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jerryking : cultural_institutions   56

Opinion | How the Superrich Took Over the Museum World
Dec. 14, 2019 | The New York Times | by Michael Massing, the author, most recently, of “Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther and the Fight for the Western Mind.”

The wealthy have always influenced the art scene. But in recent years, in an age of mounting anger over income inequality, they've come to dominate it......
Of MoMA's 51 trustees who vote, 45 work in finance, the corporate world, real estate or law, or are the heirs or spouses of the superrich.....both MoMA and the Met expect wealthy newcomers to their board of trustees to donate millions of dollars as the price of membership..........Art has always depended on wealthy patrons; see the Medicis, Frick and Morgan. In contrast to Europe, where museums receive significant (though now decreasing) state funding, most American museums rely heavily on private donors. .............Many of MoMA’s trustees are devoted collectors of modern and contemporary art, and the museum has benefited accordingly....... with trustees funding or donating to the museum various artistic works.......Yet dependence on the kindness of billionaires comes at a price. Today’s museum world is steeply hierarchical, mirroring the inequality in society at large........MoMA's curators seem very well paid; people in more junior positions much less so........Among the biggest losers in the current system are artists themselves. With art now considered an asset class similar to equities and commodities, collectors are forever on the lookout for rising stars whose work can be bought at bargain prices and then resold for many multiples as their reputation soars. When the market moves on, careers are often shattered (except in the case of a few ever-in-demand stars)......And even those artists who do remain popular usually benefit only from the initial sale of their work; as its value appreciates, the profits go mainly to collectors and auction houses. Museum trustees have ready access to curators and gallery owners who can point out emerging artists whose work they can buy at an early stage and benefit as the demand for it grows.......the most serious concern raised about baronial boards is the possible constraints they place on what museums can exhibit......For example, Why is there not more art inspired by such urgent matters as income inequality, deindustrialization or the rise of populism. Or why was there not more art inspired by the impact of Wall Street on Main Street or the continuing fallout from the 2008 financial crisis — the root of so much unrest in the world today?...... trustees have no decision-making role in its exhibitions, which are determined solely by the museum’s “strong curatorial staff” in regular consultation with artists....Yet a board’s influence need not be overt to be profound; curators are no doubt savvy enough to know how far they can go in challenging a system of which their trustees are such pillars.....For the superwealthy, membership on museum boards brings many benefits, including an increase in social status, access to other powerful people and an enhancement of one’s image.
Is there an alternative to the current system?
An obvious one would be to substantially increase public funding for the arts in general, and museums in particular......In 2018, MoMA received a paltry $22,000 in government funds (from New York City), compared with the $136 million it got from private sources. In fact, MoMA does not seek or receive federal or state funding. But MoMA in fact gets substantial public support through the tax write-offs its wealthy donors receive as well as its own nonprofit status. The public is in effect subsidizing the museum without getting any corresponding say in its governance.
In return for nonprofit status, the government could require MoMA and other museums to allocate a certain portion of board spots to people whose lives are not devoted to making money. The presence of art critics, historians, architects and nonprofit leaders could force museums to consider a much broader array of viewpoints.....As for more direct public funding of museums, this might seem a long shot in modern-day America, but the current political moment has created new opportunities. If taxes on the rich were raised, which most Democratic presidential candidates support, more public funds could be earmarked for museums — and for libraries, performing arts centers and other cultural institutions. 
Accomplisher_Class  art  artists  asset_classes  boards_&_directors_&_governance  collectors  contemporary_art  cultural_institutions  culture  curators  high_net_worth  income_inequality  intellectual_diversity  Manhattan  moguls  MoMA  museums  New_York_City   overachievers   patronage  patrons  philanthropy  public_funding  subsidies  tax-deductible  The_One_Percent 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
The Man With the $13 Billion Checkbook
July 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By John Leland [John Leland, a Metro reporter, joined The Times in 2000. His most recent book is “Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old,” based on a Times series. @johnleland]

In the neglected Harlem of the late 1990s, one dynamic player was the Abyssinian Development Corporation, a nonprofit offshoot of the powerful Abyssinian Baptist Church. Harlem then was littered with abandoned buildings that had been repossessed by the city. The development corporation, led by the Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, leveraged city and private money to restore these shells, then used the profits to acquire and rehab more buildings. Mr. Walker became the organization’s chief operating officer, working out of a basement office to help bring a Pathmark supermarket to 125th Street, the anchor for what would become a thriving commercial corridor in a neighborhood that had been given up for dead.

