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jerryking : corruption   64

New Ontario initiative targets complex, white-collar crimes
AUGUST 20, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | GREG MCARTHUR.

The Ontario government has quietly launched an initiative intended to solve a problem that has vexed Canadian law enforcement: the successful prosecution of complex, white-collar crimes.

With little fanfare, the province has created what it is calling the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), with a structure that is novel to Canada: teaming up investigators and prosecutors and dedicating them to financial crimes that are too sprawling for any one municipal police force to handle.....Ontario’s office, however, will investigate an array of financial crimes, not just money laundering but large-scale fraud and corruption. It was created to fix long-standing issues with how the government combats such crimes, the two officials in charge of the initiative said in an interview......One of the primary goals is to bridge gaps between investigators and prosecutors......to prevent cases from languishing and forcing judges to throw them out because of unconstitutional court delays. Unlike a traditional police investigation, the SFO’s structure means prosecutors will be heavily involved from the outset of a case........The SFO is also designed to thwart an issue common to most police departments: the frequent shifting of resources away from fraud units whenever police are confronted with a more pressing public-safety issue, such as a threat of terrorism......“White-collar crime investigations are both complex and lengthy. Specialization and long-term experience of both prosecutors and the investigators will be critical to success.”
corruption  financial_crimes  financial_penalties  fraud  fraud_detection  groundbreaking  large-scale  law_enforcement  legal_strategies  money_laundering  Ontario  prosecutors  Queens_Park  securities_enforcement  securities_industry  white-collar  white-collar_crime 
august 2019 by jerryking
Why further financial crises are inevitable
March 19, 2019 | Financial Times | Martin Wolf.

We learnt this month that the US Fed had decided not to raise the countercyclical capital buffer required of banks above its current level of zero, even though the US economy is at a cyclical peak. It also removed “qualitative” grades from its stress tests for American banks, though not for foreign ones. Finally, the Financial Stability Oversight Council, led by Steven Mnuchin, US Treasury secretary, removed the last insurer from its list of “too big to fail” institutions.

These decisions may not endanger the stability of the financial system. But they show that financial regulation is procyclical: it is loosened when it should be tightened and tightened when it should be loosened. We do, in fact, learn from history — and then we forget.....Regulation of banks has tightened since the financial crises of 2007-12. Capital and liquidity requirements are stricter, the “stress test” regime is quite demanding, and efforts have been made to end “too big to fail” by developing the idea of orderly “resolution” of large and complex financial institutions.....Yet complacency is unjustified. Banks remain highly leveraged institutions.....history demonstrates the procyclicality of regulation. Again and again, regulation is relaxed during a boom: indeed, the deregulation often fuels that boom. Then, when the damage has been done and disillusionment sets in, it is tightened again........We can see four reasons why this tends to happen: economic, ideological, political and merely human.

* Economic
Over time the financial system evolves. There is a tendency for risk to migrate out of the best regulated parts of the system to less well regulated parts. Even if regulators have the power and will to keep up, the financial innovation that so often accompanies this makes it hard to do so. The global financial system is complex and adaptable. It is also run by highly motivated people. It is hard for regulators to catch up with the evolution of what we now call “shadow banking”.

* Ideological
the tendency to view this complex system through a simplistic lens. The more powerful the ideology of free markets, the more the authority and power of regulators will tend to erode. Naturally, public confidence in this ideology tends to be strong in booms and weak in busts.

* Political

the financial system controls vast resources and can exert huge influence. In the 2018 US electoral cycle, finance, insurance and real estate (three intertwined sectors) were the largest contributors, covering one-seventh of the total cost. This is a superb example of Mancur Olson’s Logic of Collective Action: concentrated interests override the general one. This is much less true in times of crisis, when the public is enraged and wants to punish bankers. But it is true, again, in normal times.

Borderline or even blatant corruption also emerges: politicians may even demand a share in the wealth created in booms. Since politicians ultimately control regulators, the consequences for the latter, even if they are honest and diligent, are evident.

A significant aspect of the politics is closely linked to regulatory arbitrage: international competition. One jurisdiction tries to attract financial business via “light-touch” regulation; others then follow. This is frequently because their own financiers and financial centres complain bitterly. It is hard to resist the argument that foreigners are cheating.

