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jerryking : constituencies   15

National Black Caucus of State Legislators: Preparing for the Age of Trump
BY: CHARLES D. ELLISON
Posted: December 4, 2016

As bad as that may look, however, don’t sleep on the NBCSL. With those numbers, none of the above eliminates the NBCSL’s truly massive importance as an august national body of black political power. Even if we can’t link to its website at the moment, it still manages to somehow connect and coordinate these 700 legislators, occasionally corralling crucial policy coordination on a wide range of issues when needed.

Black state legislators are like a first line of defense standing between national sanity and the global tempest that is Donald Trump, plus a fully decked GOP Congress. Need to change police-conduct standards? Call your local black state rep or senator because that’s in their wheelhouse. When Trump’s proposed $1 trillion infrastructure plan rolls out and trickles to states, black state officials will be key on oversight. And issues like education reform, charter schools and vouchers can’t really move without black state legislators’ eyes on them....."expressing frustration that the census woefully undercounts the national black population and that, unfortunately, many black constituents don’t help the situation by avoiding it. The significance of redistricting and racial gerrymandering cannot be underestimated: It plays a central role in structurally consolidating Republican political power to a gargantuan and potentially tyrannical degree."....New Jersey state Sen. Ron Rice (D-Newark), argued that’s why black elected officials must press aggressively for more collaboration among the state-, local- and federal-level groups, like NBCSL, the Congressional Black Caucus, the African American Mayors Association and the National Black Caucus of Locally Elected Officials. “This day and age, we can’t be playing around,” said Rice.

“We have to acknowledge the need to coordinate on a number of issues, like jobs, crime, education, and know what the other is doing,”
African-Americans  politicians  redistricting  constituencies  census  under-representation  undercounting  gerrymandering  organizational_capital  collaboration  coordination  policymakers  policymaking 
december 2016 by jerryking
Recharging the Canadian right - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 18, 2016

As Henry Kissinger once observed, politicians in office use up their intellectual, human and organizational capital rather than adding to it. Time out of office, wisely employed, can be used to restock the cupboard....

.....This is not to say that personal attractiveness and communications capabilities should be ignored in the recruitment of the next generation of political leaders. But if the aim of conservatives is not only to recharge the right politically, but also to be better able to govern the country as a result, putting all the renewal eggs in the charismatic leader basket would be a mistake for both conservatism and the country....
1. Greater recognition of the character traits that Canadians want to see in their elected officials – openness, honesty, transparency, integrity, compassion, humility – and making the possession of such traits a much more important factor in recruiting candidates, leaders and staff.

2. More clearly embracing those Canadian values – such as freedom, responsibility, equality of opportunity, stewardship, respect for life, democratic accountability – that conservatives want to strengthen and apply more rigorously to public policy.

3. Continue to strongly communicate the importance of trade liberalization, public-spending constraints, balanced budgets, debt reduction and tax relief.

4. Undertake a fresh round of policy development to strengthen the creative application of conservative values and principles to those areas where conservatives are, rightly or wrongly, seen to be weak or disinterested, such as poverty, inequality, health care, education, environment, science and culture.

5. Investing heavily in training conservative-oriented Canadians for more effective participation in the country’s political processes; providing more and better training for volunteers, constituency executives, campaign managers and candidates.

6. With respect to all of the above, consulting and involving ordinary Canadians at every stage – not just party insiders and elites.
Preston_Manning  conservatism  revitalization  intellectual_capital  human_capital  constituencies  rebuilding  think_tanks  political_infrastructure  institutions  politicians  institution-building  right-of-center  Canadian  values  training  Henry_Kissinger  organizational_capital  renewal  character_traits  charisma  APNSA  right-wing 
january 2016 by jerryking
Abused ravines are loose thread in urban fabric - The Globe and Mail
JOHN BARBER
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 10, 2002

"There is nothing quite like the ravines anywhere: no other city has so much nature woven through its urban fabric in that way," Robert Fulford wrote in a typical example.