“Working for Calvin Butts, you saw the power of the black church, the shrewd political instincts of a power player, and the dynamic at the intersection of race, power, geography and culture,” Mr. Walker said. “It gave me tremendous insight into how power at that intersection plays out, and who benefits and who doesn’t benefit.”

Mr. Walker’s time at Abyssinian also taught him what it was like to rely on foundation grants, begging the mighty patron for favors. When he left to join the Rockefeller Foundation and then Ford — and as Abyssinian boomed and busted in a new Harlem — he vowed to change this relationship.
African-Americans  capitalism  Communicating_&_Connecting  contradictions  cultural_institutions  Darren_Walker  Ford_Foundation  Harlem  inequality  museums  patronage  power_brokers  New_York_City  personal_connections  political_power  relationships  tokenism 
july 2019 by jerryking
France urged to return museum artefacts to Africa
November 23, 2018 | Financial Times David Pilling, Africa Editor.

France should permanently return tens of thousands of cultural artefacts plundered from Africa during colonialism, according to a report commissioned by President Emmanuel Macron that could send tremors around the museums of Europe.

In the report, submitted to the French leader on Friday, the authors accused museums with large African collections — much of which was ransacked or purchased under duress — of being part of “a system of appropriation and alienation” that deprived Africans of the “spiritual nourishment that is the foundation of their humanity”.

....more than 90 per cent of the “material cultural legacy” of sub-Saharan Africa — including palace doors, thrones, carved heads and bronzes — was outside the continent. Europeans, it said, were straining to justify their continued possession of such treasure, while “Africans find themselves struggling to recover the thread of an interrupted memory”.

France alone, the report said, had at least 90,000 African objects, including from modern-day Chad, Cameroon, Madagascar, Mali, Ivory Coast, Benin, Republic of Congo, Senegal and Guinea. French collections also had artefacts from Ethiopia and the former British colonies of Ghana and Nigeria. Many items labelled as “gifts” were the spoils of war, it said.
colonialism  France  restitution  museums  Africa  sub-Saharan_Africa  Emmanuel_Macron  artifacts  repatriation  heritage  antiquities  art  art_history  collectibles  cultural_institutions 
november 2018 by jerryking
It’s a Diverse City, but Most Big Museum Boards Are Strikingly White
AUG. 22, 2017 | The New York Times | By ROBIN POGREBIN.

Whether arts groups will make real progress is an open question. Cultural organizations have often struggled to identify minority board members capable of meeting the high donations — often millions of dollars — demanded by the city’s leading arts organizations.

“The hardest nut to crack is going to be the boards,” Mr. Finkelpearl said, adding that executives need to think about ways besides money that trustees of color can add value, namely through their art collections, personal connections or professional expertise.
Bill_de_Blasio  Darren_Walker  New_York_City  Manhattan  museums  cultural_institutions  diversity  leadership  curation  Ford_Foundation  visible_minorities  MoMA  boards_&_directors_&_governance  theatre  African-Americans 
august 2017 by jerryking
A New Dawn at the Met | Departures
By Meryl Gordon on November 04, 2014.

