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jerryking : criminality   63

Let the grocery chains fix Canada’s cannabis-supply mess
January 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

Despite the long run-up to legalization of recreational marijuana last October, demand for legal cannabis is outstripping supply and the retail system is a mess. ....The Ontario government held a lottery last Friday to award licenses for its first 25 stores, which aren’t expected to open until April. Experts say the nascent industry’s nation-wide logistical issues will take months, if not years, to fix.

Who wins out of this chaos? Criminals. Removing the social stigma from cannabis without ensuring robust cultivation and retail networks are in place opens the door to black-market suppliers, the folks the federal Liberals were trying to put out of business when they started down the path to legalization. Who can set things right, by getting cannabis into the hands of those who want it at prices the black market will be hard pressed to match? How about Jim Pattison, along with the Weston and Sobey clans and the folks running Metro Inc. Provincial governments should be looking to the national grocery and drug store chains to deliver on the federal Liberals' promise of a modern approach to marijuana sales.

Mr. Pattison, who runs the 45,000-employee Jim Pattison Group, has been showing shoppers the love for six decades. Think about what greets you when you walk into one of the former car salesman’s Save-On-Foods grocery stores in Western Canada, or a large-format Loblaws, Sobeys and Metro outlet.
Andrew_Willis  black_markets  cannabis  criminality  grocery  retailers  supermarkets  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  gangs  nationwide  organized_crime 
january 2019 by jerryking
Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
Venezuela reaps what Chavez sowed - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

Venezuela’s embattled president, Nicolas Maduro, is reaping what Mr. Chavez sowed. The destruction of the economy through the nationalization of entire industries, hostility toward foreign investors and massive borrowing against the country’s vast oil reserves have left Venezuela on the brink of collapse. The very poor on whose behalf Mr. Chavez and Mr. Maduro claimed to be fighting their revolution are much worse off than they were before this pair took over.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Venezuela  mismanagement  authoritarianism  repression  criminality 
june 2016 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society - NYTimes.com
Devah Pager

This astounding shortfall in black men translates into lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, a greater risk of poverty for families and, by extension, less stable communities. The missing men should be a source of concern to political leaders and policy makers everywhere.

While the 1.5 million number is startling, it actually understates the severity of the crisis that has befallen African-American men since the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, which was quickly followed by the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, which drove up the national prison population more than sevenfold beginning in the 1970s.

In addition to the “missing,” millions more are shut out of society, or are functionally missing, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. At the same time, the surge in imprisonment has further stigmatized blackness itself, so that black men and boys who have never been near a jail now have to fight the presumption of criminality in many aspects of day-to-day life — in encounters with police, in schools, on the streets and on the job....William Julius Wilson wrote in his 1996 book, “When Work Disappears,” for the first time in the 20th century, most adults in many poor inner-city neighborhoods were not working.... Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”
understated  African-Americans  men  criminality  incarceration  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination  books  stereotypes  children  deindustrialization  war_on_drugs  stigmatization  family_breakdown  instability  unemployment  mass_incarceration  joblessness  William_Julius_Wilson  blackness  presumptions 
april 2015 by jerryking
Why crime is plunging but police costs are soaring - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Apr. 17 2014

Orangeville’s police force is the highest-paid in Ontario. Of the 34 municipal employees who made more than $100,000 last year, 14 are cops. Another seven are firefighters. hat’s the way it is across much of Canada. The cops and firefighters are taking home the biggest paycheques in town. While other public-sector salaries are frozen, their pay is rising faster than inflation. And the cost is eating small-town budgets alive.
Margaret_Wente  Ontario  public_sector  criminality  pensions  unions  police_unions  overpaid 
april 2014 by jerryking
Paradise lost - FT.com
December 19, 2013 5:03 pm
Paradise lost

By Robin Wiggleswort

The Caribbean is suffering from crippling government debt, endemic crime and a middle-class brain drain that have contributed to an economic meltdown of alarming proportions...

Persaud blames an “anti-growth coalition” for the Caribbean’s plight, a tight-knit nexus of politicians, business interests and unions that benefit from the status quo – one of the invisible flaws of small states where everyone knows one another. “The Caribbean is at a crossroads, it desperately needs political leadership,” he argues. “It can overcome these challenges, as other small states have, but it requires courage.”