"The ravines are to Toronto what canals are to Venice, hills are to San Francisco and the Thames River is to London. They are the heart of the city's emotional geography, and understanding Toronto requires an understanding of the ravines."

Any serious attempt to understand the ravines would probably include the fact that they are an environmental disaster, hopelessly degraded by generations of neglect, and getting steadily worse despite the green boosterism.

It might also notice that the ravines are not woven through the urban fabric in the least; rather, they are emphatically set apart from it, even suppressed by it. At least the hills in San Francisco make an impression; in Toronto, you can drive over a 100-foot bridge and never know it.

It's also possible that this bizarre dislocation -- two worlds, one right on top of the other, yet almost entirely separate -- might help explain why the ravines are still so abused: They have no constituency.
City_Hall  constituencies  emotional_geography  hidden  iconic  John_Barber  nature  overlay_networks  parks  ravines  Toronto  urban  wilderness 
november 2015 by jerryking
Time to rebuild conservatism in Alberta - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 14 2015
Conservatism in Alberta, therefore, needs to be rebuilt provincially from the bottom up – rediscovering and recommitting itself to its fundamental values and principles, developing a conservative platform that applies those values and principles to the issues of the day, and engaging in constituency rebuilding and advocacy campaigns to restore its relevance and influence with Alberta electors.

In the federal arena, this process took more than 10 years to complete after the collapse of the federal PC Party in the 1993 national election. It culminated in, but did not begin with, an effort to “unite the right” at the party level, but much ground work had to be done before that effort was even feasible, let alone advisable. Alberta is a much smaller and dynamic political arena than the national political arena, so the deconstruction and rebuilding of conservatism provincially should not be nearly as long or difficult as it was federally....
With falling oil prices, Alberta’s star economic player is still in the game but playing hurt. Now is the time for other sectors – agriculture and forestry, the service and knowledge sectors, whose growth and export potential is not limited by pipeline capacity, exporters with a strong focus on Asia – to accept the challenge, “up their game” and provide more of the leadership Alberta’s economy urgently requires.
conservatism  Alberta  Preston_Manning  Wildrose  rebuilding  right-of-center  constituencies  right-wing 
may 2015 by jerryking
Capital Journal: Republicans Grapple With the Rand Paul Conundrum - WSJ
By GERALD F. SEIB
Updated June 2, 2014

Rand Paul is, of course, the junior senator from Kentucky and a rising star in his party. He mixes tea-party appeal with the libertarian instincts he inherited from his father, former Rep. Ron Paul .

He attracts some constituencies other Republicans have a hard time reaching—college-age voters, in particular—and is diligently trying to reach out to minority groups that have slipped further from the grasp of others in his party. Indeed, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, an organization not known for its close relations with Republicans, invited him to appear at its July annual meeting, Mr. Paul's office says, though a scheduling conflict likely will prevent him from appearing....Mr. Paul doesn't consider himself an isolationist, of course. In fact, in an op-ed written earlier this year for the Washington Post, he essentially described the debate between isolationism and interventionism as a phony one: "False choices between being everywhere all of the time and nowhere any of the time are fodder for debate on Sunday morning shows or newspaper columns. Real foreign policy is made in the middle...."
Gerald_Seib  Rand_Paul  GOP  U.S.foreign_policy  millennials  NAACP  isolationism  false_choices  constituencies  conundrums 
march 2015 by jerryking
The PNC when in power did not amend the constitution to protect African Guyanese should it ever lose office - - Georgetown, Guyana
JUNE 25, 2011 | Stabroek News | M. Maxwell.