Change usually comes slowly at major cultural institutions. But Campbell has moved rapidly in recent years to try to make the museum a more inviting destination, with mass and class appeal. He is also raising provocative questions about the Met’s identity.... “They’re questioning the future. They’re not playing it safe.”
.....The new sensibility is evident this fall. Visitors will find pop-up theater and musical performances in the galleries, WiFi throughout the museum, apps that allow people to customize their tours....A key question: How to entice millions of people—philistines included—to cross the Met’s august threshold, appealing to an international audience as well as the next generation of museum-goers? Campbell says his priority has been to make the Met less monolithic and easier to navigate. “When I became involved with the search for a new director,” he explains, “I was conscious that we had this great tradition of scholarship but perhaps it was a moment when we needed to bring new energy to the way we engaged with our audience. Little things like numbering the galleries, having new maps and guidebooks in multiple languages, video tours in multiple languages.”...Recognizing that the Met’s most public face these days is no longer its front steps but its website, Campbell has invested in revamping the Met’s digital identity. ...Sree Sreenivasan, who joined the Met as its first chief digital officer in June 2013 after a career at the Columbia Journalism School, is experimenting with social media to expand the museum’s reach, releasing new apps this fall to alert visitors to events and lectures. “We want to give people a daily dose of the Met,” he says. “When parents are thinking about, ‘What do I do with the kids?’ we want to be one of the places they think of. If we can get into their smartphones, they’re likely to stay with us.”
museums  New_York_City  CDO  CEOs  youthquake  cultural_institutions  Sree_Sreenivasan  Philippe_de_Montebello  digital_strategies  digital_identity  mapping  wayfinding  multilingual  playing_it_safe 
december 2016 by jerryking
No Canadians need apply: the worrying trend in arts hiring - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 05, 2016

What is worrying is the pattern: It suggests that Canadian cultural institutions are not nurturing their own talents.

If Canadian curators cannot aspire to eventually manage the museums where they work, or Canadian stage directors need never consider running Canada’s festivals, they will not give their institutions the best of themselves. They will either slump into the self-fulfilling prophecy of lower expectations or they will go abroad.

Of course, museum and festival management is, like many a business, an increasingly global game and these things do go through cycles – Anderson was rapidly replaced by one of his Canadian curators, Matthew Teitelbaum, a Torontonian who ran the AGO for 17 years before moving to the helm of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts last year.

But the recent trend suggests that the boards of large Canadian institutions need to band together to discuss how they can better mentor and nurture potential leaders.

Perhaps they should also take a careful look at the assumptions they are making in their hiring processes. These big appointments are often trumpeted with announcements that stress the long, complicated and, most of all, international searches that have been undertaken to find candidates. That may actually be part of the problem: the increasing use of headhunters to fill these jobs. Executive-recruitment agencies charging large fees to conduct searches deep into the United States or over to Europe are unlikely to conclude that the best person for the job is sitting down the hall or across the street from the incumbent.
cultural_institutions  CEOs  hiring  glass_ceilings  Canadian  museums  galleries  arts  festivals  boards_&_directors_&_governance  home_grown  mentoring  institutional_memory  executive_search  succession  leadership  curators 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Disrupters: Making New York’s Cultural Boards More Diverse
JULY 30, 2016 | The New York Times| By JACOB BERNSTEIN.

But Dr. Muhammad, the former director of the Schomburg center, cautioned against seeing Mr. Smith’s entry into New York cultural life as a sign that things will change in a meaningful way.

“White people are going to be wealthier on average, wealthier people are going to be in leadership positions more often, and in those positions they’re likely to be part of a network of people in the same social milieu,” Dr. Muhammad said. “There’ll continue to be people like Robert Smith, who happen to be African-American and do wonderful things, but there’s a giant wealth gap between blacks and whites, and it’s only widened in the wake of the great recession. Is this a sign of a trend that black people will be the heads of boards all over the country? I doubt it.”
Darren_Walker  glass_ceilings  African-Americans  high_net_worth  cultural_institutions  boards_&_directors_&_governance  diversity  New_York_City  museums  lawyers  investment_banking  Wall_Street  Harvard  Robert_Smith  racial_disparities 
august 2016 by jerryking
Intellectual maestro craves connections as NACO’s music director - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

The energetic Englishman’s conversation, during a short visit to Toronto, is full of the language of linkage and cross-reference. Just about everything good can be made better, in his view, if the connections between things, people and ideas are stronger... if classical music isn’t reaching parts of the population, he says, it’s because those who perform aren’t doing enough to make links between the music, its history and the way we live today. “I only really connect to a piece of music when I read around it, I mean the broad social context.”

