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jerryking : core_businesses   11

Airbnb, Uber, Snap Aim to Show They’re More Than One Hot Product - WSJ
By GREG BENSINGER
Dec. 11, 2016

As IPO talk swirls, tech startups seek to demonstrate to investors they have a vision for long-term growth..... It's questionable whether unicorns can find new revenue opportunities that are complementary to their core business, but [which also] can help them find new customers.”
growth  Airbnb  Uber  Snap  new_businesses  product_extensions  core_businesses  unicorns  vision  long-term 
december 2016 by jerryking
5-Step Primer to Entering New Markets
| Inc.com | BY KARL STARK AND BILL STEWART, Co-founders, Avondale.

Expanding into a new market can be an effective way to leverage your core business for growth. But it takes a disciplined process to accurately assess the potential of each growth opportunity, because a bad bet can bog down your business.

Investing the appropriate level of resources in market analysis, selection, and entry method can create a foundation for success in the chosen market. We suggest following five steps to properly assess the opportunities and risks of a new market.

1. Define the Market
2. Perform Market Analysis
3. Assess Internal Capabilities
4. Prioritize and Select Markets
5. Develop Market Entry Options
marketing  growth  core_businesses  market_entry  new_markets  capabilities  frameworks  market_definition  market_analysis  self-assessment  market_opportunities  market_assessment  generating_strategic_options  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  Michael_McDerment  primers 
october 2016 by jerryking
Inside the mind of a venture capitalist | McKinsey & Company
August 2016 | McK | Steve Jurvetson is a partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Michael Chui,
(1) entrepreneurs who have infectious enthusiasm.
(2) sector of the economy believed to be experiencing rapid growth/ massive disruptive change.
(3) wide range of industries, from synthetic biology to rockets to electric cars to a variety of sectors that weren’t ripe for venture investment in prior decades but now are becoming software businesses.
(4) attributes and people somewhat similar to what I look for in the team at work: enough self-confidence to be humble about what it’s proposing and respect for the team over individuals
How should large companies respond? The large companies that are most exciting to me are the ones that innovate outside their core. big companies need to innovate outside their core businesses. The biggest start-up: Space.
Steve_Jurvetson  McKinsey  DFJ  venture_capital  vc  disruption  space  large_companies  software  core_businesses  Moore's_Law  machine_learning  passions  Elon_Musk  accelerated_lifecycles  space_travel  innovation  self-confidence  high-growth  humility  teams 
august 2016 by jerryking
Augmented business;
Nov 6, 2010. | The Economist.Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 12 |
Anonymous.

The more data that firms collect in their core business, the more they
are able to offer new types of services. 3 trends stand out. First,
since smart systems provide better information, they should lead to
improved pricing and allocation of resources. Second, the integration of
the virtual and the real will speed up the shift from physical goods to
services that has been going on for some time. This also means that
more and more things will be hired instead of bought. Third, economic
value, having migrated from goods to services, will now increasingly
move to data and the algorithms used to analyse them. In fact, data, and
the knowledge extracted from them, may even be on their way to becoming
a factor of production in their own right, just like land, labour and
capital. That will make companies and governments increasingly
protective of their data assets.
sensors  ProQuest  Outsourcing  data_driven  services  augmented_reality  DaaS  factors_of_production  Industrial_Internet  data  algorithms  intangibles  core_businesses  resource_allocation  physical_assets  value_migration 
november 2010 by jerryking
In praise of power seeker
Oct. 19, 2010 | G& M | Harvey Schachter. 7 qualities
build power: ambition, energy, focus, self-knowledge, confidence,
empathy, & capacity to tolerate conflict. Unlisted is intelligence
(overrated).Power must start somewhere,“People err in choosing where to
start accruing their power base.The common mistake is to locate it in
the dept. dealing with an org.’s core activity/skill/product – the unit
that is the most powerful at the moment,” The problem is that’s where
one encounters the most talented competition, well-established career
paths & processes. Further, what’s vital to an org. today might not
be in future. To move up, seek unexploited niches where one can develop
leverage with less resistance & build a power base in activities
that will be important in future. e.g., Robert McNamara & the whiz
kids at Ford built their power base in finance, acctg. & control
functions, rather than eng. allowing McNamara to become the 1st non-Ford
president. Wherever you start – stand out!
ambition  conflict_toleration  core_businesses  empathy  focus  Ford  Harvey_Schachter  influence  leadership  movingonup  Niccolò_Machiavelli  overrated  Pablo_Picasso  personal_energy  power  Robert_McNamara  SecDef  self-confidence  self-knowledge  unexploited_resources  whiz_kids 
october 2010 by jerryking
Building a Platform for Growth
5/22/2006 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Donald L. Laurie,
Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer.
Sometimes building growth in mature industries means more than simple
product extensions or acquisitions. The answer? Develop "growth
platforms" that extend your business into new domains. An excerpt from
Harvard Business Review.
HBR  business_development  core_businesses  embryonic  growth  platforms  start_ups  spinups  product_strategy  product_extensions  growth_platforms  new_businesses  mature_industries 
february 2010 by jerryking
Leaders of the Pack - WSJ.com
MARCH 3, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RICHARD A. D'AVENI.
It's harder than ever for a company to dominate its market these days --
or to defend a dominant position. That makes it all the more important
to have a strategy to try. This article is about defending one's
"strongholds". the Five S's of stronghold strategies: securing a
defensible stronghold; separating strongholds into nonoverlapping parts
of the market; surrounding rival strongholds to contain them; storming a
stronghold by direct or rapid assault; and shape-shifting strongholds
by radically redefining the boundaries among strongholds in a market.In
the end, to protect and leverage the power of strongholds, the use of
the Five S's must be governed by four principles:

* Anticipate Ripple Effects: * Strengthen your stronghold to hold
back the ripples: * Avoid the pressure of overpowering ripples:
* Build a sphere of influence to create your own ripples:
growth  core_businesses  ripple_effects  strategies 
february 2010 by jerryking
Googling Growth - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by CHRIS ZOOK. Rapid
shifts in markets and technologies are forcing companies of all sorts to
change direction faster than ever. Many management teams are tempted
by "big bang" solutions: dramatic, transformative mergers or aggressive
leaps into sexy new markets. The success rate for major, life-changing
mergers is only about one in 10. For most companies, reinvention of a
core business doesn't have to involve such high levels of risk. The
solution lies in mining hidden assets -- assets already possessed but
not being tapped for maximum growth potential.
One way to open management's eyes to hidden assets is to identify the
richest hunting grounds, usually camouflaged as hidden business
platforms, untapped customer insights, and underused capabilities.
accelerated_lifecycles  Apple  assets  Bain  big_bang  business_models  Chris_Zook  core_businesses  customer_insights  GE  growth  hidden  high-risk  iPODs  latent  life-changing  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  moonshots  Nestlé  Novozymes  rapid_change  reinvention  resource_management  Samsung  success_rates  transformational  underutilization 
february 2010 by jerryking
Seeking New Core Business? It Often Hides in Plain Sight
March 28, 2007 | HBR reprinted in the Wall Street Journal | by
Chis Zook. What happens when the core business goes rotten or offers no
more opportunities for growth? Some try to dig in and defend the
status quo, others buy a company in a hot new sector, while still others
transform themselves through a big merger. These tactics rarely work,
says Chris Zook, who leads Bain & Co.'s global-strategy practice.
Instead, according to the results of a study he led, the greatest
successes at corporate redefinition came from finding an alternative
core business that lay dormant somewhere in the company. In nearly all
25 cases studied, the successful shifts were guided by examining
existing customers' needs.
HBR  Chris_Zook  Bain  growth  core_businesses 
february 2010 by jerryking
Shielding Intellectual Property - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by BHARAT ANAND and
ALEXANDER GALETOVIC. Below we set out a selection of strategies that
have allowed companies highly dependent on their intellectual property
to live to fight another day.
(1) Nip it in the Bud. Some companies combat infringement by acting
before competitors can catch their breath. Intel famously pre-empts
misappropriation of its core assets by dominating the market long enough
to realize huge profits before reverse engineering, imitation, or
piracy can eat into them.(2) Overwhelm competitors by fashioning
internal operations into an engine of innovation.(3) Make a Bundle. If
one danger of piracy is to drive down a company's prices, why are smart
companies charging nothing for some of their products? (4)Move the
Goalposts. When the threat to their core assets is overwhelming,
companies must take more extreme action -- sometimes expanding into
related businesses.
bundling  competitive_strategy  copycats  core_businesses  counterfeits  defensive_tactics  Intel  intellectual_property  internal_systems  innovation  patents  patent_infringement  piracy  pre-emption  property_rights  reverse_engineering  threats 
december 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Corporate survival: Be ready to chart a new course when industry winds blow
Oct. 1, 2007 G&M column by Harvey Schachter on Anita
McGahan's suggestions on how to interpret the signals of industry
change.

Determine whether your core activities or core assets are threatened - or both. Core activities are those actions that have historically generated profits for the industry, such as owning dealerships in the auto industry, which is less significant in an Internet era. Core assets are the resources, knowledge, and brand capital that have made the organization unique, like blockbuster drugs in the pharmaceutical industry.

(1) Radical Change.our core activities and core assets are both threatened with obsolescence. This is similar to the concept of disruptive change outlined by Harvard's Clayton Christensen in his writings.

(2) Intermediating Change. Core activities are threatened while core assets retain their strength. Sotheby's, for example, remains top notch at assessing works of art but because of technology eBay can challenge on the matchmaking side of the business.

(3) Creative Change. Core assets are under threat but core activities remain stable, as in pharmaceuticals or oil and gas exploration, where relationships with customers and suppliers are fairly steady but assets turn over constantly. Innovation occurs in fits and starts.

(4) Progressive Change. Both core assets and core activities are stable, but significant change still threatens, as in discount retailing, long-haul trucking, and commercial airlines.
assets  Clayton_Christensen  Harvey_Schachter  strategy  industries  structural_change  preparation  readiness  warning_signs  howto  interpretation  core_businesses  obsolescence  taxonomy  change  pivots 
january 2009 by jerryking

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