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Bracken Bower Prize 2019: excerpts from finalists’ proposals | Financial Times
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Edited excerpts from the book proposals of the three finalists for the 2019 Bracken Bower Prize, backed by the Financial Times and McKinsey.
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(1)The Sinolarity
China’s quest to wire the world and win the future
By Jonathan Hillman

(2) Hacking Social Impact
How to change systems to tackle urgent problems
By Paulo Savaget

(3) InfoSec
Inside the world’s most secure organisations
By Ernesto Zaldivar
books  book_reviews  China  cyberattacks  cyberintrusions  cyber-security  FT  hacks  hackers  Huawei  McKinsey  networks  passwords  phishing  prizes  security_consciousness  teams 
november 2019 by jerryking
How China’s formidable cyber capabilities sparked a tech cold war
July 22, 2019 | | Financial Times | Geoff Dyer.

Chinese Spies: From Chairman Mao to Xi Jinping, by Roger Faligot, translated by Natasha Lehrer, Hurst, RRP£30, 568 pages.... the mercantilist mindset of the US administration and partly in the insecurities of a section of Washington’s foreign policy establishment, prompting the search for new demons to slay. But it is also an inevitable reaction to the aggressive intelligence and surveillance capabilities that China has installed.
Roger Faligot’s history of spying in the Chinese Communist party highlights the turbocharged growth in the nation’s intelligence services......Spying has been baked into the fabric of the Chinese Communist party since its earliest days......Faligot’s subject is the Chinese Communist party and its efforts to develop what he describes as the largest intelligence service in the world. He places particular emphasis on the state security ministry, known as the Guoanbu, the biggest of the non-military spying agencies......The central figure was Zhou Enlai, China’s premier from 1949 to 1976. Zhou’s early career is known more for the diplomatic skills he demonstrated during the second world war but he also developed a taste for clandestine activities as a young man in his twenties in Paris.
......Returning to China in 1928 after a spell at the GRU spy school in the Lenin Hills outside Moscow, Zhou established a series of intelligence networks which, Faligot writes, have a “direct link” with “today’s service”......Two themes, in particular, come through. First, right from the outset, China’s spy agencies latched on to the internet — both as a powerful weapon and as a tool for greater social control....As well as overseas intrusion, the intelligence agencies have been “given a mission to organise a vast system of control of the Chinese population”. Many of the new techniques were first developed in Xinjiang and Tibet, including the compulsory registration of internet users, which has been used to root out cyber-dissidents. ....The second theme is the way that these capabilities have now been harnessed by one all-powerful leader............Xi has conducted a sweeping anti-corruption drive whose biggest scalp was Zhou Yongkang, who in 2015 became the first ever former member of the politburo standing committee to be convicted of serious crimes and sentenced to life in prison. Arresting Zhou allowed Xi to take out a political rival. But it also allowed him to orchestrate a putsch of the security services, which Zhou had been in charge of in the previous administration. During his period as China’s effective spy chief, Zhou had set up what Faligot calls a “parallel diplomacy service” and had also been snooping on all the other senior Chinese leaders. The purge of “the old Zhou Yongkang system,” Faligot concludes, allowed Xi “to retake control of the CCP, the PLA and the secret services.”
books  book_reviews  China  Chinese_Communist_Party  Cold_War  cyberattacks  cyber_warfare  GRU  Guoanbu  new_tech_Cold_War  security_&_intelligence  Tibet  turbocharge  U.S.-China_relations  Xi_Jinping 
july 2019 by jerryking
Canada must not be naive when dealing with China’s authoritarian regime
March 4, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HUGH SEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Claws of the Panda, Jonathan Manthorpe’s new best-selling book, a meticulous and well-researched highly readable history of decades of Canada-China relations, is important because it's a primer on the central challenge of our era – how democracies address the scope and depth of an authoritarian wave now picking up momentum.....The Communist Party of China, its presumption of sovereignty not only at home, but also over ethnic Chinese worldwide, is not about to relinquish or dilute its central and presumptive power and control. It certainly won’t do this as a result of peaceful entreaties from middle powers, however respectful or well-meaning.....while the People’s Republic of China has every right to manage its internal affairs without interference, we also have the right to pursue our own national interest without undue Chinese influence......Manthorpe’s work clearly underlines is the economic, social and political equation at China’s core: Prosperity is the result of central control, focus and a clearly defined Communist Party and state-driven purpose. Qualities we hold as important – the right of dissent, democratic pluralism, freedom from fear – are seen by the Chinese government as weaknesses in our democratic societies to be exploited in the new great game of global trade and diplomatic competition.......Our challenge, in terms of diplomatic, trade and strategic policy, is with the Communist Party and the government and forces it controls, not with the Chinese people.........In assessing the intent of any global competitor, contextual awareness is one of the first requirements for tactical understanding and strategic planning. The revelations of Claws of the Panda offer a clear set of contextual conclusions for a well meaning middle power like Canada......We need new rules of the road.