* Human
There is a human tendency to dismiss long-ago events as irrelevant, to believe This Time is Different and ignore what is not under one’s nose. Much of this can be summarised as “disaster myopia”. The public gives irresponsible policymakers the benefit of the doubt and enjoys the boom. Over time, regulation degrades, as the forces against it strengthen and those in its favour corrode.

The cumulative effect of these efforts is quite clear: regulations erode and that erosion will be exported. This has happened before and will do so again. This time, too, is not different.
boom-to-bust  bubbles  collective_action  complacency  corruption  disaster_myopia  entrenched_interests  economic_downturn  financiers  financial_crises  financial_innovation  financial_regulation  financial_system  historical_amnesia  Mancur_Olson  Martin_Wolf  policymakers  politicians  politics  procyclicality  regulatory_arbitrage  regulation  regulators  stress-tests  This_Time_is_Different  U.S._Federal_Reserve 
march 2019 by jerryking
US and China must find ways to control their elites | Financial Times
July 1, 2018 | FT| Rana Foroohar. Pinboard saved article/artifact #25,000

Success rests on heading off popular unrest, rather than winning trade fights.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Tension between the US and China is driving much of what is happening in the markets today. The analysis has focused on tariffs, currency manipulation, strategic technologies and which country has the most to win or lose in a trade war.

But there is a more important question to be asked when thinking about the future success and stability of each nation: which country will be better able to control its moneyed elites?

In his 1982 work The Rise and Decline of Nations, the economist Mancur Olson argues that civilisations tend to decline when the moneyed interests take over politics. That has clearly happened in both countries, where the levels of wealth inequality are not dissimilar; the top 1 per cent in China own about 30 per cent of the economy; in the US, the figure is 42 per cent.

........Chinese leaders also believe that America’s inability to curb its own elites will be the country’s downfall [Achilles’ heel]....America’s elite business class has, for decades now, sought to distract from rising oligopoly with hypocrisy. US companies complain vociferously about unfair Chinese trade practices and intellectual property theft.
U.S.  China  elitism  Rana_Foroohar  societal_collapse  the_One_Percent  self-interest  books  economists  Mancur_Olson  entrenched_interests  Achilles’_heel  Xi_Jinping  corruption  Chinese_Communist_Party  conflicts  confrontations  U.S.-China_relations 
july 2018 by jerryking
As China moves away from communist regime, cracks appear - The Globe and Mail
NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE
BEIJING — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Mar. 19 2015

China’s current leader, President Xi Jinping, who is winding back years of liberalization by cracking down hard on dissent and ordering a wholesale reindoctrination of party officials. At the same time, new cracks are appearing in China’s economic foundation, a coincidence that is rekindling a long-standing debate about the viability of the Communist regime. David Shambaugh, a prominent China expert at George Washington University who had been seen as friendly to Beijing, fuelled the debate with a recent essay arguing that Mr. Xi’s “despotism is severely stressing China’s system and society – and bringing it closer to a breaking point.”

He cited the eagerness of wealthy Chinese to leave the country and the risks to Mr. Xi from an anti-corruption campaign that threatens powerful entrenched interests, and also argued that economic reforms will be stillborn without accompanying political change.
China  Xi_Jinping  corruption  Mao_Zedong  Chinese_Communist_Party  endgame  entrenched_interests 
march 2015 by jerryking
Marion Barry, Former Mayor of Washington, Dies at 78 - NYTimes.com
NOV. 23, 2014| NYT | By DAVID STOUT.

Mr. Barry, 78, was a flamboyant and polarizing mayor of the nation’s capital who went to prison on cocaine charges, then recaptured City Hall in one of the most improbable comebacks in the history of American urban politics.
mayoral  obituaries  Washington_D.C.  scandals  African-Americans  corruption  Improbables 
november 2014 by jerryking
Massive corruption has a long history in China - The Globe and Mail
NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE
BEIJING — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 01 2014
corruption  China 
august 2014 by jerryking
The real reason world soccer is cleaning up its act - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MILNER
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The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014
soccer  corruption  advertising  brands  FIFA 
june 2014 by jerryking
There needs to be a sober examination of our state of affairs Georgetown, Guyana
December 6, 2013 | Stabroek News | Frank Fyffe.