Connecting dots is a familiar theme in the arts and in arts promotion these days, but Shelley is quite willing to chase it into the corners, as they say in hockey. ....tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem (Daniel Doctoroff--Bloomberg's guy)
music  Communicating_&_Connecting  Ottawa  cultural_institutions  connecting_the_dots  artists  orchestras_&_symphonies  classical_music  CEOs  sense-making  contextual  cross-pollination  interconnections 
march 2015 by jerryking
Renaissance man Joseph Rotman was a patron of education - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 27 2015

He and his wife, the former Sandra Frieberg, whom he married in 1959 and with whom he had two children, have long been known for their support for Canadian culture and arts.
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls  tributes  benefactors  uToronto  culture  cultural_institutions  patronage  education  Colleges_&_Universities  renaissance  Renaissance_man 
january 2015 by jerryking
When it comes to the arts, here’s what Toronto needs in a mayor - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

In their statement, they say they want a Toronto that is ambitious, creative, accessible, forward-thinking, responsive, collaborative and imaginative.

They say the city needs a mayor who has a strategic vision, consensus-building leadership skills and a passion for Toronto; who embodies inclusiveness in all interactions; and who balances the budget.

They also identify five things Toronto needs in order to thrive: a creative and innovative economy, healthy and productive citizens, a vibrant cultural sector, affordable and accessible transportation, and beautiful and connected neighbourhoods and green spaces.
cultural_institutions  art  museums  Toronto  elections  mayoral  ROM  AGO  TIFF  neighbourhoods  parks  public_spaces  forward-thinking  green_spaces 
july 2014 by jerryking
A Spanish lesson in economics - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 20 2014

The lesson here is that public infrastructure projects are necessary to promote arts and culture, but they need to be considered carefully in terms of size, scope and cost. They should be beautiful and inspiring, but they cannot become the ego-driven projects of mayors or architects. Unlike government spending on education or health, which can be scaled up, down or redesigned over time, a huge public infrastructure project has one chance to get it right.

I’m certainly no expert on the Spanish economy, and the country and its people have so many wonderful attributes that it’s impossible to not love the place. And certainly Canada has its share of service failures, publicly funded white elephants and other blunders. The point is that economics is everywhere – even when you’re at a Spanish café gulping an ice-cold Agua de Valencia (don’t ask – just go to Valencia and order one.)
circumspection  cultural_institutions  economics  infrastructure  olive_oils  publicly_funded  Spain  Todd_Hirsch  tourism  travel  Valencia  white_elephants 
june 2014 by jerryking
Toronto the good time – who knew? - The Globe and Mail
LYSIANE GAGNON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 21 2014
Toronto  Montreal  culture  cultural_institutions  things_to_do 
may 2014 by jerryking
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada Add to ...
Subscribers Only

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Mar. 27 2014
Todd_Hirsch  Iceland  art  artists  culture  arts  cultural_institutions  creativity  prosperity  creative_class  funding  fine_arts 
march 2014 by jerryking
The CBC: What’s it good for, without hockey? - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | editorial

Losing hockey is the best thing that could have happened to the CBC. A national institution that long ago lost its way has been given the chance – possibly its last chance – to find its soul. NHL hockey, the most popular pastime in this country, doesn’t need the CBC. And the CBC, if it’s to be what a public broadcaster should be, doesn’t need the NHL.

If the CBC did not exist, would we create it? And to do what?

The strongest argument for the CBC goes something like this: There are some public goods that the free market will not deliver, or will not deliver well enough, and so we create public institutions to do the job. Think of museums, libraries and parks. These would be very different without public support, and in some cases they might not exist at all. There’s a compelling logic to taxpayer backing for the National Gallery of Canada or the Canadian War Museum, or hundreds of other cultural institutions and historical sites. The CBC is, in part, such an institution....Hockey reveals what should have been obvious all along: Popular programming doesn’t need taxpayer support. We don’t need a CBC to compete with the private sector. We need a CBC that goes where the private sector isn’t, doing important things that are necessary but may be less popular.

Consider arts and cultural programming – something that CBC television used to do a lot more of, and then in recent years stepped back from. Or educational and children’s programming. Documentaries. Regional programming. Producing intellectually ambitious Canadian dramas and movies....So here’s a radical proposal to ensure that the CBC retains the spirit of a public broadcaster: Get rid of advertising. No ads on radio, no ads on TV, no ads on the website.
CBC  CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  NHL  hockey  editorials  public_goods  public_institutions  cultural_institutions  advertising 
december 2013 by jerryking
The economic imperative for investing in arts and culture
Mar. 27 2013 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.

