short, he’s sending soldiers to fight a problem that is clearly being exacerbated by climate and population trends, while eliminating all our tools to mitigate these trends.
That’s just stupid, reckless and irresponsible — and it evinces no ability to connect the dots or think without a box......Nothing Trump ever says has a second paragraph. His whole shtick is just a first paragraph: Build a wall, tear up the Iran deal, tear up TPP, defeat ISIS, send troops to Niger and Afghanistan to kill terrorists, kill climate policy, kill family planning, cut taxes, raise military spending. Every box just marks an applause line he needed somewhere to get elected. Nothing connects — and we will pay for that.
Donald_Trump  Niger  ISIS  climate_change  Tom_Friedman  destabilization  Africa  connecting_the_dots  the_Sahara  terrorism  the_Sahel  misgovernance  desertification  sub-Saharan_Africa  weak_states  failed_states  farming  population_growth  U.S._military  mismanagement 
november 2017 by jerryking
Bloomberg Businessweek
See the connections others don't make. Hear the buzz before it starts. Navigate the currents they don't follow. Know the plays ahead of the game. Know what matters and why (secrets, discernment).
quotes  connecting_the_dots  ahead_of_the_curve  sophisticated  discernment  secrets  what_really_matters 
august 2017 by jerryking
‘An Anthropologist on Wall Street’ — Cultural Anthropology
Tett, Gillian. "‘An Anthropologist on Wall Street’." Theorizing the Contemporary, Cultural Anthropology website, May 16, 2012.

Anthropology can be extremely useful for understanding the contemporary financial world because of all the micro-level communities—or ‘tribes’ to use the cliché term—that are cropping up around the financial system....The event pulled together bankers from all over. They staged formalized rituals with PowerPoint presentations, but also engaged in informal rituals like chitchat in the wings.

As they came together and talked, these bankers were creating a network of ties. But they were also inventing a new language they felt made them distinctive from everyone else. The way they talked about credit was to emphasize the numbers and to quite deliberately exclude any mention of social interaction from the debate and discussion. In the first couple of days I sat there, they almost never mentioned the human borrower who was at the end of that securitization chain. They were also very exclusive. There was a sense that ‘we alone have mastery over this knowledge’....Part two of the CDO gospel was that bankers had had this sudden inspiration that they should stop concentrating credit risk and find ways to scatter it across the system....Looking back there were many elements of securitization that were evidently flawed. The tools bankers were using to disburse risk across the system were themselves very opaque and complex. The very way by which they disbursed risk was actually introducing new risk into the system.......fundamental contradiction at the very heart of the system that almost nobody spotted. Why not? To put it crudely, because there were too few anthropologists, using basic anthropological techniques, trying to understand what was going on. Having an anthropological perspective is very useful. The very nature of anthropology is to try to connect up the dots. That’s something that most modern bureaucrats, most bankers, and most company executives are not able to do, precisely because they’re so darn busy running around in their silos.
Wall_Street  Gillian_Tett  anthropologists  financial_system  securitization  finance  ethnographic  insights  CDOs  connecting_the_dots  cultural_anthropology  anthropology  tribes  silo_mentality 
march 2017 by jerryking
Connecting Trump’s Dots to Russia - The New York Times
Nicholas Kristof MARCH 9, 2017
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Nicholas_Kristof  Donald_Trump  Russia  connecting_the_dots 
march 2017 by jerryking
Connecting Trump’s Dots - The New York Times
But Trump is a dot exploiter, not connector. He made a series of reckless, unconnected promises, not much longer than tweets, to get elected, and now he’s just checking off each one, without thinking through the linkages among them or anticipating second-order effects.

It is a great way to make America weak — and overstretched — again.
Tom_Friedman  Donald_Trump  incoherence  recklessness  connecting_the_dots 
february 2017 by jerryking
Abe Ankumah of Nyansa: Are You a ‘First Principle’ Thinker? - The New York Times
Corner Office
By ADAM BRYANT DEC. 2, 2016

We tend to be very “first principle” thinkers. What I mean by that is when you’re trying to solve a problem, you start by trying to understand the essence of the problem, rather than starting with what the answer should be and then working your way to justifying it.

So it’s all about making sure that everyone understands the problem we’re trying to solve. And to do that, you have to maintain a broader perspective and listen very carefully to people.

