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jerryking : criteria   10

Decisions, decisions ... the five most critical for a leader - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 26, 2015 | Special to The Globe and Mail | ROY OSING

How do you spend your decision-making time? There are numerous possibilities when it comes to which decisions to make yourself and those that you leave for others.

How do you determine the “my decision” areas?

The criteria I used was payback. Where could I add the greatest value to the organization?

It’s not about what you enjoy doing or where your strengths are; it’s about where others will realize the maximum benefit if you focus your decision-making time there.

....Decide on these five strategic issues. These must be owned by the leader and no one else.

(1) The strategic game plan for the organization
(2) The values that shape culture
(3) The talent that gets recruited
(4) The “customer moment” architecture
(5) Aligning activities to the game plan

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On a basic level, a “customer moment” is any interaction between an employee and a customer. Needless to say, customer moments can occur at any time, and with this in mind, businesses are employing strategies to make sure every customer moment is a positive one. With the world becoming more and more connected, via the internet and social media, the potential for customer moments increases exponentially. When you factor in other recent innovations, such as the rise of smart phones and tablets, the sheer amount of potential customer moments becomes astronomical. This has led to the rise of self-service portals, where customers can receive help on many common customer service issues, such as troubleshooting. Businesses have opened up other channels for customer service as well, such as email and chat support.
leaders  decision_making  priorities  focus  serving_others  payback  talent  strategies  values  customer_experience  CEOs  value_creation  moments  organizational_culture  value_added  ROI  criteria  Roy_Osing 
may 2016 by jerryking
Direct Investment in Emerging Companies -- A Different Game
Direct Investment in Emerging Companies -- A Different Game
Dawson, David CView Profile; Collons, Rodger DView Profile. Journal of the American Society of CLU & ChFC40. 6 (Nov 1986):

Successful venture-capital investing demands expertise in assessing business plans and especially the ability of the management team to execute them. To participate in quality deals, the investor must have a plan, a clear commitment, and a high level of credibility. A successful investment plan should focus on 3 or 4 broad investment areas. Prospective investors usually communicate their plans to the venture capital community by publishing their screening and investment criteria. Typical screening criteria relate to: 1. technical investment areas, 2. geography, 3. resource requirements, and 4. size of business. Investment criteria may relate to the total amount to commit, the timing of investments, and the amount to invest in each situation. Once the investment plan and program have been developed, investment selection, management, and monitoring begin. There must be procedures in place to perform the following functions on an ongoing basis: 1. investment evaluation, 2. assessment of co-investors, 3. follow up on investment, and 4. board representation.
ProQuest  start_ups  private_equity  privately_held_companies  quality  venture_capital  vc  investors  team_risk  co-investing  screening  criteria  boards_&_directors_&_governance 
october 2012 by jerryking
Purchasing a Business: The Search Process
Oct 08, 1987 | Harvard Business Review |by Michael J. Roberts, Ennis J. Walton.

Describes the steps necessary to purchase a small to medium size company. Provides an eight-part analytical framework. Issues covered in the framework include the following: the self-assessment, deal criteria, deal sources, resources necessary to purchase a business, the deal process, the evaluation process, negotiating the deal, and adding value and harvesting the venture.
buying_a_business  HBR  frameworks  criteria 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Auditioning for Money": What Do Technology Investors Look For?
Spring 2003| The Journal of Private Equity | Colin M. Mason and Richard T. Harrison.

* What does the company do?
* How big is the market?
* Who are the customers? (a) Existing customers; (b) target customers;(c) what constitutes an ideal customer? (d) Who actually writes the cheque?
* What is the competition?
* What is the company's technical edge over the competition (the USP)?
* How is the product/service a solution to the needs of potential customers?
* What is the route to market?
pitches  Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  auditions  angels  venture_capital  vc  private_equity  criteria  uniqueness  competitive_advantage  start_ups  questions  screening 
march 2012 by jerryking
Free-Market Socialism
I'm old-fashioned enough to believe the best reasons for attending college are learning how (not what) to think---how to amass and weigh evidence, how to hone and evaluate arguments, and how to refine the humanistic and social values that will fit one's employment into a complete life.
letters_to_the_editor  David_Brooks  critical_thinking  Colleges_&_Universities  argumentation  logic_&_reasoning  criteria 
january 2012 by jerryking
Selection Criteria: What does this mean?: Resilience
What interview questions could you ask to assess resilience?