Our engagement with China must set aside the temptations of presuming fair minded universal intent on the part of Chinese state-controlled instruments, economic, diplomatic or military. We must be more focused on the protection of our own security and freedoms from Chinese subversion, including the freedoms of our fellow Canadians of Chinese extraction. Countries that wish access to our resources, technology and investment on normative terms do not get to launch cyber attacks against us, from military and intelligence units controlled by the state. We must invest more with our allies in counter-intelligence and joint naval, air and cyber capacity in the Asian Pacific, not to threaten China’s legitimate regional dominance, or peaceful global economic aspirations, but to preclude illegitimate adventurism which a Chinese communist authoritarian regime might well pursue if costs and risks to them are unclear.
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Claws of the Panda gives a detailed description of the CCP's campaign to embed agents of influence in Canadian business, politics, media and academia. The party's aims are to be able to turn Canadian public policy to China's advantage, to acquire useful technology and intellectual property, to influence Canada's international diplomacy, and, most important, to be able to monitor and intimidate Chinese Canadians and others it considers dissidents.
authoritarian  alliances  Asia_Pacific  authoritarianism  books  Canada  Canada-China_relations  centralized_control  China  China_rising  Chinese  Chinese-Canadians  Chinese_Communist_Party  counterintelligence  cyberattacks  economic_protectionism  fair_minded  history  Hugh_Segal  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  maritime  mercantilism  middle-powers  naivete  new_rules  primers  rules_of_the_game  security_&_intelligence  situational_awareness  worldviews 
march 2019 by jerryking
Nortel hacking went on for years
FEBRUARY 14, 2012 | FT Alphaville | By Joseph Cotterill.
Chinese hackers had undetected access to sensitive Nortel data for almost a decade from 2000, the WSJ reports. The extent to which Nortel, the once-mighty telecoms giant, was compromised shows the lack of corporate defences against hacking. Nortel didn’t disclose its hacking problem to buyers of its assets. Spy software was so deeply embedded in Nortel computers that investigators failed to spot its existence for years. The SEC last year began pushing companies to classify serious cyber attacks on their infrastructure as “material risks” that may require financial disclosure.
China  Chinese  cyberattacks  cyber_security  cyberintrusions  disclosure  hackers  Nortel  regulators  risks  SEC 
march 2019 by jerryking
Japan gears up for mega hack of its own citizens
February 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leo Lewis.

Yoshitaka Sakurada, Japan’s 68-year-old minister for cyber security, stands ready to press the button next week on an unprecedented hack of 200m internet enabled devices across Japan — a genuinely imaginative, epically-scaled and highly controversial government cyber attack on homes and businesses designed as an empirical test of the nation’s vulnerability. A new law, fraught with public contention over constitutionally-guaranteed privacy, was passed last May and has just come into effect to give the government the right to perform the hack and make this experiment possible. The scope for government over-reach, say critics, cannot be overstated. Webcams, routers and other devices will be targeted in the attacks, which will primarily establish what proportion have no password protection at all, or one that can be easily guessed. At best, say cyber security experts at FireEye, the experiment could rip through corporate Japan’s complacency and elevate security planning from the IT department to the C-suite.

