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jerryking : consumer_research   29

Aldo seizes ‘put up or shut up’ moment for shoes - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 27 2014,

Aldo announced the biggest investment in development that the company has made in its 41-year history. Over the next five years, it will spend $363-million and hire roughly 400 people in an effort to better market itself to customers who have more options than ever.

“We’re being confronted with more competition from so many different angles at this point. It’s basically a ‘put up or shut up’ moment,”....Fundamentally, Mr. Bensadoun sees this as a marketing problem.

Clothing retailers have the luxury of showing you a shoe in its proper context – in other words, as part of an outfit. One of the things Aldo is planning for its store of the future is more screens in-store (e.g. digital signage) that will help to do that, in the absence of any apparel stock.

The store could choose a top 10 looks of the week, Mr. Bensadoun suggests, which could be browsed on the screens (and on a mobile-friendly version of the same service for people on smartphones.) Those looks would specify which shoes to wear with them so that customers could pick footwear based on an overall style they identify with. It would also go the other way: for those who pick up a shoe they like, it will be possible to see how to wear it, and with what....Data are another key part of this transformation project.

Part of Aldo’s multimillion-dollar investment will be devoted to building a better data analytics team as well as hiring research and behaviour experts. This is a priority for all marketers, who face a buying public that has never been more inundated with messages – on television, on their mobile phones, tablets, and computers.

“The consumer insights and analytics department at Aldo was very much in its infancy, up until very recently,”
Aldo  shoes  retailers  e-commerce  marketing  analytics  data  Susan_Krashinsky  SHoeMint  ShoeDazzle  Zappos  customer_insights  consumer_research  contextual  seminal_moments  consumer_behavior  in-store  footwear 
july 2014 by jerryking
The Power of 'Thick' Data - WSJ.com
By
Christian Madsbjerg and
Mikkel B. Rasmussen
March 21, 2014

companies that rely too much on the numbers, graphs and factoids of Big Data risk insulating themselves from the rich, qualitative reality of their customers' everyday lives. They can lose the ability to imagine and intuit how the world—and their own businesses—might be evolving. By outsourcing our thinking to Big Data, our ability to make sense of the world by careful observation begins to wither, just as you miss the feel and texture of a new city by navigating it only with the help of a GPS.

Successful companies and executives work to understand the emotional, even visceral context in which people encounter their product or service, and they are able to adapt when circumstances change. They are able to use what we like to call Thick Data.
thick_data  massive_data_sets  Lego  ethnography  visceral  storytelling  social_data  observations  Samsung  consumer_research  imagination  skepticism  challenges  problems  sense-making  emotions  contextual 
march 2014 by jerryking
Intel’s Sharp-Eyed Social Scientist
FEB. 15, 2014 | NYT |By NATASHA SINGER.

Dr. Bell’s title at Intel, the world’s largest producer of semiconductors, is director of user experience research at Intel Labs, the company’s research arm. She runs a skunk works of some 100 social scientists and designers who travel the globe, observing how people use technology in their homes and in public. The team’s findings help inform the company’s product development process, and are also often shared with the laptop makers, automakers and other companies that embed Intel processors in their goods.
Intel  UX  anthropologists  semiconductors  observations  product_development  ethnography  consumer_research  anthropology  automotive_industry  laptops  social_science 
february 2014 by jerryking
Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
October 11, 2013,| WSJ | By MANUELA MESCO

Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
Consumption Has Dropped 23% in Past Decade

Elsewhere, more and more Italians are turning to delis offering prepared dishes with meat and vegetables. Consumption of frozen fish and meat dishes has soared 70% in the past decade, while ready-made vegetable dishes grew 50%, according to the Italian Institute for Frozen Food. Sales of salad bags have also soared as mixed salads gain at lunch.

