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jerryking : cryptography   7

Reporter’s Phablet: Is It Time To Panic About Quantum Computing’s Dark Side? - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Sara Castellanos
Sep 15, 2017

At the three-day Quantum Safe Workshop that wrapped up here Wednesday, the general consensus among cryptography experts is that cybersecurity as we know it will be completely upended when a powerful quantum computer comes to market. That is, unless enterprise executives and researchers start preparing now.

“CIOs need to be planning their requirements for quantum safety today,” said Mark Pecen, founder and chairman of a working group for quantum-safe cryptography at the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, one of organizations that hosted the workshop.

Preeminent cryptographers and mathematicians who attended the conference said that when a scalable, fault-tolerant quantum computer is built, it will be able to solve the algorithms that much of today’s encryption relies on. The popular RSA algorithm, which is used to secure e-mail, online banking, e-commerce and devices connected to the internet, is particularly at risk because it’s based on integer factorization. Quantum computers are capable of solving factorization problems perhaps trillions of times faster than a classical computer.

If a powerful quantum computer is built before new algorithms and encryption methods are deployed, “the cyberspace we’re living in right now (will be) chaos,”
CIOs  quantum_computing  dark_side  cyber_security  cryptography 
june 2018 by jerryking
Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau
April 8, 2018 | Financial Times | Kadhim Shubber 10 HOURS AG

Review of [Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau, Yale University Press, $25]

....so Landau’s latest work leaves the reader wishing for a deeper reckoning with these complex issues.

Landau is a respected expert in cryptography and computer security, with a long career both studying and working in the field. She was an engineer at Sun Microsystems for over a decade and is currently a professor in cyber security at Tufts University. Her clean, knowledgeable writing reflects the depth of her expertise — with just a trace of jargon at times — as she traces the tug of war that has played out between law enforcement and cryptographers in recent decades.....Landau persuasively argues that the increasingly digital and interconnected society and economy we inhabit creates vulnerabilities that we ignore at our peril.......Landau is an advocate for strong computer security, and uses this book to reject calls for “back doors” that would allow law enforcement access to encrypted hardware, like iPhones, or messaging apps, such as WhatsApp. But she also encourages governments to become better at proactive “front door” hacking. In the process, she warns, they should not rush to disclose security weaknesses they discover, which inevitably leaves them open for others to exploit......Yet we have seen that the government’s toolbox can also fall into the wrong hands. In 2016 and 2017, a powerful set of hacking tools built by the NSA were leaked by hackers.
Apple  back_doors  books  book_reviews  cryptography  cyber_security  FBI  hacking  nonfiction  Stuxnet  Tim_Cook  vulnerabilities 
april 2018 by jerryking
F.B.I. Director Suggests Bill for iPhone Hacking Topped $1.3 Million - The New York Times
APRIL 21, 2016 | NYT | By ERIC LICHTBLAU and KATIE BENNER

The F.B.I. declined to confirm or deny Thursday whether the bureau had in fact paid at least $1.3 million for the hacking, and it declined to elaborate on Mr. Comey’s suggestive remarks.

But that price tag, if confirmed, appears in line with what other companies have offered for identifying iOS vulnerabilities.

Zerodium, a security firm in Washington that collects and then sells such bugs, said last fall that it would pay $1 million for weaknesses in Apple’s iOS 9 operating system. Hackers eventually claimed that bounty. The iPhone used by the San Bernardino gunman ran iOS 9.

“A number of factors go into pricing these bounties,” said Alex Rice, the co-founder of the security start-up HackerOne CTO, who also started Facebook’s bug bounty program. Mr. Rice said that the highest premiums were paid when the buyer didn’t intend to disclose the flaw to a party that could fix it.
bounties  FBI  hacking  encryption  James_Comey  iPhone  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  exploits 
april 2016 by jerryking
Apple Policy on Bugs May Explain Why Hackers Would Help F.B.I. - The New York Times
MARCH 22, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH and KATIE BENNER.

As Apple’s desktops and mobile phones have gained more market share, and as customers began to entrust more and more of their personal data to their iPhones, Apple products have become far more valuable marks for criminals and spies.....Exploits in Apple’s code have become increasingly coveted over time, especially as its mobile devices have become ubiquitous, with an underground ecosystem of brokers and contractors willing to pay top dollar for them (flaws in Apple’s mobile devices can typically fetch $1 million.)....Unlike firms like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, Mozilla, Uber and other tech companies which all pay outside hackers, via bug bounty programs, to turn over bugs in their products and systems, Apple doesn't do this. So it's not surprising that a third party approached the F.B.I. with claims of being able to unlock an iPhone--and not Apple.
black_markets  exploits  arms_race  FBI  bounties  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  encryption 
march 2016 by jerryking
The Apple Case Will Grope Its Way Into Your Future - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART FEB. 24, 2016

In an Internet of Things world, every home appliance could be turned into a listening post. That’s why the Apple case matters. ... controversy over whether Apple should be forced to unlock an iPhone
Apple  FBI  privacy  Industrial_Internet  connected_devices  Farhad_Manjoo  home_appliances  encryption  surveillance  civil_liberties  cryptography  iPhone 
february 2016 by jerryking

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