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jerryking : core_competencies   13

Luxury Brands Buy Supply Chains to Ensure Meeting Demand
Nov. 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By Mark Ellwood.

The luxury markets are booming to such an extent that brands look to ensure they can meet demand by buying companies that supply their raw materials.

In the last six years, David Duncan has been on a buying spree. This Napa Valley-based winemaker and owner of Silver Oak Cellars hasn’t been splurging on fast cars or vacation homes, though. He’s been buying up vines — close to 500 acres in Northern California and Oregon.

It’s been a tough process, at times: He almost lost one site to a wealthy Chinese bidder. It was only when he raised his offer by $1 million that he clinched the sale at the last moment. At the same time, Mr. Duncan also took full control of A&K Cooperage, now the Oak Cooperage, the barrel maker in Higbee, Mo., in which his family had long held a stake. These hefty acquisitions are central to his 50-year plan to future-proof the family business against a changing luxury marketplace.

As Mr. Duncan realized, this market faces what might seem an enviable problem: a surfeit of demand for its limited supply. The challenge the winery will face over the next decade is not marketing, or finding customers, but finding enough high-quality raw materials to sate the looming boom in demand. Though there might be economic uncertainty among the middle classes, wealthier consumers are feeling confident and richer because of changes like looser business regulations and lower taxes.
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  brands  competitive_advantage  core_competencies  future-proofing  high_net_worth  high-quality  luxury  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  sustainability  vertical_integration  vineyards 
november 2018 by jerryking
The Sensor-Rich, Data-Scooping Future - NYTimes.com
APRIL 26, 2015 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Sensor-rich lights, to be found eventually in offices and homes, are for a company that will sell knowledge of behavior as much as physical objects....The Internet will be almost fused with the physical world. The way Google now looks at online clicks to figure out what ad to next put in front of you will become the way companies gain once-hidden insights into the patterns of nature and society.

G.E., Google and others expect that knowing and manipulating these patterns is the heart of a new era of global efficiency, centered on machines that learn and predict what is likely to happen next.

“The core thing Google is doing is machine learning,” Eric Schmidt....The great data science companies of our sensor-packed world will have experts in arcane reaches of statistics, computer science, networking, visualization and database systems, among other fields. Graduates in those areas are already in high demand.

Nor is data analysis just a question of computing skills; data access is also critically important. As a general rule, the larger and richer a data set a company has, the better its predictions become. ....an emerging area of computer analysis known as “deep learning” will blow away older fields.

While both Facebook and Google have snapped up deep-learning specialists, Mr. Howard said, “they have far too much invested in traditional computing paradigms. They are the equivalent of Kodak in photography.” Echoing Mr. Chui’s point about specialization, he said he thought the new methods demanded understanding of specific fields to work well.

It is of course possible that both things are true: Big companies like Google and Amazon will have lots of commodity data analysis, and specialists will find niches. That means for most of us, the answer to the future will be in knowing how to ask the right kinds of questions.
sensors  GE  GE_Capital  Quentin_Hardy  data  data_driven  data_scientists  massive_data_sets  machine_learning  automated_reasoning  predictions  predictive_analytics  predictive_modeling  layer_mastery  core_competencies  Enlitic  deep_learning  niches  patterns  analog  insights  latent  hidden  questions  Google  Amazon  aftermath  physical_world  specialization  consumer_behavior  cyberphysical  arcane_knowledge  artificial_intelligence  test_beds 
april 2015 by jerryking
Patterns of Deconstruction: Layer Mastery
JANUARY 01, 1999 | bcg.perspectives |by David Edelman.

In order to exist as a layer, a product or activity supplied by a single company must be a key input to one or many value chains, while also being modular enough to stand on its own as an independent business.
So, the first step in achieving layer mastery is to identify whether any assets or capabilities that have traditionally been part of your proprietary product definition or process expertise may represent the kernel of a new layer business. Often, the asset or capability you have been protecting most carefully is precisely the thing you should be selling to as many players as possible—competitors included—in an effort to create a branded industry standard.

Is the Layer Worth Mastering?

Not all are. Deconstruction de-averages the economics of a business. Some layers are naturally fragmented, leading to stalemate. Other layers, however, can be highly scale sensitive, leading to winner-takes-all competitive dynamics.
For instance, as deconstruction separates physical activities from informational ones, a new information-based scale is emerging. In layers governed by this information scale, network effects create ever increasing value for customers as more of them use the layer—a powerful economic logic for the existence of a dominant competitor.
BCG  layer_mastery  deconstruction  core_competencies  winner-take-all  physical_activities  value_chains  scaling  assets  capabilities  network_effects  kernels  informational_activities 
april 2015 by jerryking
Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for Washington Post - WSJ.com
August 6, 2013 | WSJ | By KEACH HAGEY and GREG BENSINGER

Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for the Post
Amazon Founder Brings Skills in Data Gathering, Software, E-Commerce


Mr. Bezos bought the paper in a personal capacity, many media-industry experts expressed optimism that the Amazon.com Inc. AMZN -1.23% founder will be able to apply to the Post the same software development, data gathering and e-commerce chops—as well as his patient investment philosophy—that turned his company into a powerhouse.