Pasta makers are attempting to respond. Barilla, which has about 35% of the Italian pasta market, has sought to beat back the idea that pasta is fattening. It cites pasta's calorie count—365 calories a portion—prominently in its television ads and promotes pasta's low glycemic count. It recently launched an app that helps count calories and is pushing lower-calorie recipes on its website. It is also about to introduce a pasta that is free of gluten, the ingredient often blamed for the bloated feeling associated with pasta.
pasta  Italian  diets  Italy  consumer_research  gluten-free  frozen_foods  prepared_meals  consumption  consumer_behavior 
october 2013 by jerryking
Local Online Advertising: A Primer
Nov 2007 | Franchising World. Vol. 39, Iss. 11; pg. 77, 3 pgs
| by Jeffrey Kolton. ..."Research conducted by Yahoo and comScore,
identified a new class of consumers known as "ROBO" for research
online-buy offline customers. "..."A separate comScore study found that
82 % of local searchers follow up offline via an in-store visit, phone
call, or purchase, emphasizing the importance for marketers to integrate
their on & offline information. 61 % then made purchases. Clearly,
search marketing drives local business....It's easier to talk than type,
and free directory assistance services such as Jingle network's 1-800
FREE 411; Microsoft's 1-800 555 TELL; Google's 1-800 GOOG 411 and
AT&T's 1-800 Yellow Pages are the fastest-growing voice channels
connecting local buyers and sellers...A marketing plan that fails to
address the blended search, video and voice environment is like playing
18 holes of golf with a single club. It's possible to finish, but it
won't be pretty.
ProQuest  local_advertising  City_Voice  small_business  franchising  Yellow_Pages  consumer_research  primers  in-store 
july 2010 by jerryking
Book review: What Women Want - WSJ.com
JULY 6, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MEGHAN COX GURDON. Reviews 'What Women Want' By Paco Underhill
Simon & Schuster, 214 pages, $25 Buying Without Guys. Cleanliness, safety and, please, no salesmen on commission.
book_reviews  gender_gap  consumer_research  women  Paco_Underhill  observations 
july 2010 by jerryking
Shoot The Focus Group
NOVEMBER 14, 2005 | Business Week | by David Kiley
consumer_research  customer_experience  ux  focus_groups 
may 2010 by jerryking
Basics of Conducting Focus Groups
January 11, 2006 | by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC.
consumer_research  ux  howto  customer_experience  focus_groups 
may 2010 by jerryking
Seeking to Build a Better Consumer Profile - WSJ.com
MARCH 15, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by EMILY STEEL.
Exploring Ways to Build a Better Consumer Profile
Nielsen, Digital-Marketing Firm eXelate Form Alliance to Merge Online
and Offline Data in Bid to Improve Ad Targeting. Digital-marketing
companies are rapidly moving to blend information about consumers'
Web-surfing behavior with reams of other personal data available
offline, seeking to make it easier for online advertisers to reach their
target audiences.
Advertisers say the push could enhance their ability to target ads at
specific types of consumers, but it is drawing scrutiny from Congress,
federal regulators and privacy watchdogs, who are already concerned
about the use of Web-surfing data.
Nielsen  consumer_research  privacy  data_driven  personalization  person  EXelate  Acxiom  advertising  marketing  customer_profiling 
march 2010 by jerryking
RETHINKING EVERY RULE OF REINVENTION
May 1, 2006 | Advertising Age | by Scott Bedbury. Great
brands like Nike and Starbucks have transcended the commodity nature of
their categories and become global brand leaders. Essential to both
brands is a nontraditional view toward marketing, particularly in the
area of consumer research, and a cultural commitment to risk taking and
the inevitable mistakes that happen through continuous innovation. For
these brands reinvention is not a one-time event but an ongoing
commitment. Here are four things to keep in mind as you consider ways to
reinvent your brand: 1. Study your competition above all else. 2. Test
your way into it. 3. Think in terms of current distribution. 4. Avoid
mistakes.
consumer_research  branding  risk-taking  incrementalism  innovation  reinvention  Nike  Starbucks  organizational_culture  brands  experimentation  trial_&_error  competition  distribution_channels 
january 2010 by jerryking
The Science Of Desire
JUNE 5, 2006 | BusinessWeek | By Spencer E. Ante, with Cliff
Edwards in San Mateo, Calif. Ethnographers, are a species of
anthropologist who can, among other things, identify what's missing in
people's lives -- the perfect cell phone, home appliance, or piece of
furniture -- and work with designers and engineers to help dream up
products and services to fill those needs.... The beauty of ethnography,
say its proponents, is that it provides a richer understanding of
consumers than does traditional research. Yes, companies are still using
focus groups, surveys, and demographic data to glean insights into the
consumer's mind. But closely observing people where they live and work,
say executives, allows companies to zero in on their customers'
unarticulated desires. Ethnographers' findings often don't lead to a
product or service, only a generalized sense of what people want. Their
research can also take a long time to bear fruit.
ethnography  consumer_research  market_entry  GE  emerging_markets  embryonic  anthropologists  anthropology  observations  unarticulated_desires 
january 2010 by jerryking
Luxury and Responsibility
Feb 05, 2009 | Canadian Business Online Blog | by Paul Klein.
Key factors for success for luxury will include: an in-depth
understanding of what matters to customers (this means moving past
conventional quantitative market research and talking to customers
directly), a strategic, programmatic approach to a relevant and
compelling issue (rather than a tactical cause marketing campaign),
association with an issue that is highly relevant to employees and
customers, a long-term commitment (short-term=low authenticity), and
partnerships with non-profits that can add credibility, and a valid
means of measuring program impact/outcomes. Luxury categories that are
ripe for an appropriate injection of responsibility include those are
particularly conspicuous: jewelry, luxury cars, and designer clothing.
luxury  ksfs  social_responsibility  long-term  consumer_research  cause_marketing  nonprofit 
december 2009 by jerryking
Switch to the low-income customer
14-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant. "When AG
Lafley came in [in 2000] and said, 'We're going to serve the world's
consumers', that led us to say, 'We don't have the product strategy, the
cost structure, to be effective in serving lower income consumers'.
"What's happened in the last five years has been one of the most
dramatic transformations I've seen in my career. We now have all of our
functions focused on that," says Mr Daley. P&G, the world's largest
consumer goods company, devotes about 30 %of its $1.9bn in annual
research and development spending to low-income markets, a 50 % increase
from 5 yrs. ago. Consumer research: spend time in consumers' homes to
gain insights into daily habits; Cost innovation: use proprietary
technology to design low-income products; Innovation productivity: use
"matchmakers" such as InnoCentive; Manufacturing efficiency: cut mfg.
costs by developing a network of suppliers in China, Brazil, Vietnam and
India.
P&G  BRIC  market_research  consumer_research  primary_field_research  customer_insights  innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  A.G._Lafley  InnoCentive  supply_chains  China  Brazil  Vietnam  India  observations  insights  cost-structure  jugaad  proprietary  behavioural  cost-cutting  match-making  CPG  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
WPP, Google to Fund Web-Ad Research - WSJ.com
MARCH 18, 2009| WSJ| by EMILY STEEL

