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jerryking : creative_economy   17

The ace of spaces: fashion show producer Alexandre de Betak
SEPTEMBER 22, 2017 Nick Remsen

The producer’s work is now the subject of a new book Betak: Fashion Show Revolution, which chronicles his 30-year career in show-making.....De Betak has sensed the world changing. As the enterprise of fashion has shifted, so has the industry of executing a fashion show.

“It’s not the way it was, we know this,” says de Betak. “It has gone from inner circle-genic to TV-genic to web-genic to social media-genic. The audience for a fashion show is now global, but they are more blasé than ever. We need to think about more angles when we design a set, and not just for the photographers in the pit, because the influencers are taking pictures that are just as important, maybe more so, than theirs. Then, it’s becoming more about video. Stills photos are slightly dying, actually. And, things are getting smaller. All of the information is given on the phone — soon it will be a contact lens.
producers  fashion  creative_class  creative_economy  creative_types 
november 2017 by jerryking
Anatomy of a Hit: How Success Is Measured in Different Creative Fields - Speakeasy - WSJ
Dec 18, 2015 | WSJ | By JON KEEGAN. How do you define a hit podcast, Broadway show or typeface? Explore the nature of cultural hits.

when it comes to other cultural works, defining a hit is not as easy. We set out to explore how success is measured—what factors matter in assessing a hit in various creative categories ranging from books to tweets:

Audience – How many people viewed the work?
Sales – How much money was made?
Longevity – How long has the work been available?
Critical acclaim – What praise did the work receive?
art  creative_class  hits  measurements  music  paintings  blockbusters  entertainment  entertainment_industry  creative_economy  auctions  YouTube  Twitter 
december 2015 by jerryking
If the artists starve, we’ll all go hungry - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 19 2015

After 20 years in the music business, she says she’s seeing songwriters “leaving in droves. If you can’t make a living, if you can’t afford go to the dentist, you’re going to leave.” This is a lament you’ll hear from artists everywhere these days: We can’t afford to do this any more. The well has dried up. Freelance rates are what they were when the first Trudeau was in power. Rents rose, and royalties fell. Novelists are becoming real-estate agents; musicians open coffee shops.

The evidence of this culture shock is in front of our eyes, in the shuttered book shops and video stores and music clubs, yet it’s remarkably unremarked upon. Artists don’t actually to like to complain publicly about their lot in life, knowing the inevitable backlash from those who still believe that creating is not “a real job.... American journalist Scott Timberg argues in his new book, Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class.
artists  Elizabeth_Renzetti  Pandora  streaming  creative_types  songwriters  musicians  free  creative_class  entertainment  piracy  copyright  entertainment_industry  downloads  blockbusters  creative_economy  books  art 
january 2015 by jerryking
Kate Taylor: Digital content may be cheap, but who will pay to create it? - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail (correction included)
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

Internet advocates love to preach choice, diversity and freedom – after all, a VPN can also be used by citizens in China to access content censored by their government – but the great irony of the digital age is that it is killing the economic incentive to create, even as it unlocks the content.....Critics argue that the lumbering entertainment industries should get hip to the Internet as a global, rather than territorial, platform. But if a licence to Netflix U.S. is, in effect, a licence to every citizen on the planet with a computer and the five minutes it takes to set up a VPN, it’s only fair that producers be paid accordingly.

The Netflix debate is just another example of the way the online distribution of digitized content has broken the cultural marketplace so that distributors rake in money while producers struggle to maintain workable businesses. Spotify thrives while musicians are paid pennies; Amazon grows while publishers struggle.
digital_media  Netflix  piracy  VPN  creative_economy  Amazon  Spotify  content_creators  content  entertainment_industry 
january 2015 by jerryking
Artists struggle to survive in age of the blockbuster
Nov. 28 2013 | The Globe and Mail | RUSSELL SMITH.
In the artistic economy, the Internet has not lived up to its hype. For years, the cybergurus liked to tell us about the “long tail”....People in publishing bought this, too....In fact, the blockbuster artistic product is dominating cultural consumption as at no other time in history....The book Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment, by business writer Anita Elberse, argues that the days of the long tail are over in the United States. It makes more sense, she claims, for entertainment giants to plow as much money as they can into guaranteed hits than to cultivate new talent...There are big winners and there are losers – the middle ground is eroding. Publishers are publishing less, not more. Everybody awaits the fall’s big literary-prize nominations with a make-us-or-break-us terror. Every second-tier author spends an hour every day in the dismal abjection of self-promotion – on Facebook, to an audience of 50 fellow authors who couldn’t care less who just got a nice review in the Raccoonville Sentinel....What does any artist do in the age of the blockbuster? Nothing, absolutely nothing, except keep on doing what you like to do. Global economic changes are not your problem (and are nothing you can change with a despairing tweet). Think instead, as you always have, about whether or not you like semicolons and how to describe the black winter sky. There is something romantic about being underground, no?
Russell_Smith  winner-take-all  The_Long_Tail  artists  publishing  niches  hits  books  entertainment  entertainment_industry  blockbusters  creative_economy  Anita_Elberse  creative_class  piracy  copyright 
december 2013 by jerryking
When work quits before you do
October 17, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Margaret Wente. "But
now, the aging creative class has more in common with laid-off
manufacturing workers than you might think. The recession has bashed
them hard. Their age is working against them. And seismic shifts in
technology and the marketplace have made their skills and experience
increasingly irrelevant."
baby_boomers  self-employment  creative_economy  creative_class  economic_downturn  cheap_revolution  seismic_shifts 
october 2009 by jerryking
Diverse, talented city a laggard on innovation; Other North American metropolitan areas such as Boston and Seattle are doing better at commercializing the ideas generated by their creative class
Aug 17, 2009 | Toronto Star. pg. A.11 | Kevin Stolarick. "We
share the concerns of our colleagues at the University of Toronto Cities
Centre whose recent report, The Three Cities within Toronto, showed
that the city's core is becoming gentrified, with visible minorities
moving to the fringes along major transportation arteries." "As we move
into the creative age, Toronto must continue to build on its strengths -
its multicultural and talented workforce - and leverage these to become
more innovative."
downtown_core  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Toronto  creative_economy  economic_development  strengths  multiculturalism  gentrification  income_inequality  commercialization  visible_minorities 
september 2009 by jerryking

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