I have one-on-ones with every single person on the team and then connect the dots. So I ask a lot of questions and build a mental model of the outline of what we need to do.
data  African-Americans  HBS  engineering  Caltech  Ghanian  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  first_principle  mental_models 
december 2016 by jerryking
Peter's Principles, Market Research and Forecasting Article | Inc.com
Excerpts and thoughts on "Adventures of a Bystander"

Drucker looks for simplicity but likes to convey complexity. He loves simplicity but realizes that getting there means making connections: to the past, to related fields. He answers questions by trotting through history, art, science. Listening to him, you learn not just the answer but also how to make connections between disparate subjects and thus deepen your understanding. It makes you, the listener, more valuable as an adviser and teacher.

History is Drucker's primary tool for complexifying. "I'm not a professional historian," he says, "but I've learned that nothing helps me as much in my work as a little bit of historical knowledge about a country, technology, or industry. Every few years I pick another major topic and read in it for three years. It's not long enough to make me an expert, but it's long enough to understand what the field is all about. I've been doing this for 60 years."
Peter_Drucker  advice  simplicity  complexity  consigliere  history  interconnections  connecting_the_dots  contextual  industry_expertise 
april 2015 by jerryking
Intellectual maestro craves connections as NACO’s music director - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

The energetic Englishman’s conversation, during a short visit to Toronto, is full of the language of linkage and cross-reference. Just about everything good can be made better, in his view, if the connections between things, people and ideas are stronger... if classical music isn’t reaching parts of the population, he says, it’s because those who perform aren’t doing enough to make links between the music, its history and the way we live today. “I only really connect to a piece of music when I read around it, I mean the broad social context.”

Connecting dots is a familiar theme in the arts and in arts promotion these days, but Shelley is quite willing to chase it into the corners, as they say in hockey. ....tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem (Daniel Doctoroff--Bloomberg's guy)
music  Communicating_&_Connecting  Ottawa  cultural_institutions  connecting_the_dots  artists  orchestras_&_symphonies  classical_music  CEOs  sense-making  contextual  cross-pollination  interconnections 
march 2015 by jerryking
Getting Started in ‘Big Data’ - The CFO Report - WSJ
February 4, 2014 | WSJ |by JAMES WILLHITE.

executives and recruiters, who compete for talent in the nascent specialty, point to hiring strategies that can get a big-data operation off the ground. They say they look for specific industry experience, poach from data-rich rivals, rely on interview questions that screen out weaker candidates and recommend starting with small projects.

David Ginsberg, chief data scientist at business-software maker SAP AG , said communication skills are critically important in the field, and that a key player on his big-data team is a “guy who can translate Ph.D. to English. Those are the hardest people to find.”

Along with the ability to explain their findings, data scientists need to have a proven record of being able to pluck useful information from data that often lack an obvious structure and may even come from a dubious source. This expertise doesn’t always cut across industry lines. A scientist with a keen knowledge of the entertainment industry, for example, won’t necessarily be able to transfer his skills to the fast-food market.

Some candidates can make the leap. Wolters Kluwer NV, a Netherlands-based information-services provider, has had some success in filling big-data jobs by recruiting from other, data-rich industries, such as financial services. “We have found tremendous success with going to alternative sources and looking at different businesses and saying, ‘What can you bring into our business?’ ” said Kevin Entricken, the company’s chief financial officer.
massive_data_sets  analytics  data_scientists  cross-industry  recruiting  howto  poaching  plain_English  connecting_the_dots  storytelling  SAP  Wolters_Kluwer  expertise  Communicating_&_Connecting  unstructured_data  war_for_talent  talent  PhDs  executive_search  artificial_intelligence  nontraditional 
june 2014 by jerryking
Meet Bloomberg's data-driven Daniel Doctoroff
Aug. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOANNA SLATER.

Mr. Doctoroff’s job, as deputy mayor for economic development, would include rebuilding the site and pushing ahead with projects envisaged in the Olympic bid....Founded by Mr. Bloomberg in 1982, the firm grew into a global juggernaut that disrupted every field it touched, from market data to financial journalism....Mr. Doctoroff had a yen for precision and a belief in the power of data. To eliminate clutter on his desk, he never touches a piece of paper twice. “I either delegate something, I dump it, or I deal with it,”...Mr. Doctoroff’s mission at Bloomberg is twofold. The first is to sell more terminals – a subscription service that costs more than $20,000 (U.S.) a year per person and offers access to an expanding universe of data, analytical tools and news. Last year was a tough one for terminal sales; Wall Street firms continued to shed staff in what Mr. Doctoroff describes as “the fourth year of post-financial crisis adjustment.”