Said Fenty: “I now lament the stark fact that politics, governance, discrimination, corruption, management of resources and lack of employment among other factors, have caused young Guyanese to yearn to leave this homeland still rich with resources. Do you realise what national hopelessness means amongst the larger portion of our population?” But who can honestly look you in the eye and deny that? And I’m not denying the hard, perilous and precarious times many are faced with abroad, but the very fact that they crave madly the opportunity to leave paints a picture and tells a different story ‒ too many things are amiss and adrift.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  failed_states  misgovernance  hopelessness  brain_drain  emigration  politics  governance  discrimination  corruption  mismanagement  unemployment  precarious 
december 2013 by jerryking
Canada’s African adventure takes a colonial turn - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by DOUG SAUNDERS.

Even though Ottawa had shifted its foreign-aid focus away from Africa a few years ago, the government has come back in force, with a new large-scale aid strategy in which its agencies work with resource companies, alongside charities and private aid groups, in a way that, in the words of International Co-operation Minister Julian Fantino, “addresses social and environmental issues of extractive sector development” and helps countries “use resource rents and investment to spur economic diversification in local communities, often focused on agricultural and agribusiness development.” It makes some sense: Canada ought to be providing this sort of aid to the people it’s contacting – sometimes beneficially, sometimes otherwise – with its resource-taking activities.

But the end effect is that Canada has landed in Africa in a big way: tearing up the land, building new towns, creating roads and pipelines and airports, and bringing in new forms of government and administration to create new economies and enforce human rights and democratic standards.

This bears a strong resemblance to what the military calls counterinsurgency: To make the local population tolerate your forceful acts and embrace your cause, you win over their hearts and minds by building roads, schools, water supplies and better farms. In the process, though, you become something like a colonial government.

Canada, not yet fully free from its own years as a colony, is far from comfortable with this role. We ought to find some other name, and some other shape, for our African project.
Africa  counterinsurgency  CSR  economic_development  economic_diversification  natural_resources  mining  Canada  Doug_Saunders  foreign_aid  corruption  oil_industry  engineering  colonialism  large-scale  resource_extraction 
february 2013 by jerryking
Brookfield Faces Bribery Charges in Brazil - WSJ.com
February 5, 2013 | WSJ | By CRAIG KARMIN and PAULO TREVISANI.
Brookfield  corruption  Brazil 
february 2013 by jerryking
Underpricing risky business
February 1, 2013 | G&M report on Business pg B2 |by David Parkinson.

As energy and mining reserves have become increasingly expensive to find in other, more stable parts of the world, Africa's dangers have been glossed over in the quest to cash in on the continent’s still relatively undeveloped resources. Companies have been ignoring the risky reality, and investors have been underpricing it...Africa's significant growth potential has generated optimism, however, the geopolitical risks facing investors in Africa remain, for the most part, underestimated.”
The biggest threat to business in Africa, he argues, is “re1igious/ ideological militancy"--especially from Islamist/jihadist groups - which he says “has been vastly underestimated, and will pose significant risks to foreign investors in much of Africa."
He believes companies and their investors are underpricing the risks of doing business in Aŕrica, including rising security and insurance costs and cant project delays that could come from security threats, military conflicts or regime changes....Until the market starts pricing risk into African resource investments before a crisis forces the realization upon it, there will be little incentive for companies to seek less risky and less corrupt places to put their money.
And there will be more harsh and costly awakenìngs for investors who are themselves willfully blind to the risks.
underpricing  risks  Africa  natural_resources  political_risk  geopolitics  Mali  war  underestimation  frontier_markets  corruption  mining  mispricing  Islamists  jihadis  willful_blindness 
february 2013 by jerryking
How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico - NYTimes.com
December 17, 2012 | NYT |By DAVID BARSTOW and ALEJANDRA XANIC von BERTRAB.

The NYT’s examination reveals that Wal-Mart de Mexico was not the reluctant victim of a corrupt culture that insisted on bribes as the cost of doing business. Nor did it pay bribes merely to speed up routine approvals. Rather, Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited. It used bribes to subvert democratic governance — public votes, open debates, transparent procedures. It used bribes to circumvent regulatory safeguards that protect Mexican citizens from unsafe construction. It used bribes to outflank rivals.