Some fear that the erosion of the local middle classes – both the backbone of civil society as well as the most demanding voters – eases the pressure on politicians to shape up. “The depletion of our brightest graduates, our middle class and some of our most enterprising workers has drained the foundations of our society,” laments Trevor Munroe, a Jamaican academic, former union leader and founder of National Integrity Action, an anti-corruption watchdog. “Remittances are a big plus, but the big minus is the weakening of society’s internal drivers for reform.”
Caribbean  criminality  brain_drain  emigration  small_states  anti-growth  anti-development  tourism  cultural_detachment  middle_class  leadership  courage  civil_society  crony_capitalism  business_interests  cronyism  demanding_voters  debt 
december 2013 by jerryking
Fewer break-ins? Turns out thieves are economists, too - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 01 2013 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH

Special to

Last updated Thursday,
criminality  economics  ideaCity 
august 2013 by jerryking
Globe investigation: The Ford family’s history with drug dealing - The Globe and Mail
Greg McArthur and Shannon Kari


The Globe and Mail


Last updated Saturday, May. 25 2013,
Rob_Ford  criminality 
may 2013 by jerryking
Murder Spike Poses Quandary - WSJ.com
May 6, 2008 | WSJ | By GARY FIELDS.

Murder Spike Poses Quandary
Criminologists Offer Varied Explanations For April's Increase in Some Cities

What is most troubling to people who study crime is that there is no simple explanation for this rise. There are the usual reasons -- the economy, poverty, gangs and crews, and the availability of firearms, but there is one that has been little explored: the migration of the prison culture back to the streets. As nearly 700,000 convicts a year return home, some may be bringing prison culture with them.

"This is part of the price we're paying for 20 years of mass incarceration,"...violence also turns on a central currency within prisons: respect. Disrespect can lead to lethal responses at the slightest provocation....while the overall murder rate has dropped for years, it has been inching up in the black community in recent years. African-Americans make up only 13% of the nation's population, but more are killed in the U.S. than any other racial group, accounting for 49% of all murder victims, according to Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics...."The homicides occur in neighborhoods where folks don't finish high school," Mr. Owens said. "If you can't make the transition from learning to read to reading to learn, you're done."
killings  criminality  African-Americans  violence  incarceration  mass_incarceration  disrespect  prisons  murders 
february 2013 by jerryking
Crossing the line
January 31, 2013 | Kaieteur News | editorial
editorials  Guyana  criminality  violence 
february 2013 by jerryking
Is the real problem here crime or systemic racism?
May 31, 2005 | G & M |Margaret Wente.

What the study did was record the age, race and gender of everybody stopped by police in the course of a year. What it found was that blacks (who make up only 1 per cent of Kingston's population) are stopped nearly three times as often, per capita, as whites. Therefore, it concluded, the police are racially biased.

But if that's true, then the police are also ageist and sexist. Only 7 per cent of the people stopped by police were 55 or older, while 35 per cent were between 15 and 24. And roughly three times more men were stopped than women. Does this mean the police are also biased against young people and men? Most crimes are committed by young men, and a disproportionate number of crimes are committed by young black men. Only 9 % of Toronto's population is black, but more than half of Toronto's 20 "most wanted" are black.
Margaret_Wente  Toronto  African_Canadians  disproportionality  statistics  Kingston  systemic_discrimination  zero-tolerance  expulsions  high_schools  criminality  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities  young_people 
september 2012 by jerryking
Toronto 2012: more guns, fewer resources
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | KELLY GRANT AND MATTHEW ROBINSON
Toronto  criminality  neighbourhoods 
july 2012 by jerryking
Some speculative truth about Canada’s new gun crime - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | James Sheptycki.

So we have a poisonous mixture: A pistolized culture of masculinity. A socio-economic structure of exclusion. An illicit opportunity structure in the market for illegal drugs. And rising levels of gun availability on the streets.

There is probably even more to it than that, since society’s reactions are often one-sided. Some people advocate cracking down on the drug economy. Some advocate drug decriminalization. Some say banning guns or bullets will work, or that we need stiffer penalties. Others want better social programs.

These policy struggles, playing out in the context of fiscal crisis, are most often discussed in hyper-masculine terms. Looking for the cheapest bang for the buck, we end up “combatting gangs” or “fighting crime” while going to “war on drugs.”

These amount to attempts at repression. But repression does not solve problems; it displaces them. This suggests that the solutions become part of the problem.

This issue is extremely complex, but these speculations are the start of a plausible explanation to what has been taking place in Canada for some time. But they are only a start.

There is a demand for quick and easy solutions, and the solutions had better be cost-effective and inexpensive. There is impatience when the response from academic criminologists is for further research.

But in the face of such complexity, and to test our understanding, Canadians need to demand evidence-based policymaking. Rationality and reason are required, as well as political will. Gut instinct is no good.
criminality  drugs  economy  evidence_based  guns  gut_feelings  illicit  masculinity  policymaking  political_will  research  social_exclusion  Toronto  violence 
july 2012 by jerryking
Toronto gangs smaller, looser – but packing more heat - The Globe and Mail
ANNA MEHLER PAPERNY

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 08 2012
criminality  Toronto 
june 2012 by jerryking
The death of the Code of Thug Life - The Globe and Mail
Michael C. Chettleburgh

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jun. 04 2012,
thug_code  toronto  criminality  killings 
june 2012 by jerryking
SOMETIMES RACE IS SIMPLY A FACTOR
October 31, 2002 | National Post | Christie Blatchford

As the Star study also apparently revealed, black people represent almost 27% of all violence charges such as homicides, sex assaults and gun-related offences -- a percentage way out of whack in a city where, according to the most recent census figures, only 8.1% of Torontonians described themselves as black.