The experiment, which will run for five years and is being administered through the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, is intended to focus on devices that fall into the broadly-defined category of “internet of things” (IoT) — anything from a yoga mat that informs a smartphone of your contortions, to remotely controlled factory robots. And while cyber experts say IoT security may not be the very top priority in the fight against cyber crime and cyber warfare, they see good reasons why Japan has chosen to make its stand here.....warnings that the rise of IoT will create a vast new front of vulnerability unless the security of, for example, a web-enabled yoga mat is taken as seriously by both manufacturers and users as the security of a banking website. The big cyber security consultancies, along with various governments, have historically relied on a range of gauges to calculate the scale of the problem. The Japanese government’s own National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) uses scans of the dark web to estimate that, of the cyber attacks it detected in 2017, 54 per cent targeted IoT devices.
C-suite  cyberattacks  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  dark_web  experimentation  hacks  Industrial_Internet  Japan  overreach  preparation  privacy  readiness  testing  vulnerabilities  white_hats 
february 2019 by jerryking
After a Hiatus, China Accelerates Cyberspying Efforts to Obtain U.S. Technology - The New York Times
By David E. Sanger and Steven Lee Myers
Nov. 29, 2018

Three years ago, President Barack Obama struck a deal with China that few thought was possible: President Xi Jinping agreed to end his nation’s yearslong practice of breaking into the computer systems of American companies, military contractors and government agencies to obtain designs, technology and corporate secrets, usually on behalf of China’s state-owned firms.

The pact was celebrated by the Obama administration as one of the first arms-control agreements for cyberspace — and for 18 months or so, the number of Chinese attacks plummeted. But the victory was fleeting.

Soon after President Trump took office, China’s cyberespionage picked up again and, according to intelligence officials and analysts, accelerated in the last year as trade conflicts and other tensions began to poison relations between the world’s two largest economies.

The nature of China’s espionage has also changed. The hackers of the People’s Liberation Army — whose famed Unit 61398 tore through American companies until its operations from a base in Shanghai were exposed in 2013 — were forced to stand down, some of them indicted by the United States. But now, the officials and analysts say, they have begun to be replaced by stealthier operatives in the country’s intelligence agencies. The new operatives have intensified their focus on America’s commercial and industrial prowess, and on technologies that the Chinese believe can give them a military advantage.
China  cyberattacks  cyber_security  espionage  intellectual_property  international_trade  U.S.  David_Sanger  industrial_espionage  security_&_intelligence  intelligence_analysts 
november 2018 by jerryking
Learning to Attack the Cyberattackers Can’t Happen Fast Enough - The New York Times
By Alina Tugend
Nov. 14, 2018

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. The center was created by Professor Savvides, who is a widely recognized expert in biometrics — the science of measuring and identifying people using facial and iris recognition systems. On any given day, the high-tech space is crowded with computers, robots, and other machines and populated with doctoral students working with him.

CyLab, which includes the center, was founded in 2003 to expand the boundaries of technology and protect people when that technology — or the people using it — poses a threat.

Based in the university’s 25,000-square-foot Collaborative Innovation Center, CyLab works in partnership with roughly 20 corporations — like Boeing, Microsoft and Facebook — and government agencies to do research and education in internet privacy and security.
biometrics  cyberattacks  cyber_security  Carnegie_Mellon  Colleges_&_Universities  offensive_tactics 
november 2018 by jerryking
Facebook’s Security Chief to Depart for Stanford University
Aug. 1, 2018 | The New York Times| By Sheera Frenkel and Kate Conger.

Alex Stamos, Facebook's Security Chief, will exit this month to join Stanford University in September as an adjunct professor and become part of a faculty working group called Information Warfare where he will examine the role of security and technology in society.....In an internal Facebook post from January Stamos wrote that the company’s security team was being reorganized and would no longer operate as a stand-alone entity. Instead, he wrote, Facebook’s security workers would be more closely aligned with the product and engineering teams and focus either on protecting the company’s corporate infrastructure or its users......Stamos had been working with the Stanford cyberpolicy program for several years and had piloted a “hack lab” class this past spring.....At Stanford, he plans to study the upcoming midterms and the role of technology, as well as election security more broadly and the topic of disinformation. He said he would also look at subjects as basic as passwords and try to reimagine how they could be made more secure.........Mr. Stamos also said Information Warfare was a new working group at Stanford with about 14 faculty members across academic disciplines. The group, which will begin meeting this fall, plans to research information warfare tactics and to develop countermeasures. Mr. Stamos said he planned to teach a class for law and policy students on how hackers attack, with the goal of familiarizing future policymakers with common hacking techniques......Stamos wants to address issues including online child safety and the naming of a country or group responsible for a cyberattack.
cyberattacks  cyber_security  Colleges_&_Universities  disinformation  Facebook  information_warfare  security_&_intelligence  Sheryl_Sandberg  Stanford  political_influence  C-suite  countermeasures  hackers 
august 2018 by jerryking
Are you mentally prepared for a cyber attack?
JULY 5, 2017 | FT | by Madhumita Murgia.