The two companies are teaming with institutions including HBS, Sloan and
Stanford University to fund & research: (1) how ads in traditional
and digital media work together to influence consumer choices; (2)
psychology and neuroscience to analyze how the brain determines whether
Web ads are relevant; and (3), how Chinese Internet users respond to
different online-ad formats, such as display and search ads.
Emily_Steel  Google  digital_media  market_research  cross-cultural  China  online_advertising  neurosciences  WPP  consumer_research  digital_influencers 
march 2009 by jerryking
The New Focus Groups: Online Networks - WSJ.com
Jan. 14, 2008 WSJ article by Emily Steel on how online communities are being cultivated as tools for consumer market research.
market_research  consumer_research  Web_2.0  social_networking  product_development 
january 2009 by jerryking
Capital C: Why can't Canada get it in gear?
Jennifer Wells interview with Tony Chapman of Capital C.

"I look at Canada and I think, why aren't we doing global brands here? We have a multicultural society, we are one of the earliest adopters of new technologies in the world. We have so many things going for us, but no one's come up with a strategy that says, how do we become a superpower in creativity?"
Capital C has proved a creative power in the advertising world. That unbranded "Wig-out" viral video – the one in which a bride goes nuts over hair unhappiness – was revealed to be the work of Capital C for Sunsilk shampoo. The agency counts Frito Lay Canada among its client base, and Dove among its brands.
"We won the global retail strategy for Dove worldwide two weeks ago," Mr. Chapman says. "The retail footprint for Dove around the world will now be coming out of Capital C. That's the kind of work we need to get."
By "we" he doesn't mean his own shop, but the agency world in Canada.
"Could you imagine if we had, for example, the ability to do predictive modelling against every marketplace in the world?" In other words if Canada sold itself as the world's test market, with the capability of measuring the relative impact of a product in marketplaces from Shanghai to Mumbai to London.
"A big part of the future of creativity is understanding the consumer – how they think, feel and behave," he says.
"I want every agency in Canada and every head office in Canada to have access to the technology and tools to invent, create, test, prototype, validate and implement. … If we're the test market for validating brands, head offices around the world are going to send their best people to Canada."
He envisages university alliances and the development of a student population where the learning is more about entrepreneurship and less about the standard marketing precepts of product, place and promotion.
Tony_Chapman  branding  innovators  Jennifer_Wells  design  national_identity  predictive_modeling  thought_leadership  advertising_agencies  Frito_Lay  Bolthouse_Farms  global_champions  brands  multiculturalism  advertising  creativity  test_marketing  innovation  Capital_C  cultural_creativity  Canada  customer_insights  consumer_research  head_offices 
january 2009 by jerryking

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