(Interestingly, the headline on this story, which read ''Black crime rates highest,'' was corrected the next day, lest anyone got the wrong impression: It was true, the correction said, that black Torontonians accounted for the highest amount of violent crime, but that did not mean they have the highest crime rate, ''which the Star's analysis of Toronto police data did not measure.'' Huh?)
Christie_Blatchford  statistics  Julian_Fantino  murders  Toronto  race  criminality  killings  political_correctness  silence  demographic_changes  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  Toronto_Police_Service  criminal_justice_system  violent_crime 
november 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
David Gladstone. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18

For 25 years, I was a principal in the inner city of Toronto and, over all those years, one fact became very clear: Black mothers would not let their children be blamed by a white male authority figure without challenging that authority. A black mother would almost never admit that her child might have been in error in his or her behaviour.

However, I slowly began to understand why. There was no one else around to protect the black mother's child and it made no difference what the child did, the mother was not going to side with white authority against her child. Even when I used black teachers to discuss the issue with the mother, nothing changed.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  silence  teachers  criminality  murders  killings  deaths 
november 2011 by jerryking
U.S. Infiltrating Criminal Groups Across Mexico - NYTimes.com
October 24, 2011
U.S. Agencies Infiltrating Drug Cartels Across Mexico
By GINGER THOMPSON

the United States has opened new law enforcement and intelligence outposts across Mexico in recent years, Washington’s networks of informants have grown there as well...Typically, the officials said, Mexico is kept in the dark about the US’ contacts with its most secret informants — including Mexican law enforcement officers, elected officials and cartel operatives — partly because of concerns about corruption among the Mexican police, and partly because of laws prohibiting American security forces from operating on Mexican soil.
criminality  Mexico  organized_crime  cartels  drugs  DEA  security_&_intelligence  Department_of_Justice  infiltration  informants 
october 2011 by jerryking
Wall of silence crumbled on accused killer of four, Toronto police say - The Globe and Mail
adrian morrow AND carys mills toronto
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011
Toronto  criminality 
october 2011 by jerryking
Exploring the growing threat of cyber crime - The Globe and Mail
colin freeze
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011
cyber_security  hackers  criminality  cybercrimes 
october 2011 by jerryking
The silence that kills
Dec. 15, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial
It was not the justice system that failed Ephraim Brown, an 11-year-old
gunfire victim in Toronto whose two alleged killers were acquitted of
second-degree murder on Monday. It was his community that failed him.

Sixty people were at the outdoor birthday party where he was killed in
July, 2007; only one, a teenage cousin, Kishauna Thomas, now 21, came
forward as a witness.

Impunity endangers everyone.

....The justice system is not something that, like an appliance, can be
taken to a repair shop to be fixed. It depends on people looking out
for one another and willing to do the right thing. When too few people
are engaged enough or brave enough, inevitably, the gangsters feel
empowered, and more innocent people are shot.
criminality  silence  impunity  civics  editorials  Canadian_justice_system  endangered  engaged_citizenry 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Medium - Art-Theft Blogs - NYTimes.com
May 31, 2010 | NYT | By VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN. On the person,
Turbo Paul, who runs two art-theft blogs. Art Hostage,
general-interest chronicle of art heists, and Stolen Vermeer, which
covers the nefarious heist at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in
Boston in 1990.
art  blogging  criminality  heists 
june 2010 by jerryking
Chris Salewicz: Jamaica's 'Constitutional Crisis' - WSJ.com
MAY 28, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CHRIS SALEWICZ. .
Jamaica's Drug Rebellion. Will the country be run by gangsters or
politicians?
Caribbean  criminality  Jamaica 
may 2010 by jerryking
Mexico's Drug Cartels May Have Become Too Powerful to Control - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 21, 2009 WSJ article by By DAVID LUHNOW and JOSé DE
CORDOBA on Mexico's poise on the tipping point into rule by drug
cartels.
law  security  Mexico  drugs  cartels  criminality  tipping_points 
february 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: iPod killer gets adult sentence
February 13, 2009 G&M by CHRISTIE BLATCHFORD on the stabbing death of Michael Oatway on an Ottawa bus three years ago.
African_Canadians  public_transit  criminality  Canadian_Justice_System  Christie_Blatchford  ProQuest 
february 2009 by jerryking
A mother's anguish, poignantly revealed
06-05-2008 The Globe and Mail column by Christie Blatchford on the JCA's Valerie Steele and her trial for perjury.
African_Canadians  youth  criminality  Christie_Blatchford 
january 2009 by jerryking

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