A better reason why the economy needs a strong cultural scene is that it helps to attract and retain labour. This is especially important for cities trying to draw smart professionals from around the world. The best and brightest workers are global citizens, and if they (or their families) are not pleased with the cultural amenities, they won’t come. Calgary, where I live, is a perfect example: world-class fly fishing and a great rodeo will attract some people, but without fantastic arts and sports amenities, the pool of willing migrants would be shallow....The third reason, however, is the most important. To become the creative, innovative and imaginative citizens that our companies and governments want us to be, Canadians need to willingly expose themselves to new ideas. A vibrant arts and culture community is the easiest way to make this possible.

American neuroscientist Gregory Berns, in the introduction to his 2008 book Iconoclast, wrote: “To see things differently than other people, the most effective solution is to bombard the brain with things it has never encountered before.” Living and travelling abroad is a great way to do this, but for most of us that isn’t a practical reality. Arts and culture on our home turf offer us the chance to “bombard” our brain with new stimulus without leaving town.

The important part, as Dr. Berns puts it, is to concentrate on things your brain has never encountered before. If you’re an opera fan, going to see opera season after season will be enjoyable, but you won’t reap the creative benefits that come from exposure to other things. Maybe you need to skip the next performance of Don Giovanni and take in some indie rock. Or if you’re a hockey nut, turn off the game one night and take in an exhibit of contemporary visual art. You’re not required to enjoy an unfamiliar art or sport (although if you go with an open mind, you’ll be surprised). The point is to purposely take it in, absorb what’s going on, and let your mind be bombarded. It gets the brain’s neurons firing in different ways...We have to stop thinking about arts and culture as simply nice-to-haves. They are just as important as well-maintained roads and bridges. By giving us the chance to stimulate our minds with new ideas and experiences, they give us the opportunity to become more creative. Arts and culture are infrastructure for the mind.
cultural_institutions  art  artists  Calgary  creativity  prosperity  creative_class  funding  fine_arts  value_propositions  mental_dexterity  creative_renewal  Todd_Hirsch  imagination  idea_generation  ideas  iconoclasts  contemporary_art  open_mind  economic_imperatives  the_best_and_brightest 
march 2013 by jerryking
The art of leadership
November 17-18, 2012 | Financial Times pg. 22--Culture | by Peter Aspden.

The arts have the power to build social integration and point to a higher purpose for humanity.

1. Boldness
2. Suppleness
3. Democracy
4. A sense of mission
5. Imagination.
leadership  culture  United_Kingdom  museums  leaders  cultural_institutions  talent  arts  value_propositions  mission-driven  social_integration 
february 2013 by jerryking
The secret race to save Timbuktu’s manuscripts - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 27 2012 | The Globe and Mail | GEOFFREY YORK.

Timbuktu’s greatest cultural treasure: its ancient scholarly manuscripts, are under threat from Radical Islamist rebels who have repeatedly attacked the fabled city’s heritage, taking pickaxes to the tombs of local saints and smashing down a door in a 15th century mosque and demolishing mausoleums...Timbuktu’s most priceless remaining legacy is its vast libraries of crumbling Arabic and African manuscripts, written in ornate calligraphy over the past eight centuries, proof of a historic African intellectual tradition. Some experts consider them as significant as the Dead Sea Scrolls – and an implicit rebuke to the harsh narrow views of the Islamist radicals.

But now the manuscripts, too, could be under threat. And so a covert operation is under way to save them....The manuscripts, dating back to the 13th century, are evidence of ancient African and Islamist written scholarship, contradicting the myth of a purely oral tradition on the continent.

Many of the manuscripts are religious documents, but others are intellectual treatises on medicine, astronomy, literature, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law and philosophy. Many were brought to Timbuktu in camel caravans by scholars from Cairo, Baghdad and Persia who trekked to the city when it was one of the world’s greatest centres of Islamic learning. In the Middle Ages, when Europe was stagnating, the African city had 180 religious schools and a university with 20,000 students.