"Political power in this country is a zero-sum game thanks to the PNC and more pointedly to Forbes Burnham, who replaced a good (not great, but good) constitution with a monstrosity in 1980. ....The PNC had sufficient opportunity from at least 1985 with his demise to before the election of 1992 to implement constitutional and institutional reform that would protect African Guyanese and other minorities in the future following free and fair elections where ethnic voting would put the heavily Indian-supported PPP into power for a long time. ....However, the PNC failed African Guyanese in particular and Guyanese in general. A great opportunity to rewrite the constitution to benefit the minorities of this country of minorities was missed. The presidency continues to destroy this nation. ...Instead of beneficial change to protect its constituency and the Guyanese public in general, some charlatans who sat atop the PNC heap in 1992 ran for the hills leaving the African masses with no constitutional or institutional protection against exactly what they complain of today. It was a classic act of the shallow thinking, missing foresight and ineptitude
Afro-Guyanese  constituencies  constitutions  Guyana  failure  foresight  history  ineptitude  letters_to_the_editor  LFSB  minorities  minority_rights  PNC  zero-sum_games 
september 2014 by jerryking
Holman Jenkins: What the Taxi Wars Teach - WSJ
Aug. 19, 2014 | WSJ | Holman Jenkins.

"wasn't the arrival of ride-sharing apps supposed to obliterate the traditional taxi industry? It turns out the new operators have been expanding the pie more than gobbling it up, creating new rides where taxi service was scarce (such as New York's outer boroughs), luring users out of private cars and off buses, and enabling trips that previously wouldn't have been taken at all.

In Chicago, taxi medallions appear to have stopped trading amid current uncertainty but are likely to end up holding much of their value. The traditional conspicuously yellow taxi (as in New York) that can be summoned with the raise of a hand is likely to find that its highly regulated niche survives even as new options proliferate. Value still adheres to the old medallions not least because of the untapped scope for efficiency improvement, ignored till now.

America is an interesting place, a society ruled by organized interest groups where nonetheless new things can happen. It's true that taxi operators have used regulation and litigation to slow the newcomers and force compromise with regulatory edicts on insurance coverage, vehicle age and driver training.

Laws exist and can't just be ignored. Organized interests like taxicab companies have every incentive to make noise about everything, demanding concessions.

Yet despite certain tropes about our dysfunctional political system, politicians also have every incentive to avoid maximalist positions on behalf of constituents, seeking to expand the groups they can make happy."
Holman_Jenkins  taxis  Uber  Lyft  medallions  mobile_applications  lobbying  ride_sharing  constituencies  interest_groups  upstarts  politicians 
august 2014 by jerryking
Big Data makes for meaner politics - The Globe and Mail
Konrad Yakabuski

The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Jan. 18 2014
What do you get when you combine modern technology with old-style politics? Hillary's wrath, that's what.

News that top aides to Hillary Clinton used a computer spreadsheet to compile a "hit list" of disloyal Democrats after her devastating loss to Barack Obama in the party's 2008 presidential primaries is more proof that what used to be an art is turning into a science.

Politicians have always rewarded friends and punished enemies, as the spiteful Bridgegate scandal engulfing New Jersey Governor Chris Christie now reminds us. But evaluating loyalty and disloyalty used to be an entirely subjective exercise that required endless mental acrobatics and was rendered fallible by lapses in memory, blurred emotions and information overload.

The era of Big Data is changing all that. And none too soon for the Clintons, as Hillary keeps her options open for 2016. When you've crossed and been crossed by so many people in 35 years of bare-knuckle politics, it's naturally hard to keep track of all the slights. What better than a computer scorecard that replaces the old mental tally of friends and enemies?

According to a new book by two well-regarded White House correspondents – Politico's Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes of The Hill – Ms. Clinton's aides assigned scores between 1 (most loyal) and 7 (most disloyal) to each Democratic member of Congress and pumped the data into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The result was an instant loyalty ranking that would inform Ms. Clinton and husband Bill's future interactions with fellow Democrats on the list.