"Building audience, personalizing the offering, and, certainly, monetization," those are the core competencies that Jeff Bezos and Amazon have developed,
newspapers  turnarounds  software  e-commerce  data  Jeff_Bezos  WaPo  strategic_patience  core_competencies 
august 2013 by jerryking
Steve Kroft: Growing a firm to help feed the world - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Gordon Pitts.

Steve Kroft runs the kind of company that is on Canada’s endangered species list. Winnipeg-based Conviron is a mid-sized manufacturer with a high-value-added product that is the world leader in its niche. The product line consists of environmentally controlled chambers used for plant research, and exports account for 90 per cent of sales. The family company – whose official name is Controlled Environments Ltd. – has been export-driven since it was established 49 years ago. As Steve Kroft explains it, the high Canadian dollar has only made it stronger....And where are the opportunities?

Our core competence is designing controlled environments. We happened to focus on agriculture and plant growth, but controlled environments are needed in other industries. People come to us to test protective clothing for first responders, or for applications in pharmaceuticals and chemical storage, and we do a very good job. We haven’t marketed yet in those kinds of areas, but they are where we can make a contribution.
Canada  Canadian  core_competencies  Gordon_Pitts  greenhouses  manufacturers  mid-sized  exporting  family-owned_businesses  value_added  niches  Winnipeg  farming  agriculture  family_business  value  endangered 
march 2013 by jerryking
Five savvy questions for strategic success
Feb. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail |HARVEY SCHACHTER
Playing to Win
By A.G. Lafley and Roger Martin

(Harvard Business School Press, 260 pages, $30)
The strategy worked, by satisfying the five questions:

* Winning aspirations. Most companies have lofty mission statements but the authors say that isn’t the same thing as having a strategy. It’s a starting point, statements of an ideal future.
* Where to play. In which markets and with which customers is it best to compete? This is a vital question, because you can’t be all things to all people if you want to be successful.

* How to win.After selecting the playing field, you must choose the best approach, which the authors stress might be very different from your competitors.
* Core capabilities. What capabilities must be in place for your organization to win?
* Management systems. What needs to be in place in your management approach to support the strategy, and measure how successful you are with it
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  questions  book_reviews  P&G  A.G._Lafley  strategy  mission_statements  ambitions  internal_systems  core_competencies  Instrumentation_monitoring  measurements  books  capabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
What Knowledge Is of Most Worth in the Global and Digital Economy?
Catching Up or Leading the Way

by Yong Zhao

We must cultivate skills and knowledge that are not available at a
cheaper price in other countries or that cannot be rendered useless by
machines. This is mainly Pink's argument but is shared by others such as
the New Commission on Skills of the American Workforce and Harvard
economists Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz, both professors of
economics at Harvard University. In The Race Between Education and
Technology, they write:

Today, skills, no matter how complex, that can be exported through
outsourcing or offshoring are vulnerable. Even some highly skilled jobs
that can be outsourced, such as reading radiographs, may be in danger of
having stable or declining demand. Skills for which a computer program
can substitute are also in danger. But skills for non-routine
employments and jobs with in-person skills are less susceptible. (Goldin
& Katz, 2008, p. 352)
digital_economy  Daniel_Pink  China  education  eBay  21st._century  skills_training  skills  Outsourcing  automation  non-routine  imagination  in-person  special_sauce  Lawrence_Katz  knowledge  Managing_Your_Career  core_competencies  personal_growth  self-analysis  self-worth  face2face 
june 2011 by jerryking
Is Netflix Becoming a Television Station? - Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic
Mar 16 2011 Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic
Netflix  core_competencies 
march 2011 by jerryking
Prahalad lives | The Economist | Human Potential | September 15-16, 2010 | New York
Submitted by economist on Tue, 08/24/2010 - 22:22.
Schumpeter's notebook remembers the late C.K. Prahalad, a thought
leader in management and inventor of "core competencies". Prahalad
believed in the centrality of the individual as the backbone of business
strategy. What do you think is a company's biggest resource today?
C.K._Prahalad  thought_leadership  core_competencies  strategy 
august 2010 by jerryking
The Life’s Work of a Thought Leader
August 9, 2010 | Strategy + Business | by Art Kleiner.
Thought Leaders: In interviews conducted before his untimely death,
C.K. Prahalad — the sage of core competencies and the bottom of the
pyramid — looked back on his career and talked about the way ideas
evolve.
C.K._Prahalad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  interviews  core_competencies 
august 2010 by jerryking

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