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jerryking : customer_satisfaction   7

Also Stalking the Fund Industry: Obsolescence - WSJ.com
Dec. 10, 2003 | WSJ | Holman W. Jenkins.

Quiz for economists: Suppose you have a competitive, transparent industry that one day begins acting in a more short-sighted, exploitative way towards its customers. What's really going on?

Here's a hint: Think of the gradual slide toward sleazier marketing by the traditional long-distance companies. When your business has a future, you invest in customer relationships. When you see your future going away, you milk them like the wasting assets they are. Big swaths of the fund management business are behaving exactly like an industry in decline...Mutual funds exploded in the 1990s, growing from less than $2 trillion in assets to $7 trillion. A long bull market helped to conceal the fact many of these entrants brought no value to the table. Their managers were, on average, merely as lucky as everyone else to be standing in the right place at the right time.
mutual_funds  Holman_Jenkins  Eliot_Spitzer  industry_analysis  obsolescence  customer_satisfaction  financial_services  luck  short-sightedness  sleaze  customer_relationships  exploitation  bull_markets  imposters  decline  '90s  cash_cows 
december 2013 by jerryking
Four Lessons from Rockstar Games: The Innovator...
September 18, 2013 | Quora | by Ross Simmonds [Life & Pixels]
(1) Give The Customers What They Want - When you focus on giving your customers what they want, the media and customers will do the talking for you. Creating an impact doesn't happen by saying you're going to make one. It happens from actually doing it.
(2) Don't Be Afraid To Break The Rules - In business, it's more important than ever to push boundaries. To be successful, you need to do things that other people question but you know is going to be right for your clients, partners, employees or customers. As the world gets smaller, the importance of pushing boundaries and striving for greatness is at an all-time high. When you're thinking about how your business can generate some additional press or how you could win new business - think differently.
(3) Don't Be Afraid To Kill Your Bad Puppies - It's the idea of killing something that is at the core of what makes you feel uncomfortable....In business, the initial stages of customer research and product development are just one part of the puzzle. As you build your business and establish a client base, you're required to make more decisions as new opportunities arise with your business growth. Decision making quickly becomes a key part of your job as you're forced to make choices on a daily basis...It's our obsession with the past and our own creations that hold our businesses back from continuing to evolve and grow.
(4)Take Pride In The Entire Experience--A great business is one that sweats the little things. It's a business that focuses on the minor details and ensures that their entire business is built on the idea of an experience....At the end of the day, you can get excited about using Instagram for a new promotion or work relentlessly on developing a great content marketing strategy but if your product sucks, you'll fail. The key for business success is to be mindful of these four lessons as you build your business and strive to make it grow.
lessons_learned  culling  customer_satisfaction  execution  detail_oriented  games  rule_breaking  customer_centricity  videogames  kill_rates  Pablo_Picasso  innovators  hard_work  think_differently  stage-gate  attrition_rates 
september 2013 by jerryking
The builder who revived a beloved brand brick by brick
Jul 18, 2011 FT. Andrew Ward. Jorgen Vig Knudstorp ; CEO Lego.
as head of the Danish toy maker, he helped restore the fortunes of a
national institution...Knudstorp saw that painful measures were needed
to turn the company around: layoffs, some mfg. was off shored to eastern
Europe & Mexico, and asset sales of theme parks & non-core
products....One of the hardest challenges for any CEO is to get to the
truth of what a biz is doing right & wrong - & to avoid
complacency when things are going well. Don`t dismiss the 1 % who
complain. Listen extra hard to that 1% because they usually represent a
much bigger proportion of silent unhappiness."

Lego tries to get at the truth by basing a large proportion of managers'
bonuses on customer satisfaction surveys of retailers, parents &
children...Knudstorp maintains a wide netwk of global business &
academic contacts from his time at McK and, before that, at biz schools
in Denmark, the UK & US, and describes himself an eclectic reader.
ProQuest  Lego  CEOs  Denmark  Danish  turnarounds  family-owned_businesses  theme_parks  toys  latent  hidden  complacency  customer_satisfaction  McKinsey  dissatisfaction  complaints  unhappiness 
july 2011 by jerryking

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