Timbuktu fell into decline after Moroccan invasions and French colonization, but its ancient gold-lettered manuscripts were preserved by dozens of owners, mostly private citizens, who kept them in wooden trunks or in their own libraries.

Today, under the occupation of the radical jihadists, the manuscripts face a range of threats. Conservation experts have fled the city, so the documents could be damaged by insects, mice, sand, dust or extreme temperatures. Or the Islamist militants could decide to raise money by looting and selling the documents.
Mali  Africa  Timbuktu  Geoffrey_York  cultural_institutions  covert_operations  antiquities  art_history  threats  art  collectors  collectibles  Islamists  sub-Saharan_Africa  digitalization 
december 2012 by jerryking
We are what we keep: Canada's archives are in crisis
April 23, 2005 | Globe & Mail | by Guy Vanderhaeghe.

Expensive environmental controls are necessary to preserve aging, brittle paper, and archival work is extremely labour-intensive: Archivists must pore over volumes of material, organize it and write users’ manuals so researchers can locate information. The federal government provides assistance to the Canadian Council of Archives to fund projects, train staff and co—ordinate programs. In 1992-93, this budget was roughly $2.8million, but by 1998-99 it had fallen to $1 .8-million. (If no cuts had been instituted and funding had kept pace with inflation, the CCA grant would now be $3.5-million.)
In terms of federal expenditure, this is a minuscule amount, and downright paltry when weighed against need. The operating budget of 51 per cent of this country's archives is $50,000 or less, and in a third of the archives 41 per cent of holdings remain unprocessed and therefore inaccessible. More alarming, archives report that annual rates of acquisition have increased 200 to 700 per cent since 1985. In little more than a year, all storage space will be exhausted....
Statistics are a bloodless affair, apt to bewilder rather than enlighten. What do these figures mean? Certainly they suggest that part of our heritage is in danger. Certainly they suggest that the federal government ought to play a larger role in helping archives, and in particular our smaller institutions, to collect, preserve, and make usable the raw stuff from which the narratives of this nation can be constructed. Archivists have a saying: "We are what we keep." What we do not keep now is likely to be forever lost, inducing historical amnesia.
crisis  archives  Canada  heritage  history  cultural_institutions  historical_amnesia  preservation 
august 2012 by jerryking
Culture keepers
September 15, 2002 | Library journal | Andrew Richard Albanese.

An archival challenge

With the conference firmly focused on what lies ahead for African American librarianship, securing a brighter future, librarians said, requires preserving the past. ln that regard, African American librarians face a massive challenge and one that needs action. Over the course of the conference there were a number of sessions that focused on preservation issues, including digital archive initiatives. One session, "Preserving Cultures," summed up the archival issues at hand and detailed new problem-solving efforts. Librarians are particularly concerned about how little is currently known about the wealth of important historical materials pertaining to black history that is moldering in attics or being put on the curb. Brooklyn College's Chantel Bell captured the challenge of black librarians in discussing her effort to archive the records of Brooklyn's large Caribbean population Through her efforts, which include archiving as well as offering archival advice, she is attempting to keep the history of a vibrant community from being "permanently lost."
African-Americans  libraries  marketing  archives  historical_amnesia  preservation  cultural_institutions  history  Caribbean  Brooklyn 
august 2012 by jerryking
Innovation helps Royal Conservatory hit all the right notes - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 14, 2012

At a time when many cultural organizations struggle to stay on their feet, the 125-year-old conservatory is expanding aggressively, through a year-old alliance with Carnegie, an ambitious plan for online education, and an arts-based education program aimed at keeping at-risk kids in school. ideas for BHS???
innovation  music  cultural_institutions  online_education  branding  BHS  arts 
may 2012 by jerryking
Charles Murray on the New American Divide - WSJ.com
JANUARY 21, 2012 | WSJ | By CHARLES MURRAY

The New American Divide
The ideal of an 'American way of life' is fading as the working class falls further away from institutions like marriage and religion and the upper class becomes more isolated. Charles Murray on what's cleaving America, and why.