“Cyber attacks are not benign. Even when no one suffers physical harm, the opportunity to cause anxiety and stress, instil fear and disrupt everyday life is immense,”.......journalists write about how companies and governments struggle to cope with the fallout from a cyber attack, but the longer-lasting impact on the human psyche has remained largely unexplored. Clearly, the anxiety prompted by cyber attacks is different from that associated with “traditional” acts of terrorism that cause deaths and injury to civilians. .... “Our analysis suggests that the psychological harm of cyber war can affect wellbeing nonetheless.” Identity theft, online threats of personal harm and the disclosure of confidential data such as medical records can cause significant distress........
........Samir Kapuria, a senior executive at Symantec, a global cyber-security company, is at the frontline of damage control, often helping clients after a cyber crime. He admitted that the corporate world was “in a state of urgency” when it came to dealing with the scale and virality of cyber attacks.

“The early 2000s was an era of mass cyber crime, when viruses like Stuxnet were released to disrupt with criminal intent. Today, with attacks like WannaCry and Petya, we are entering the era of intelligence,” says Kapuria, “moving from locks to surveillance to early detection.”
cyber_security  hackers  cyberthreats  malware  cyberattacks  psychology  panic  viruses  security_&_intelligence  Symantec  identity_theft  left_of_the_boom  surveillance  human_psyche  stressful  disaster_preparedness 
may 2018 by jerryking
Cyberattacks Put Russian Fingers on the Switch at Power Plants, U.S. Says
MARCH 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

The Trump administration accused Russia on Thursday of engineering a series of cyberattacks that targeted American and European nuclear power plants and water and electric systems, and could have sabotaged or shut power plants off at will.....Russian hacks had taken an aggressive turn. The attacks were no longer aimed at intelligence gathering, but at potentially sabotaging or shutting down plant operations.....Though a major step toward deterrence, publicly naming countries accused of cyberattacks still is unlikely to shame them into stopping. The United States is struggling to come up with proportionate responses to the wide variety of cyberespionage, vandalism and outright attacks.
Russia  security_&_intelligence  cyberattacks  vandalism  cyber_security  power_grid  infrastructure  NSA  vulnerabilities  hackers  U.S._Cyber_Command  David_Sanger  cyberphysical  physical_world 
march 2018 by jerryking
Pentagon Turns to High-Speed Traders to Fortify Markets Against Cyberattack
Oct. 15, 2017 7| WSJ | By Alexander Osipovich.

"What it would be like if a malicious actor wanted to cause havoc on U.S. financial markets?".....Dozens of high-speed traders and others from Wall Street are helping the Pentagon study how hackers could unleash chaos in the U.S. financial system. The Department of Defense’s research arm, DARPA, over the past year and a half has consulted executives at high-frequency trading firms and quantitative hedge funds, and people from exchanges and other financial companies, participants in the discussions said. Officials described the effort, the Financial Markets Vulnerabilities Project, as an early-stage pilot project aimed at identifying market vulnerabilities.