The second task is to lead the company into other areas and make those investments pay off. Bloomberg has launched what it hopes will become indispensable data products for fields like law and government and also for back-office personnel within finance. Then there’s the media business, which includes a news service, television, radio and magazines, among them Bloomberg Businessweek, which was purchased in 2009. Businessweek still isn’t profitable, but it’s losing much less money than it used to. The magazine, like the rest of the news operation, serves another objective in the Bloomberg ecosystem, Mr. Doctoroff said: heightening the firm’s profile so it can attract more market-moving scoops, which in turn helps to sell more terminals....On his career path: I believe we’re all endowed with a very small set of narrow skills that make us unique. You’ve got to find what that is. Most often what you truly understand makes you unique is something that you’re also going to build passion around. For me – and I didn’t really discover this until I was in my 40s, the line that connected the dots … [is] seeing patterns in numbers that enable me to tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem. So whether it is helping a candidate get elected or doing a road show for a company, getting a project done in New York or hopefully setting a vision for a company, it’s that narrow skill.
New_York_City  Bloomberg  data_driven  precision  CEOs  organizational_culture  Wall_Street  private_equity  digital_media  disruption  privately_held_companies  Michael_Bloomberg  fin-tech  journalism  pattern_recognition  career_paths  gtd  mayoral  Daniel_Doctoroff  storytelling  product_launches  sense-making  leadership  insights  leaders  statistics  persuasion  ratios  analogies  back-office  connecting_the_dots  scoops  financial_journalism  financial_data  special_sauce  non-routine  skills 
august 2013 by jerryking
L. Gordon Crovitz: White Hats vs. Black Hats - WSJ.com
August 4, 2013 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.

The NSA says 42 terror-related plots have been disrupted, thanks to its surveillance program.

In the language of computer hacking, the good guys are "white hats," who identify weaknesses in systems so they can be fixed. "Black hats" are the ones who take advantage of weaknesses in systems.......A white-hat hacker would point out what happens when intelligence agencies fail to monitor communications data. Gen. Alexander pointed out that the 9/11 plots succeeded because of avoidable intelligence failures, citing the example of an intercept of a phone call from Yemen involving one of the 9/11 hijackers. "We didn't have the tools and capabilities to see that he was actually in California," Gen. Alexander said. "The intelligence community failed to connect those dots."
black_hats  NSA  security_&_intelligence  surveillance  9/11  privacy  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  terrorism  U.S._Cyber_Command  connecting_the_dots  white_hats 
august 2013 by jerryking
A Recipe to Enhance Innovation - NYTimes.com
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Published: November 15, 2012

it is worth thinking hard about how to make diverse teams effective, and how people who straddle two cultural worlds can succeed....In “Connecting the Dots Within: Creative Performance and Identity Integration,” Chi-Ying Cheng, of Singapore Management University, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and Fiona Lee, also at the University of Michigan, argue that ethnic minorities, and women in male-dominated professions, are most creative when they have found a way to believe that their “multiple and conflicting social identities are compatible.”... Their conclusion was that people who have found a way to reconcile their two identities — Asian-Americans, for example, or women who work in male-dominated jobs like engineering — are the best at finding creative solutions to problems..... In other words, if the world around us tells us our dual identities are compatible, we will believe that, and act accordingly. If female engineers work in a company that treats their gender as a virtue, they will do better. If Asian-Americans live in a community that celebrates both aspects of their identity, they will be more effective.