When Americans used to brag about "the American way of life"—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity.

Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America's core cultural institutions.
Charles_Murray  family_breakdown  marriage  religion  social_integration  social_classes  '50s  '60s  values  civics  underclass  cultural_institutions  social_fabric  whites  working_class  fault_lines  hard_work  disintegration  shared_consciousness  upper-income 
january 2012 by jerryking
Dear Book Lover: How to Get Kids to Read - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 1, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CYNTHIA CROSSEN.
I know libraries are under the budget gun today, but I wish they worked
a little harder at sales. "Too many libraries run like 'Helpy-Selfy
Supermarkets,'" wrote Margaret A. Edwards in her tart manual/memoir
about libraries and young adults, "The Fair Garden and the Swarm of
Beasts." "Many other institutions that serve the public and believe in
their product put skilled salespeople on the floor, not behind desks
waiting for the customer to approach them."
reading  howto  youth  libraries  books  cultural_institutions  sales  selling  memoirs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Ballet Gets Personal in New Ads - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ERICA ORDEN.
"New York City Ballet's new marketing campaign features a relaxed,
casually sexy aesthetic that represents a radical image overhaul for the
company, part of its most significant effort yet to appeal to the
younger New Yorkers it hopes will become future patrons. With its fall
season beginning Sept. 14, the ballet will begin targeting downtown
Manhattan neighborhoods with a series of nighttime outdoor projections
and will deploy "brand ambassadors" who will distribute vouchers for
two-for-one tickets. It is also increasing its subway advertising,
having purchased all of the rush-hour advertising space on the 42nd
Street Shuttle subway line for the entire month of September, a first
for the company."
ballet  dance  cultural_institutions  marketing  advertising  New_York_City 
september 2010 by jerryking
Museums: No More 'Cathedrals of Culture' - WSJ.com
AUGUST 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JUDITH H.
DOBRZYNSKI .Current thinking goes much deeper. Many young directors see
museums as modern-day "town squares," social places where members of the
community may gather, drawn by art, perhaps, for conversation or music
or whatever. They believe that future museum-goers won't be satisfied by
simply looking at art, but rather prefer to participate in it or
interact with it.
museums  leadership  cultural_institutions  youth  quake  participation  participatory  customer_experience 
august 2010 by jerryking
Roman Polanski, freedom fighter - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 01, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Margaret Wente. Op-ed on
the artistic world's reaction to Roman Polanski's arrest last week in
Switzerland.
Margaret_Wente  artists  cultural_institutions  Roman_Polanski  films  movies  radical_chic 
october 2009 by jerryking
It's a Success, but Is That Enough - The New York Times
Sunday, October 27, 1996 | New York Times | By PETER MARKS.
About the business of New York City theater. Could use of strategic or
larger, questions. Could that perennial basket case of the American
stage, the Vivian Beaumont Theater, be saved? It was not an issue of
landmark preservation but of artistic rescue. What kind of theater is it
going to be? This is an age when audiences look increasingly to the
nonprofit theater for original work, when big institutions like the
Joseph Papp Public Theater and the Manhattan Theater Club seek to be
players on Broadway. Will Lincoln Center Theater choose to become even
more commercial, or will it use its money and power to become the
leading creative force in the nation for new theater? Membership
strategy
theatre  Lincoln_Center  UFSC  strategy  cultural_institutions 
july 2009 by jerryking
The exhibitionists
March 2008 |The Globe and Mail | Joanna Pachner. Gail Lord,
president of Toronto's Lord Cultural Resources Inc. (LCRI). Lord and her
husband, Barry, are the go-to couple for anyone looking to cash in on
the global museum boom. Over the past 25 years, LCRI has had a hand in
most significant building or expansion projects in the field, advising
the Bilbao to focus on its Spanish heritage; crafting the concept and
designing the facilities for the planned September 11 Memorial &
Museum on the site of the former World Trade Center. LCRI has run
architectural competitions, drafted operating and program plans or
conducted visitor research for the Louvre, the Tate Modern and the
Smithsonian. In Canada, the Lords put most of the flesh on the bones of
the Asper family's dream for the Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg,
among numerous other projects.
cultural_institutions  entrepreneur  museums 
may 2009 by jerryking
Firms Funding Arts Seek a Return - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 9, 2007 WSJ article by ROBERT J. HUGHES. Businesses
are trying to connect their philanthropy much more directly with their
business goals
(1) many arts fund-raisers are now negotiating with a company's
marketing department, not just its philanthropic arm.
(2) Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.
cultural_institutions  philanthropy  fundraising  nonprofit  strategic  sponsorships 
march 2009 by jerryking
My museum, myself: Financial News - Yahoo! Finance
February 5, 12:08 pm ET Fortune Magazine article by Peter
Gumbel, Europe editor on the gorwth of privately funded and owned
museums that are open to the public.
high_net_worth  museums  cultural_institutions 
february 2009 by jerryking
Conference to explore creativity in urban centres
Posted on 11/02/09 by JEFF GRAY.