Through confidential Wal-Mart documents, The Times identified 19 store sites across Mexico that were the target of Wal-Mart de Mexico’s bribes. The Times then matched information about specific bribes against permit records for each site. Clear patterns emerged. Over and over, for example, the dates of bribe payments coincided with dates when critical permits were issued. Again and again, the strictly forbidden became miraculously attainable.... Wal-Mart declined to discuss its conduct in Teotihuacán while it is continuing its own investigation. The company has hired hundreds of lawyers, investigators and forensic accountants who are examining all 27 of its foreign markets. It has already found potentially serious wrongdoing, including indications of bribery in China, Brazil and India. Several top executives in Mexico and India have been suspended or forced to resign in recent months.

Wal-Mart has also tightened oversight of its internal investigations. It has created high-level positions to help root out corruption. It is spending millions on anticorruption training and background checks of the lawyers and lobbyists who represent Wal-Mart before foreign governments. The company has spent more than $100 million on investigative costs this year.
Wal-Mart  Mexico  corruption  forensics  bribery 
december 2012 by jerryking
TDSB workers used public funds for personal business, manager says - The Globe and Mail
KATE HAMMER - EDUCATION REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Dec. 20 2012
TDSB  corruption  unions  skilled_trades 
december 2012 by jerryking
Africa next: The quest for Africa’s riches - The Globe and Mail
GEOFFREY YORK

LUBUMBASHI, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO — The Globe and Mail

Last updated Sunday, Sep. 30 2012
Geoffrey_York  Africa  Congo  globalization  emerging_markets  mining  South-South  BRIC  corruption  Renaissance_Capital 
october 2012 by jerryking
Hard Lines, Red Lines and Green Lines - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: September 22, 2012

Aung San Suu Kyi’s famous dictum that “it is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it, and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it.”
... It is deeply true and relevant today, when so few leaders now dare to throw caution and polls to the wind and tell people the truth about anything hard or controversial.
Tom_Friedman  leadership  Obama  Aung_San_Suu_Kyi  leaders  corruption  political_power  red_lines 
september 2012 by jerryking
Liberate Africa From Its Political Elites - WSJ.com
July 5, 2005 | WSJ | By MOELETSI MBEKI.

African political elites have systematically exploited their positions in order to line their own pockets. They have given favors and won influence through the funding of huge loss-making industrialization projects. They have exploited the natural resources of their countries and then transferred profits, taxes, and aid funds into their own foreign bank accounts at the same time that they ran up enormous debts to finance their governments' operations.

What were the results of those predatory policies? According to the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, which have become Africa's fairy godparents, Africans are poor and getting poorer.
Africa  political_elites  crony_capitalism  misrule  misgovernance  mismanagement  corruption  poor_governance  IMF  World_Bank  poverty 
august 2012 by jerryking
Africa's Poverty Trap - WSJ.com
March 23, 2007 | WSJ |By WILLIAM R. EASTERLY.

Economists involved in Africa then and now undervalued free markets, instead coming up with one of the worst ideas ever: state direction by the states least able to direct.

African governments are not the only ones that are bad, but they have ranked low for decades on most international comparisons of corruption, state failure, red tape, lawlessness and dictatorship. Nor is recognizing such bad government "racist" -- this would be an insult to the many Africans who risk their lives to protest their own bad governments. Instead, corrupt and mismanaged governments on the continent reflect the unhappy way in which colonizers artificially created most nations, often combining antagonistic ethnicities. Anyway, the results of statist economics by bad states was a near-zero rise in GDP per capita for Ghana, and the same for the average African nation, over the last 50 years....The cowed IMF and the World Bank never mention the words "free market" in thousands of pages devoted to ending poverty. Even the World Bank's 2005 World Development Report "A Better Investment Climate for Everyone" doesn't mention the forbidden words.World Bank economists are so scared of offending anyone on Africa that they recite tautologies.
William_Easterly  Africa  economists  IMF  World_Bank  foreign_aid  free_markets  failed_states  lawlessness  corruption  poverty  mismanagement  misrule  governance  poor_governance  misgovernance 
august 2012 by jerryking
Pay the ticket, not the towel - Stabroek News - Guyana
By Stabroek staff | 0 Comments | Daily, Features | Tuesday, July 31,
corruption  Guyana 
august 2012 by jerryking
Even the Prostitutes Have Degrees - WSJ.com
January 31, 2003 | WSJ | Daniel Henninger.