Among the potential scenarios: Hackers could cripple a widely used payroll system; they could inject false information into stock-data feeds, sending trading algorithms out of whack; or they could flood the stock market with fake sell orders and trigger a market crash......Among potential targets that could appeal to hackers given their broad reach are credit-card companies, payment processors and payroll companies such as ADP, which handles the paychecks for one in six U.S. workers, participants said.....The goal of Darpa’s project is to develop a simulation of U.S. markets, which could be used to test scenarios, Such software would need to model complex, interrelated markets—not just stocks but also markets such as futures—as well as the behavior of automated trading systems operating within them....Many quantitative trading firms already do something similar.......
In 2009, military experts took part in a two-day war game exploring a “global financial war” involving China and Russia, according to “Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis,” a 2011 book by James Rickards. ....“Our charge at Darpa is to think far out,” he said. “It’s not ‘What is the attack today?’ but ‘What are the vectors of attack 20 years from now?’”
Pentagon  financial_markets  financial_system  vulnerabilities  DARPA  traders  hedge_funds  Wall_Street  hackers  books  rogue_actors  scenario-planning  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  cyberattacks  high-frequency_trading  pilot_programs  contagions 
october 2017 by jerryking
Maersk CEO Soren Skou on how to survive a cyber attack (reader responses)
The article doesn't tell anything of value. It's a shortcoming regarding the standard of the FT. This CEO doesn't say anything despite that he took part in confcalls. Wow. 

As an outsider it would...
letters_to_the_editor  Maersk  cyber_security  cyberattacks  FT  interpretative 
august 2017 by jerryking
Three ways your business can leverage artificial intelligence - The Globe and Mail
CHRIS CATLIFF
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

There are a multitude of ways most businesses can leverage AI but here are three:

1. Customizing the client experience

Recommendation engines (think Netflix) can personalize the customer experience, especially for front-line employees interacting with clients. Using data about our preferences, algorithms suggest and then employees filter with their emotional intelligence to offer highly customized recommendations. Recommendation engines boost revenue and will continue to play a pivotal role. For employees, AI simplifies decisions and eases work flow – a case of automation complementing the human element.

2. Accuracy in detecting fraud

AI-based systems, compared with traditional software systems used for detecting fraud, are more accurate in detecting fraudulent patterns. By using machine learning algorithms, companies can spot emerging anomalies in the data. Financial institutions are particularly vulnerable to cybercrime, where global losses from card fraud are expected to reach $31-billion in three years, and cyberattacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Security goals and customer experience goals need to be in sync for fraud prevention technologies to be effective.

3. Increasing client engagement

While "chat bots" are AI-based automated chat systems that can simulate human chat without human intervention, they are being extensively applied to revolutionize customer interactions. By identifying context and emotions in a text chat by the human end-user, chat bots respond with the most appropriate reply. In addition, chat bots, over time, collect data on the behaviour and habits of that individual and can learn their preferred behaviour, adapting even more to their needs and moods. By improving customized communication, customers are more likely to be far more engaged with your company.
artificial_intelligence  bots  chatbots  howto  fraud  fraud_detection  recommendation_engines  cyber_security  cyberattacks 
august 2017 by jerryking
Global shipping boss charts course through troubled waters
August 14, 2017 | Financial Times | by Richard Milne.

When AP Moller-Maersk came under cyber attack this year, chief executive Soren Skou was presented with a very basic problem: how to contact anyone. The June attack was so devastating that the Danish conglomerate shut down all its IT systems. The attack hit Maersk hard. Its container ships stood still at sea and its 76 port terminals around the world ground to a halt. ...Skou had no intuitive idea on how to move forward....Skou was “at a loss”, but he decided to do three things quickly.
(1) “I got deep in.” He participated in all crisis calls and meetings. “To begin with, I was just trying to find out what was happening. It was important to be visible, and take some decisions,” he says. Maersk is a conglomerate, so IT workers needed to know whether to get a system working for its oil business or container shipping line first.
(2) He focused on internal and external communication. Maersk sent out daily updates detailing which ports were open and closed; which booking systems were running and more. It also constructed a makeshift booking service from scratch.
(3)Skou says he made sure frontline staff in the 130 countries it operates in were able to “do what you think is right to serve the customer — don’t wait for the HQ, we’ll accept the cost”.

He says that he has learnt there is no way to prevent an attack. But in future, the company must “isolate an attack quicker and restore systems quicker”. He adds that Maersk will now approach its annual risk management exercises in a different spirit. “Until you have experienced something like this — people call them ‘black swan’ events — you don’t realize just what can happen, just how serious it can be.”

Danish conglomerate AP Moller-Maersk is planning to expand into transport and logistics ...