Endorsing Mr. Obama for the nomination did not mean you scored an automatic 7 if you had a reasonable excuse, such as being black or from Illinois. Similarly, endorsing Ms. Clinton did not mean you got a 1 if you "didn't go the extra mile" for her or were "just kind of there." The 7 rankings were reserved for those who "endorsed him but really should have been with her … that burned her,"
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Conservatives need any help, really. The party’s Constituent Information Management System (CIMS) is considered the most advanced political database in the country, compiling records on millions of Canadians....In her book Shopping for Votes, the Toronto Star’s Susan Delacourt describes the unsettling transformation of Canadian politics into a game dominated by computer geeks who pump vast amounts of our personal information into party databases to determine whether we’re naughty or nice. The Tories aren’t alone. Justin Trudeau’s Liberals are determined to outdo their rivals in data collection by the 2015 election, and the New Democrats aren’t that far behind.
massive_data_sets  dark_side  political_campaigns  politics  Hillary_Clinton  books  Richard_Nixon  data  data_driven  Konrad_Yakabuski  constituencies 
january 2014 by jerryking
Keep God in the calendar
Apr. 19 2003 | - The Globe and Mail | JOHN IBBITSON.

There could be no more perfect way for a political party to guarantee its defeat at the next election than to take God out of the calendar. The Ontario government won't even end public funding for Catholic schools, though they're an egregious example of religious discrimination. Christians are not a constituency to be messed with.

But there are other reasons, more deeply embedded (will it be possible to rescue that word?) in our collective political psyche for retaining Christian holidays, for beginning daily sessions of federal and provincial parliaments with Christian prayer, for keeping God in the national anthem.

They remind us that Canada is blessed to be a liberal democracy, and that liberal democracy is the product of Christian civilization, and specifically of Protestantism.

Why is that? Why didn't Islam achieve the separation of church and state necessary for democracy to evolve? Why did Buddhist or Hindu or Confucian or Shintoist Asia not generate responsible, constitutional government even once?

The reasons are many, conflicting, and disputed. But Christianity was a part of it. The root religion of Judaism stressed the importance of the individual, who alone could save himself from darkness by embracing God. Judaic tradition, infused by Greek philosophy, imbued Christianity with a tradition of rationalism, skepticism and inquiry. The resistance of northern Europeans to dictatorial Rome brought about Protestantism, with its emphasis on the absolute sovereignty of each individual in his relations with God. If with God, then why not with the state? And the citizen was born.

(And scientific inquiry, and free trade, and the Industrial Revolution. The price was centuries of drab and uncomfortable clothing. Protestants are the worst-dressed people on Earth.)

Democracy, it turns out, is an exportable product. It has taken root in Muslim, Hindu and Buddhist societies, although the further it gets from Protestantism, the more fragile it becomes. Southern Europe came late to democracy, Latin America even later; in Asia and Africa, democracy is still the exception more than the rule.

Which is why even a nation as culturally diverse as Canada does well to remember that our democracy is rooted in the Christian tradition, that our political freedoms and social tolerance flow from that tradition, that it is not an oxymoron to describe Canada as a secular Christian nation.
religion  Christianity  Canada  history  democracy  human_psyche  Protestant_Reformation  John_Ibbitson  constituencies 
december 2013 by jerryking
Harper wanted wireless competition. All he got was grief -
Sep. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski.

Ottawa has had every good reason to seek to inject competition into Canada’s wireless sector. Our trio of telecommunications conglomerates have behaved as any loosely regulated oligopoly would, effectively eliminating consumer choice with identical pricing and straitjacketed product offerings. They have deftly split the Canadian market equally among themselves, ensuring heady profit margins. As far as Rogers, Bell and Telus are concerned, the status quo is heaven....Pity Mr. Harper. He has nothing to show for five years of attempts to spur competition in Canada’s wireless sector except the ire of corporate Canada and thousands of Rogers, Bell and Telus employees. Consumers, a diffuse constituency, were never going to reward the Conservatives for lower cellular prices. (As if they’d let that determine their vote.) But you can bet employees of the Big Three will remember the summer of ’13 when they next go to the ballot box.
Konrad_Yakabuski  wireless  telecommunications  oligopolies  Verizon  constituencies  Corporate_Canada 
september 2013 by jerryking
Canada must refuel for cultural creativity - The Globe and Mail
EDGAR COWAN, JOHN HOBDAY and IAN WILSON

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 04 2012,

culture has since been relegated to “niche” status under successive governments, and the cultural sector as a whole has been relegated to the periphery of policy-making.