Accountability and responsibility may well be the two words Mr. Bush hopes most to deposit in our political vocabulary....Africa is the one big place in the world no one in politics wants to think about. Africa is "hopeless." Our leaders in Washington, however, can't escape Africa's realities entirely because they spend each day in the back seat of taxis driven by black men who have fled from Africa's non-functioning economies. It is always disconcerting when one talks with these African taxi drivers to find they are often better educated than American blacks in similar jobs. They are in America not because Africa is stupid but because Africa's politicians are often corrupt and have stupid ideas that ruin the people beneath them.
Daniel_Henninger  HIV  Africa  Kenya  Non-Integrating_Gap  hopelessness  failed_states  politicians  misgovernance  misrule  corruption  poor_governance 
june 2012 by jerryking
Telecom scandal shakes India’s most beloved industry - The Globe and Mail
iain marlow
NEW DELHI— From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011
corruption  scandals  India  telecommunications  wireless 
november 2011 by jerryking
China's vanishing factory bosses - The Globe and Mail
MARK MACKINNON
WENZHOU, CHINA— From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Nov. 05, 2011
China  Mark_MacKinnon  mismanagement  corruption 
november 2011 by jerryking
Some investors finding China full of fool's gold
24 June 2005 |The Globe & Mail pg 10 | Geoffrey York.

"Despite all the evidence that only the tiniest minority strikes it rich in the Chinese domestic market, there is never any shortage of corporate gamblers," Joe Studwell (editor-in-chief of the China Economic Quarterly) writes in his book The China Dream , which tackles the age-old myth that China's vast population is a paradise for investors.

"For 700 years, ever since outsiders first started writing about the place, the Western world has believed that there are untold riches to be garnered in China," he says. "No nation in history has ever been promoted as a surer bet for investment returns. Yet history also teaches that time and again China has failed to fulfill the promise that foreigners ascribe to her."

John Gruetzner, a Canadian business consultant in Beijing, believes that investors can still make money in China, but they need intelligent research and planning.

"A portion of Canadian investors think you can fly in and pick some cherries and leave," he says. "That might have been okay in the 1980s and early 1990s, but now you need a high level of representation, just as you would in Buffalo or Ottawa or Paris."

The China dream is an alluring one. China today is attracting more foreign investment than any other country in the world. A record $61-billion was invested in China by foreign firms last year, and a staggering total of $570-billion has been invested since 1980. Of the world's top 500 multinational corporations, more than 400 have invested in China. Everyone seems to believe you have to be in China.

Yet the actual level of profits in China is surprisingly small. A survey last year by the China Economic Quarterly found that the affiliates of U.S. companies earned only $8.2-billion in profits in China in 2003. By comparison, they earned $7.1-billion in profits in Australia and $14.3-billion in Mexico -- two countries with far smaller populations and much less hype than China.

Joe Studwell, editor-in-chief of the China Economic Quarterly, says the profits in China have been concentrated in a small handful of foreign companies, including fast-food chains (which face no competition from state interests) and telecommunications firms (which he says were the recipients of "lucky breaks" by gaining entry to heavily regulated industries).
Geoffrey_York  China  ProQuest  risks  investing  dairy  corruption  piracy  rule_of_law  myths 
october 2011 by jerryking
Dr. Wolfowitz, I Presume - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2005 | WSJ | By PAUL A. GIGOT.

Leon Louw, the South African economist, says that in the past 30 years the world has poured $450 billion of aid into Africa, but that average per capita income is lower than it was in the late 1960s. According to the World Bank's data, 39% of sub-Saharan Africa's private wealth was somewhere other than Africa in 1990 -- compared to 3% for South Asia, and only 10% even for Latin America.

Why invest in Africa if Africans won't? "It's a very fair question, and I think part of the answer is to deal with the kinds of regulations and taxes that I've been talking about," Mr. Wolfowitz says. "I'm absolutely sure that part of the answer is dealing with the corruption factor."
interviews  Paul_Wolfowitz  entrepreneurship  World_Bank  Africa  corruption  organizational_culture 
october 2011 by jerryking
Hoover's Institution
July 20, 2005/ WSJ/ op-ed by LAURENCE H. SILBERMAN on the corruption within the FBI.
history  FBI  security_&_intelligence  corruption  lessons_learned  politics  biographies 
may 2011 by jerryking
Nigeria’s Promise, Africa’s Hope - NYTimes.com
By CHINUA ACHEBE
Jan. 15, 2011

At the end of the day, when the liberty was won, we found that we had
not sufficiently reckoned with one incredibly important fact: If you
take someone who has not really been in charge of himself for 300 years
and tell him, “O.K., you are now free,” he will not know where to begin.