....Mr Skou’s plan for Maersk is about shrinking the company to grow — a “counterintuitive” approach, he concedes. Maersk’s revenues have stagnated since the global financial crisis and the solution has been to jettison what has often been its main provider of profits, the oil business.

In its place, Mr Skou has already placed his bet on consolidation in the shipping industry.....His real push is in bringing together the container shipping, port terminals, and freight forwarding businesses so as to make it “as simple to send a container from one end of the world to the other as it is to send a parcel with FedEx or UPS”. That requires quite a cultural shift in a group where independence was previously prized.....Another priority is to digitalise the group. “It is pretty messy,” Mr Skou says cheerfully. Unlike most businesses selling to consumers who offer few possibilities to change much, almost everything is up for negotiation between Maersk and its business customers — from delivery time, destination, cost, speed, and so on. “It’s easy to talk about digitalising things; it’s quite difficult to do in a B2B environment. It’s hard to digitalise that complexity,”
crisis  crisis_management  malware  cyber_security  cyberattacks  conglomerates  black_swan  improbables  CEOs  Denmark  Danish  IT  information_systems  think_threes  post-deal_integration  internal_communications  counterintuitive  digitalization  shipping  ports  containers  Maersk 
august 2017 by jerryking
Businesses must quickly count the cost of cyber crime
8 July /9 July 2017 | Financial Times | Brooke Masters.

Transparency without the full facts can be dangerous....Cyber attacks are frightening and hard for investors to evaluate. Quantify, to the extent possible, the impact as quickly as you can.
computer_viruses  malware  Mondelez  cyber_security  WPP  transparency  cyberattacks  brands 
august 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
Hacks Raise Fear Over N.S.A.’s Hold on Cyberweapons - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER JUNE 28, 2017

The Petya ransomware attack....was built on cyberweapons (i.e. hacking tools that exploited vulnerabilities in Microsoft software) stolen from the NSA in 2016 by Shadow Brokers and made public in April 2017. Now those weapons are being deployed against various U.S. partners include the United Kingdom and Ukraine.....there is growing concern that United States intelligence agencies have rushed to create digital weapons that they cannot keep safe from adversaries or disable once they fall into the wrong hands..... the government “employs a disciplined, high-level interagency decision-making process for disclosure of known vulnerabilities” in software, “unlike any other country in the world.”....Officials fret that the potential damage from the Shadow Brokers leaks could go much further, and the agency’s own weaponry could be used to destroy critical infrastructure in allied nations or in the United States.

“Whether it’s North Korea, Russia, China, Iran or ISIS, almost all of the flash points out there now involve a cyber element,” Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and Central Intelligence Agency chief.....viruses can suddenly mutate into other areas you didn’t intend, more and more,” Mr. Panetta said. “That’s the threat we’re going to face in the near future.”..... ransomware that recently gained the most attention in the Ukraine attack is believed to have been a smoke screen for a deeper assault aimed at destroying victims’ computers entirely. .....Mr. Panetta was among the officials warning years ago of a “cyber Pearl Harbor” that could bring down the American power grid. But he and others never imagined that those same enemies might use the N.S.A.’s own cyberweapons.....rogue actors actors, like North Korea and segments of the Islamic State, who have access to N.S.A. tools who don’t care about economic and other ties between nation states,”.....So long as flaws in computer code exist to create openings for digital weapons and spy tools, security experts say, the N.S.A. is not likely to stop hoarding software vulnerabilities any time soon.
adversaries  CIA  computer_viruses  cyberattacks  cyberthreats  cyberweapons  David_Sanger  exploits  hackers  Leon_Panetta  malware  NSA  North_Korea  Pentagon  power_grid  ransomware  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  SecDef  vulnerabilities 
june 2017 by jerryking
Cautioning Against Future Catastrophes | On Point
May 23, 2017

"Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes."

