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jerryking : customer_focus   6

Nokia a lesson for backers of Canada’s nanny state - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | BRIAN LEE CROWLEY.

How did it all go so wrong? And what might Canada learn from Finland’s downfall?

One obvious conclusion is not to put all your eggs in one basket, but it goes well beyond that. There was a time when economic change worked slowly enough that you could get a generation or two’s employment out of an industry before it was overtaken by innovation. Detroit dominated automobile manufacturing for many decades before its own complacency and the innovativeness of European and Asian producers came into play. In a similar vein, Nokia allowed itself to believe in its own infallibility, and Finland meekly followed suit. But the forces of change are now so powerful and lightning fast that sometimes a single product release from a competitor can signal the death knell of a previously healthy company or industry....Canada is rife with industries with their heads stuck in the sand, almost invariably because they believe they can shelter behind a friendly bureaucrat with a rulebook.

Examples abound in fields as diverse as telecoms, dairy, airlines, broadcasting, taxis and transport. Could there have been a bigger farce than the CRTC’s attempt to manhandle online content provider Netflix?...The real lesson of Nokia’s demise was that there is no substitute for being driven by what customers want, which is quality products and service at the lowest possible price...Every deviation from this relentless focus on what customers actually want makes your market a tasty morsel for the disrupters.
concentration_risk  Nokia  Finland  mobile_phones  disruption  Netflix  Uber  CRTC  complacency  accelerated_lifecycles  protectionism  nanny_state  customer_focus  change_agents  Finnish  demand-driven  lessons_learned  automotive_industry  downfall  change  warning_signs  signals  customer-driven  infallibility  overconfidence  hubris  staying_hungry 
october 2014 by jerryking
"Portrait of a perfect salesman."
3 May 2012| Financial Times | Philip Delves Broughton.

Tips for closing any deal

Know the odds

Most salespeople face far more rejection than acceptance. Knowing how many calls or meetings it takes to make each sale helps develop the positive attitude vital to succeed. After all, 99 rejections may be just the prelude to that triumphant yes.

Find a selling environment that suits you

Some people are great seducers, others dogged persuaders. Some like to make lots of sales each day, others prefer making one a year. Some enjoy high financial incentives, others thrive on the human relationships. Decide who you are first, then find a sales role that suits your personality type.

Be your customer's partner not their adversary

Great salespeople create value around products and services that they can convey and deliver to their customers. Paying attention and acting in the interests of your customer rather than yourself is very difficult. But as information about price and features becomes more widely available, service and relationships become the real value in each sale.
sales  selling  Philip_Delves_Broughton  Salesforce  character_traits  personality_types/traits  customer_centricity  ratios  partnerships  relationships  rejections  salesmanship  salespeople  success_rates  customer_focus  pay_attention  positive_thinking  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2012 by jerryking
Respond to All (Relevant) E-mail Yourself
April 13, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Chris Guillebeau. In a
personality-driven business, the best way to connect with customers is
to answer their e-mails yourself, counsels Chris Guillebeau.
e-mail  etiquette  advice  customer_focus  Communicating_&_Connecting 
august 2010 by jerryking
How can I help you? Jim Stengel is head of marketing for Procter & Gamble, the world's biggest advertiser.
Feb 4, 2006 | Financial Times pg. 16 | GARY SILVERMAN. P&G
is trying to gain the attention of consumers through deeds - offering
advice, doing favours and displaying the kind of cultural empathy you
would expect of a charity or a religious organisation.
P&G  advertising  advertising_agencies  customer_focus  customer_centricity 
june 2010 by jerryking
Introduction: Customer Focus - HBR.org
May 2007 | HBR | Customers are the real employer—the people
who fund our paychecks, the only guarantors of our jobs. Because the
customer’s power is very real, the dynamics of business drive everything
toward commoditization. As surely as springtime melts snowbanks,
markets erode profits. A company can respond to melting margins in one
of four ways. It can surrender, giving up differentiation and competing
on efficiency and cost. It can consolidate power by buying its rivals,
figuring that the biggest snowbanks survive longest. It can innovate,
leaving behind the commoditized old and making money from that which is
still fresh and profitable. Or it can differentiate not just its
offerings but its approach to customers as well: It can cleverly define
segments of customers and sell only to those for whom it can create
especially valuable offerings or work with individual customers to
combine its products and services into unique packages, often described
as “solutions.”
HBR  customer_focus  commoditization  customer_centricity  consolidation  innovation  differentiation  bespoke  personalization  customer_segmentation  value_propositions  solutions  solution-finders  packagers 
october 2009 by jerryking

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