This is how I see the chaos in Africa today and the absence of logic in
what we’re doing. Africa’s postcolonial disposition is the result of a
people who have lost the habit of ruling themselves, forgotten their
traditional way of thinking, embracing and engaging the world without
sufficient preparation. We have also had difficulty running the systems
foisted upon us at the dawn of independence by our colonial masters.
Nigeria  Africa  corruption  development  accountability  postcolonial 
january 2011 by jerryking
What Any Goldman Settlement Might Entail - DealBook/White Collar Watch Blog - NYTimes.com
May 6, 2010 | NYT | by Peter J. Henning who's working on a
book, “The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law &
Legal Strategies,” by Oxford Univ. Press. What might it take for GS to
resolve its various lawsuits & inquiries? Threats? 3-fold: (1) SEC's
lawsuit; (2) a slew of private shareholder suits that largely piggyback
the S.E.C. claims; (3) a DoJ investigation. The SEC’s fraud case
presents the most immediate threat to GS, DoJ investigation could have
the greatest impact if it develops into a full-blown threat of
prosecution, while the private suits are of less importance as they pose
little if any threat to the GS’s continuing operations. For the SEC:
($=monetary penalties), appt. of an outside monitor to oversee GS’s
compliance with the terms of the settlement, require GS to appoint a
different person as chair; For the DoJ --difficult for GS to negotiate
some type of resolution; For Private Litigants there's whether the GS
board breached its fiduciary duty.
anticipating  books  corruption  Department_of_Justice  financial_penalties  Goldman_Sachs  legal  legal_strategies  SEC  think_threes  white-collar  white-collar_crime 
may 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Guest Columnist - Africa Reboots - NYTimes.com
April 17, 2010 | New York Times | By BONO...."We managed to
hear a surprising thing. Harmony ... flowing from two sides that in the
past have often been discordant: Africa’s emerging entrepreneurial class
and its civil-society activists.

Civil society as a rule sees business as, well, a little uncivil.
Business tends to see activists as, well, a little too active. But in
Africa, at least from what I’ve just seen, this is starting to change.
The energy of these opposing forces coming together is filling offices,
boardrooms and bars. The reason is that both these groups — the private
sector and civil society — see poor governance as the biggest obstacle
they face. So they are working together on redefining the rules of the
African game.
Africa  entrepreneurship  infrastructure  Mo_Ibrahim  misgovernance  Bono  civil_society  mismanagement  misrule  corruption  poor_governance 
april 2010 by jerryking
Corruption You Can Count On --- Crooked governments don't inevitably kill an economy; Trouble emerges when the rules of the game are unpredictable
3 April 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By Raymond Fisman.
Raymond Fisman is professor of economics and director of the Social
Enterprise Program at the Columbia Business School. He is author, with
Edward Miguel, of "Economic Gangsters."
corruption  economic_development  LDCs  Zimbabwe  China  Suharto  Indonesia  developing_countries  rules_of_the_game  unpredictability 
april 2010 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton Tells African Leaders to Clean Up Their Act - WSJ.com
AUGUST 6, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | Editorial.

A welcome focus on failed governance.
governance  Africa  Kenya  corruption  Hillary_Clinton 
august 2009 by jerryking
Why Foreign Aid Is Hurting Africa
MARCH 21, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By DAMBISA MOYO

Why Foreign Aid Is Hurting Africa
Money from rich countries has trapped many African nations in a cycle of
corruption, slower economic growth and poverty. Cutting off the flow
would be far more beneficial, says Dambisa Moyo.
Africa  foreign_aid  Dambisa_Moyo  corruption  development  growth 
march 2009 by jerryking
Ending the Wall Street insider’s game
February 8 2006 20:12 | Last updated: February 8 2006 20:12 Financial Times op-ed by Dan Reingold.
SOX  Wall_Street  corruption  insider_information  filetype:pdf  media:document 
february 2009 by jerryking
Hoover's Institution
July 20, 2005 WSJ op-ed by LAURENCE H. SILBERMAN on the corruption within the FBI.
lessons_learned  security_&_intelligence  History  FBI  Hoover  corruption 
february 2009 by jerryking

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