In a partnership with the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto - headed by urban thinker Richard Florida - the city of Toronto will spend $10,000 on an international conference this June on "cultural mapping."

The conference, highlighted in yesterday's city budget, will be called Placing Creativity. It will include international cultural policy researchers and "explore the connection between place, creativity and the economy."

The event, billed in a budget document as a "major gathering of international thinkers," will focus on the geographic discipline of "cultural mapping," which looks at the way artists and art institutions cluster and the effect they have on neighbouring businesses.
creativity  Jeff_Gray  conferences  physical_place  spillover  ideacity  creative_types  urban  cultural_mapping  clusters  artists  cultural_institutions  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
february 2009 by jerryking
Arts Organizations Turn to Him for Advice - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 18, 2009, WSJ interview with WILLIAM TRIPLETT. Michael
Kaiser, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing
Arts, announces a free consulting program for any troubled arts
organizations in the U.S. Kaiser authored, "The Art of the
Turnaround: Creating and Maintaining Healthy Arts Organizations,"
marketing  nonprofit  ECONOMY  management_consulting  cultural_institutions  troubleshooting  turnarounds  leadership 
february 2009 by jerryking
The Arts Need Better Arguments - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 17, 2009, WSJ article by GREG SANDOW.

The arts are going to need a better strategy. And in the end it's going to have to come from art itself, from the benefits art brings, in a world where popular culture -- which has gotten smart and serious -- also helps bring depth and meaning to our lives.

That's the kicker: the popular culture part. Once we figure that out, we can leave our shaky arguments behind and really try to prove we matter.
strategy  funding  fine_arts  value_propositions  contemporary_art  art  artists  economic_stimulus  imagination  creativity  open_mind  ideas  popular_culture  cultural_institutions  prosperity  creative_class 
february 2009 by jerryking
THE ART OF THE PHILANTHROPIC DEAL HOW CHARITIES COURT THE RICH 1. IDENTIFY2. SEDUCE 3. IMMORTALIZE
June 14, 2008 G&M article by KELLY GRANT that documents how
behind-the-scenes tale of how Toronto's hospitals, universities and
cultural institutions win the eye-popping donations that put rival
cities to shame. Re. P. Condon.
charities  Colleges_&_Universities  cultural_institutions  donations  donors  fundraising  gift_ideas  high_net_worth  hospitals  philanthropy  recognition_policies  tips  Toronto 
february 2009 by jerryking
Michael Conforti: He's a Museum Leader For These Troubled Times
* JANUARY 27, 2009 WSJ article By LEE ROSENBAUM profiling
Michael Conforti's challenges as president of the Association of Art
Museum Directors (AAMD), as museums nationwide experience challenges
that have led to substantial reductions in programs, exhibitions,
capital projects and staffing -- collateral damage from a global
financial drubbing that walloped museum donors, retail sales and, most
critically, endowments.
fine_arts  leadership  crisis  artists  museums  cultural_institutions  collateral_damage 
january 2009 by jerryking
The Eye of the Met's Director - WSJ.com
JANUARY 10, 2008 article by ERIC GIBSON profiling the retiring
Metropolitan Museum director Philippe de Montebello and his
contributions to the field.
inspiration  profile  museums  cultural_institutions  fine_arts  Philippe_de_Montebello 
january 2009 by jerryking

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