America’s rainbow coalition won at the ballot box this month, but in other settings, the nation has become a little weary of diversity-cheering movements like multiculturalism and even explicit feminism. Dr. Cheng’s work suggests that cynicism may be misplaced. Diversity can work, but we have to work at it.
Chrystia_Freeland  demographic_changes  ethnic_communities  diversity  cross-cultural  books  teams  innovation  connecting_the_dots  dual-consciousness  heterogeneity 
december 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  open-ended  persuasion  statistics  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  storytelling  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  Andrew_McAfee  numeracy  insights  sense-making  jobs  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
How to Make Your Co-Workers Smarter
May 11, 2011| BNET | By Jessica Stillman.
Learn about people’s passions. You can’t connect with others if you
don’t know anything about them. So, who are they? Ask lots of questions.
What inspires or drives them? What are their goals? What have they
learned recently?
Get over yourself. Flip your focus from yourself to the other
person. When you say to yourself, “He hates me” or “She thinks I’m
stupid,” you are making someone else’s behavior about you [jk: emotional mastery]. Change your
perspective. For instance, if you are thinking, “I want her to think I’m
smart” flip your focus to “I want her to be smart.”
Make connections. When interacting with small groups, be a
“connector” by calling out each person’s unique talents or strengths.
Help people connect the dots and see that two or more heads really are
better than one.
Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  co-workers  curiosity  emotional_mastery  empowerment  howto  ice-breakers  passions  questions  serving_others  smart_people  teams  workplaces 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Paradoxes of Intelligence Reform :
March 10, 2003 The New Yorker by Malcolm Gladwell
Connecting the dots is easier said than done in retrospect. intentions
didn’t form a pattern. They formed a Rorschach blot. What is clear in
hindsight is rarely clear before the fact.
security_&_intelligence  pattern_recognition  Malcolm_Gladwell  connecting_the_dots  military_intelligence  sense-making  hindsight 
may 2011 by jerryking
Corner Office - The 5 Habits of Highly Effective C.E.O.’s
April 16, 2011|NYT|ADAM BRYANT
* Passionate Curiosity.
Share stories re. failures, doubts & mistakes. Ask big-picture
questions re. why things work the way they do & can they be improved
upon? Know people’s back stories, and what they do. Relentless
questioning can lead to spotting new opportunities, or helping
understand subordinates, and how to get them to work together
effectively.
* Battle-Hardened Confidence
The best predictor of behavior is past performance, & that’s why so
many CEOs interview job candidates about how they've dealt with failure.

* Team Smarts
* A Simple Mind-Set
Be concise, get to the point, make it simple. ...There was a time when
simply having certain information was a competitive advantage. Now, in
the Internet era, most people have easy access to the same information.
That puts a greater premium on the ability to synthesize, to connect
dots in new ways and to ask simple, smart questions that lead to
untapped opportunities.
* Fearlessness - Not status quo!
CEOs  leadership  teams  ksfs  contextual_intelligence  Managing_Your_Career  executive_management  curiosity  questions  mindsets  concision  confidence  critical_thinking  overlooked_opportunities  interpretation  connecting_the_dots  fearlessness  the_big_picture  subordinates 
april 2011 by jerryking
Why Networking Isn't About Achieving Personal Gain
2004 | Wall Street Journal | By Barbara Moses. Good networkers
extend their connections beyond their immediate professional boundaries.
They cultivate relationships with people who know how to get things
done... They enjoy bringing together interesting people and ideas, and
they are as proud of making things happen for others as they are of how
many people are listed in their personal organizers. Skilled networkers
don't view staying connected with others as networking, seeing it
instead as exchanging information. The best networkers rarely expect a
personal payoff...having benefited from their contacts' kindness and
help, they`re seeking opportunities to reciprocate and hope they'll do
the same...Adept networkers are huge information synthesizers who can
see connections that aren't obvious between people, things and ideas.
From the initial presenting issue, they can identify a higher idea the
other person might not have seen and make creative referrals...they're
idea generators.
personal_connections  Barbara_Moses  connecting_the_dots  networking  tips  serving_others  Communicating_&_Connecting  idea_generation  ideas  non-obvious  latent  hidden  information_synthesis  referrals  value_added  packaging  personal_payoffs 
december 2010 by jerryking
Voice of Influence
Oct. 07, 2010| TIME| By Richard Stengel. Fareed's worldview
comes in part from being a naturalized American citizen who was born in
Bombay and grew up outside the U.S. in what was then decidedly the
developing world. His academic background — a B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D.
in political science from Harvard — also gives him a set of analytical
tools that few have. "Most journalists ask the 'what' question very
well," he says. "My training is to ask the 'why.' "s. "I'm not in
journalism to play parlor games with elites. I want to help people
become more thoughtful and engaged about the world." ...Fareed is one of
the foremost public intellectuals of our time. He connects the dots on
foreign policy, politics, the economy and the larger culture to make
sense of the world's most important ideas and trends. And he does it
with a subtlety that is nevertheless clear and accessible. For him,
politics and international affairs are complex and gray, not black and
white.
Fareed_Zakaria  profile  sense-making  foreign_policy  politics  economics  trends  popular_culture  public_discourse  journalism  public_intellectuals  connecting_the_dots  engaged_citizenry  worldviews  5_W’s 
october 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Connecting the Dots Isn’t Enough, Adobe’s Chief Says - Question - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2009 | New York Times | Interview with Shantanu
Narayen, president and chief executive of Adobe Systems, was conducted
and condensed by Adam Bryant.
CEOs  leadership  Adobe  Apple  goal-setting  teams  hiring  time-management  failure  connecting_the_dots 
july 2009 by jerryking

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