Now, as we face the challenges of a highly competitive global digital economy, Canada’s under-capitalized but lively and diverse cultural and creative resources could become important strategic innovation assets....Last October, Innovation Canada: A Call To Action, an influential report prepared under the chairmanship of OpenText’s Tom Jenkins, emphasized the centrality of innovation as “the ultimate source of the long-term competitiveness of businesses and the quality of life of Canadians.”

The mobile digital technology explosion has already transformed many aspects of our daily lives. It has dramatically changed our workplaces. Old business models and habits are being challenged, new forms of expression are emerging and our children, the digital natives, are functioning in new ways.

It has radically altered how we communicate with family and friends, and how we relate to our cultural assets: how we listen to music; how we create and read books; how we distribute and view films; how we find information; even how we experience theatre, opera and ballet.

In order to surf this digital tsunami, we need to understand the broad role of the creative sector in the innovation agenda, and consider how we manage the changes, challenges and opportunities that will be beneficial to us as Canadians....Canada needs a new innovative economic “road map,” firmly linking dynamic creative and cultural sectors with open and welcoming business and technology sectors. This collaboration is essential to our achieving the Canada we want to be. Our innovative arts, culture and heritage sector already generates more than $46-billion for the Canadian economy and employs more than 600,000 people. These figures alone suggest that governments and the business community should recognize the potential of this sector to be mobilized and to play an evolving role in pointing the way to a successful innovation strategy.

Canadians should be made more aware that there is a much broader creative constituency than just those in the traditional visual and performing arts. Creativity is nurtured within many professional sectors: architects, graphic artists, fashion and industrial designers, video game creators, journalists, broadcasters, research scientists of all kinds, health-care professionals, academics, teachers – and many others – particularly among those involved in our dynamic digital technology sector.

One can only begin to imagine the incredible economic benefits for Canada from a “coalition of creators,” encouraging the nimble minds from the vital cultural sector to collaborate with other creative design sectors, and the burgeoning digital technology sector
culture  digital_economy  collaboration  cross-pollination  Canada  creative_renewal  cross-disciplinary  creative_class  creativity  innovation  competitveness  roadmaps  arts  constituencies  cultural_creativity 
september 2012 by jerryking
Lesson in the black-school debate is when the system isn't working - experiment
January 31, 2008 | Globe & Mail | John Barber.

Do we have theories and convictions about education? More than enough! So why not test them? The point is not who's right, but what works. In pursuit of educational and social equity. The price of one experiment’s failure will always be negligible compared to the ongoing cost of trying nothing. One side talks about Martin Luther King Ir. The other side champions the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In practical terms, the school board's narrow vote in favour of a black-focused school tipped when trustee Michael Couteau, who is black, changed his views in response to pressure from constituents.
Afrocentric  experimentation  education  testing  constituencies  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms 
august 2012 by jerryking
Taking One for the Country - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 30, 2012

"I found myself applauding for Chief Justice Roberts the same way I did for Al Gore when he gracefully bowed to the will of the Supreme Court in the 2000 election and the same way I do for those wounded warriors — and for the same reason: They each, in their own way, took one for the country.