Our workplace is characterised by multiple demands, shifting priorities, short deadlines. This environment can be stressful. What do you do to keep on top of things, to refresh yourself, when working in such an environment?
Tell us about one of the most challenging obstacle you have faced at work? Include what the obstacle was, how you went about dealing with it, and what you learnt from the experience.
As a team leader, it will be important to stay positive when faced with challenges. Tell us about a time when you had to find a way to be positive in the face of something that other staff saw as negative. How did go about achieving this?
Describe the working environment of your current job. How does it demand resilience from you?
criteria  Junior_Achievement  questions  resilience  screening  selection_processes 
november 2011 by jerryking
Stop Looking for Ideas, Look for Problems to Grow Your Business - India Chief Mentor - WSJ
April 19, 2010, | WSJ | By Gautam Gandhi. Stop looking for
good ideas. That’s right, you read this correctly. Please don’t speak of good ideas ever again. Instead tell me about good problems. They'll most likely bring a business opportunity, Where are the problems?

If you look around there are problems everywhere. Question things you
take for granted and think to yourself: Is there a better way? When you
have your next business meeting, whether it is with a client or
customer, ask them what their biggest problems are. You will be
surprised by what people tell you. Hopefully, you will start to notice
patterns and will soon identify a problem to solve. Better still, if it
is a problem that affects you directly.

When you think of the problem that you are going to solve, ensure that:

You are tackling it for a sizable market
People are willing to pay for your solution
You assess your rivals

The last one is important. Never think: “I don’t have any competition.”
growth  problem_solving  pattern_recognition  idea_generation  problems  challenges  worthiness  messiness  uncharted_problems  large_markets  competition  questions  ideas  assumptions  criteria  India  pain_points  discernment  curiosity  dissatisfaction  opportunities  inquisitiveness  Michael_McDerment  worthwhile_problems 
july 2011 by jerryking
Lean start-up thinking that works for all
Oct. 26, 2010 / FT/ Philip D. Broughton. The classic method is
to look at the mkt. for an opportunity, establish a business case,
develop a product, test, validate & finally launch. At each stage,
you gather resources, establish criteria for the next step and try to
adjust as you go. The challenge, though, is that technology &
customer tastes move so fast that the classic method is
inadequate....Rather than wait until all your ducks in a row, iterate
early & often by finding customers willing to help you refine your
product & even buy it in its most primitive form. Don't waste $ by
investing in an unproven product, but rely on customer feedback to tell
you where to spend. The ideas owe much to "agile software development",
an adaptive process that values customer collaboration, responsiveness
& individual input over strict product road maps, tools & mktg.
plans. For traditionalists, agile development may smack of
ill-discipline, when in fact it is just a different kind of discipline.
ProQuest  Philip_Delves_Broughton  start_ups  lean  experimentation  criteria  iterations  early_adopters  Michael_McDerment 
november 2010 by jerryking
Chapter_1.1_Catalyst_for_Growth.
Many corporations are not prepared to institutionalize
corporate entrepreneurship. There are no benchmarks, metrics or
performance criteria for corporate entrepreneurship. Many executives do
not know why new initiatives succeed or fail. A failure rate of fifty
percent for new initiatives is deemed acceptable.
stage-gate  attrition_rates  intrapreneurship  corporate  failure  filetype:pdf  media:document  success_rates  criteria  new_businesses  new_products  large_companies  brands  metrics  benchmarking  kill_rates 
april 2010 by jerryking

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