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jerryking : consumption   8

Culinary Cult Objects: Worth the Price? - WSJ
By JOSH OZERSKY
Updated Aug. 28, 2014

what we're talking about here is consumption of a different order. Buying something fabulously expensive specifically to make it disappear is about as far as you can go in the Ultimates game, and that's precisely why some people will pay the cost. It's not merely the ham, or the bourbon, or the grill the Ultimate-buyer is acquiring. It's the knowledge, testified to by price and praise, that what you have is the best. For them, that knowledge is, if not priceless, something close to it.
luxury  cured_and_smoked  connoisseurship  consumption 
august 2014 by jerryking
Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
October 11, 2013,| WSJ | By MANUELA MESCO

Italy Loses Its Taste for Pasta
Consumption Has Dropped 23% in Past Decade

Elsewhere, more and more Italians are turning to delis offering prepared dishes with meat and vegetables. Consumption of frozen fish and meat dishes has soared 70% in the past decade, while ready-made vegetable dishes grew 50%, according to the Italian Institute for Frozen Food. Sales of salad bags have also soared as mixed salads gain at lunch.

Pasta makers are attempting to respond. Barilla, which has about 35% of the Italian pasta market, has sought to beat back the idea that pasta is fattening. It cites pasta's calorie count—365 calories a portion—prominently in its television ads and promotes pasta's low glycemic count. It recently launched an app that helps count calories and is pushing lower-calorie recipes on its website. It is also about to introduce a pasta that is free of gluten, the ingredient often blamed for the bloated feeling associated with pasta.
pasta  Italian  diets  Italy  consumer_research  gluten-free  frozen_foods  prepared_meals  consumption  consumer_behavior 
october 2013 by jerryking
African Guyanese would require an empowering familial-ethnic environment and an enabling political-economic one to be successful in business
August 21, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Hamley Casep.

Few African Guyanese grow up in an environment in which table conversation is centred around business matters or matters to do with the production and supply of goods and services. Sadly, African Guyanese may be more inclined to discuss the day’s purchases rather than the day’s sales, for the simple reason that African Guyanese economic activity tends more towards consumption rather than production or supply. Generally speaking, African Guyanese do not see themselves as having the means to produce ‒ land, labour or capital ‒ at their disposal, yet see these as prerequisites for venturing into business for themselves. The problem is compounded by the near absence of ethnic role models. In this sense I feel the problem is one of environment as much as education. In fact the two go hand in hand.

Though as Carl Greenidge says, “The education system should be teaching students about the value of business and what is required to be an entrepreneur” and has failed to do so, the system on its own cannot teach people to be risk takers. It is only the immediate environment that can build the level of self-confidence required to make the difference. There is no substitute for growing up in the environment of a family which is not dysfunctional where Uncle Peter is a car dealer, Aunt Sharon owns a supermarket and Cousin Kimberly owns a successful restaurant. These close-to-home realities have a far greater impact on a young person’s realization that they too can become a successful business person.
Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  entrepreneurship  generational_wealth  consumption  role_models  entrepreneur  risk-taking  factors_of_production  family  cultural_values  consumer_mindset  producer_mindset  rituals  dining 
august 2013 by jerryking
Carpe Diem Nation - NYTimes.com
February 11, 2013 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

Europeans who settled America gave their lives a slingshot shape. They pulled back so they could shoot forward. They volunteered to live in harsh conditions today so their descendants could live well for centuries. The pioneers who traveled West did the same thing. So has each generation of immigrants — sacrificing the present for the sake of the future.

This slingshot manner of life led to one of those true national clichés:..This future-oriented mentality had practical effects. For decades, government invested heavily in long-range projects like railroads and canals...Today, Americans have inverted this way of thinking. Instead of sacrificing the present for the sake of the future, Americans now sacrifice the future for the sake of the present...Why have Americans lost their devotion to the future? Part of the answer must be cultural. The Great Depression and World War II forced Americans to live with 16 straight years of scarcity. In the years after the war, people decided they’d had enough. There was what one historian called a “renunciation of renunciation.” We’ve now had a few generations raised with this consumption mind-set. There’s less of a sense that life is a partnership among the dead, the living and the unborn, with obligations to those to come....If the president were to propose an agenda for the future, he’d double spending on the National Institutes of Health. He’d approve the Keystone XL pipeline. He’d cut corporate tax rates while adding a progressive consumption tax. He’d take money from Social Security and build Harlem Children’s Zone-type projects across the nation. He’d means test Medicare and use the money to revive state universities and pay down debt.
David_Brooks  future  Obama  Great_Depression  WWII  instant_gratification  intergenerational_rivalry  delayed_gratification  foresight  far-sightedness  forward_looking  sacrifice  Keystone_XL  long-term  social_trust  consumption  the_Greatest_Generation  Carpe_diem  long-range  railroads  canals 
february 2013 by jerryking
Obama signals new reliance on oil sands
Mar. 30, 2011| The Globe and Mail | SHAWN McCARTHY — GLOBAL ENERGY REPORTER,
energy  consumption  U.S.  infographics  oil_sands  Obama 
april 2011 by jerryking
A high-tech sports revolution
Jan. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Stephen Brunt. The
boomers and their buying power are heading toward the sunset, and the
talk in the sports business now is about how to attract and hold a
different generation, with a different, diminished attention span,
accustomed to having the whole world laid out for them, every minute of
every day, literally at their fingertips.

Getting them out of their homes and into the building or into the
ballpark, getting their eyes to linger for more than a few seconds as a
game flickers across a screen – not to mention the advertising that pays
the freight – has become the core challenge.
sports  consumption  Stephen_Brunt  revolution  arenas  future  challenges  LBMA  sports_marketing  baby_boomers  millennials  attention  advertising  buying_power  stadiums  attention_spans 
january 2010 by jerryking
The Nation of Futurity
November 16, 2009 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS.
"...faith in the future has motivated generations of Americans..". "The
faith is the molten core of the country’s dynamism. There are also
periodic crises of faith. "Today, the rise of China is producing such a
crisis." "The Chinese now have lavish faith in their scientific and
technological potential." "The anxiety in America is caused by the vague
sense that they [China] has what we’re supposed to have.... faith in
the future...." "The U.S. now has an economy shifted too much toward
consumption, debt and imports and too little toward production,
innovation and exports." "It would be nice if some leader could induce
the country to salivate for the future again...connecting discrete
policies — education, technological innovation, funding for basic
research — into a single long-term narrative." "It would mean creating
regional strategies, because innovation happens in geographic clusters,
not at the national level."
David_Brooks  China  future  faith  innovation  regional  America_in_Decline?  consumption  debt  imports  clusters 
november 2009 by jerryking

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