To put it another way, Roberts undertook an act of statesmanship for the national good by being willing to anger his own “constituency” on a very big question. But he also did what judges should do: leave the big political questions to the politicians. The equivalent act of statesmanship on the part of our politicians now would be doing what Roberts deferred to them as their responsibility: decide the big, hard questions, with compromises, for the national good. Otherwise, we’re doomed to a tug of war on the deck of the Titanic, no matter what health care plan we have. "...Our newfound natural gas bounty can give us long-term access to cheap, cleaner energy and, combined with advances in robotics and software, is already bringing blue-collar manufacturing back to America. Web-enabled cellphones and tablets are creating vast new possibilities to bring high-quality, low-cost education to every community college and public school so people can afford to acquire the skills to learn 21st-century jobs. Cloud computing is giving anyone with a creative spark cheap, powerful tools to start a company with very little money. And dramatically low interest rates mean we can borrow to build new infrastructure — and make money.
Tom_Friedman  John_Roberts  U.S._Supreme_Court  judges  statesmanship  hydraulic_fracturing  natural_gas  cloud_computing  smartphones  robotics  software  interest_rates  infrastructure  automation  constituencies  low-interest  compromise  blue-collar  manufacturers  politicians  hard_questions  high-quality 
july 2012 by jerryking
The G.O.P.’s ‘Black People’ Platform - NYTimes.com
January 6, 2012 | NYT | Letters to the editor in reaction to an article by CHARLES M. BLOW
Progressive Power
Florida

Todays GOP is in large part the same constituency that made up the Dixiecrats during Jim Crow...and the old Democrat Plantation owners who formed the confederacy and committed treason against the United States -a crime for which they were never held fully accountable nor punished even by confiscation of their ill-earned Manses...the Southern Strategy is , sadly, alive and well...with a nation-wide appeal to frustrated whites seeking a scapegoat .
This vitriol is made all the more dynamic by having an African-American President who serves as a lightning rod for all their pent up hatred....(BTW: Isnt it interesting that they never point out that our president is also half white-Irish , no less!)

Jan. 7, 2012 at 5:09 p.m.
Recommended25

Claire
Chevy Chase MD

This reminds me of the slave owners who while watching their slaves in the fields, would complain about how slow and lazy the slaves were.

If white people had less wealth than any other group in the US, we might wonder how the hell could that be? As white people we have dominated every piece of legislation, directed wealth to our own communities, decided who can or cannot participate in government... had our schools and residences built by black people while denying them use and entrance (except to clean), even though we forced them to pay taxes for public buildings and services, we prohibited their use, we told them they were inferior, ran from communities when they 'integrated' our neighborhoods, encouraged European immigrants to discriminate against black people, only gave them the lowest paying, most dangerous jobs, while closing our country club doors to them.

How in hell could black people not be at the bottom of the socio-economic ladder? We've created a world where those of us with white skin have been given every advantage and privilege. The generational wealth alone of whites will keep black people at the bottom for centuries.

Jan. 7, 2012 at 5:09 p.m.
letters_to_the_editor  Charles_Blow  GOP  African-Americans  slaveholders  white_privilege  generational_wealth  Southern_strategy  constituencies  Dixiecrats  Jim_Crow 
january 2012 by jerryking
All I ever needed to know about change management - - Organization - Change Management
MAY 1997 | McKinsey Quarterly | ROGER DICKHOUT offers 5 basic
premises to help clients design organizational change programs—ideas
Dickout considers as natural laws:
(1) the law of constituent balance--change driven by an imbalance
between a company’s stakeholders: shareholders, employees, customers,
communities, & mgmt.
(2) the law of leverage. Max. the return on effort by changing those
things that will produce the greatest results/really matter.
(3) the law of momentum. Liberate the energy to drive the change. Change
is work. Work requires energy. That energy can be introduced from
outside—e.g. pressure from shareholders or new mgmt.—or the system’s own
potential energy can be transformed into kinetic energy.
(4) the law of feedback and adjustment. Learn how your organization
responds to change, and adjust the program accordingly. N.B.Change may
itself create opportunity.
(5) the law of leadership.Leadership is the scarce resource and
ultimately, the catalyst of change.
McKinsey  change_management  organizational_change  leadership  feedback  leverage  OPMA  momentum  constituencies  adjustments  return_on_effort  imbalances  what_really_matters 
april 2011 by jerryking

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