Richard Clarke, the nation’s former counter terrorism czar, warned the White House about the grave threat posed by Al Qaeda before 9/11…and was ignored. Now he’s back with a new warning. In a new book he explains: experts he calls 'Cassandras' are sounding the alarm about a new host of existential threats from cyberattacks to climate change. And they’re getting ignored. This hour On Point, heeding warnings in a dangerous world
books  Richard_Clarke  warning_signs  catastrophes  counterterrorism  cyberattacks 
june 2017 by jerryking
Hackers Hit Dozens of Countries Exploiting Stolen N.S.A. Tool
MAY 12, 2017 | - The New York Times | By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

Hackers exploiting malicious software stolen from the National Security Agency executed damaging cyberattacks on Friday that hit dozens of countries worldwide, forcing Britain’s public health system to send patients away, freezing computers at Russia’s Interior Ministry and wreaking havoc on tens of thousands of computers elsewhere.....The attacks appeared to be the largest ransomware assault on record, but the scope of the damage was hard to measure. It was not clear if victims were paying the ransom, which began at about $300 to unlock individual computers, or even if those who did pay would regain access to their data.

Security experts described the attacks as the digital equivalent of a perfect storm. They began with a simple phishing email, similar to the one Russian hackers used in the attacks on the Democratic National Committee and other targets last year. They then quickly spread through victims’ systems using a hacking method that the N.S.A. is believed to have developed as part of its arsenal of cyberweapons. And finally they encrypted the computer systems of the victims, locking them out of critical data, including patient records in Britain.
tools  cyber_security  cyberweapons  cyberattacks  vulnerabilities  malware  Microsoft  ransomware  hackers  NSA  exploits  blackmail  David_Sanger 
may 2017 by jerryking
Law firms will pay price for failure to hold off hackers | Evernote Web
31 December/1 January 2017 | Financial Times | Brooke Masters.

"This case of cyber meets securities fraud should serve as a wake-up call for law firms around the world: You are and will be targets of cyber hacking, because you have information available to would-be criminals," Bharara said in a statement....Other professional services firms should take note. This is not the first time the industry has been hit by hackers who specialise in what is becoming known as "outsider trading"....Accounting firms that provide tax advice on mergers, boutique advisory forms, and consultants who weigh in on synergies and downsizing plans are almost certainly on the criminals' hit list....Professional service firms will not be so lucky. Banks and companies pay extremely high prices for outside advice. They expect professionalism and confidentiality in return. Getting hacked by a bunch of Chinese traders is hardly a strong recommendation of either.
Big_Law  Chinese  confidentiality  cyber_security  cyberattacks  hackers  hacking  law_firms  M&A  malware  mergers_&_acquisitions  Preet_Bharara  professional_service_firms  SEC  security_consciousness  securities_fraud  traders 
january 2017 by jerryking
Putin Is Waging Information Warfare. Here’s How to Fight Back. - The New York Times
By MARK GALEOTTIDEC. 14, 2016

the United States and its allies should pursue a strategy of deterrence by denial. Mr. Putin shouldn’t fear retaliation for his information warfare — he should fear that he will fail.

There are several ways to go about this. First, United States institutions need better cybersecurity defenses. Political parties and major newspapers are now targets just as much as the power grid and the Pentagon are. The government has to help provide security when it can — but people have a duty to be more vigilant and recognize that their cybersecurity is about protecting the country, not just their own email accounts. ....Finally, Mr. Putin’s own vanity could be turned into a weapon against him. Every time he overreaches, the American government should point it out. Every time he fails, we need to say so loudly and clearly. We should tell jokes about him. He can rewrite the record in Russia, but the West does not have to contribute to his mythmaking — and we should stop building him up by portraying him as a virtual supervillain.
cyberattacks  Vladimir_Putin  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  retaliation  security_&_intelligence  punitive  phishing  deterrence  economic_warfare  blacklists  retribution  disinformation  campaigns  destabilization  Russia  information_warfare  delegitimization  deception  overreach  power_grid 
december 2016 by jerryking
Why Russian hackers would meddle in U.S. politics - The Globe and Mail
DEREK BURNEY AND FEN OSLER HAMPSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2016

But this is not just simply a titillating scandal in America’s electoral silly season. It sadly points to a fundamental weakness in the United States’ own cyberstrategy and its inability to deal effectively with autocrats who have outsized, imperial ambitions and terrorists who want to wreak havoc. Cyberattacks are increasingly the cornerstone of Russia’s regional and global military and political security strategy. They offset Moscow’s economic weakness.
Russia  hackers  cyber_security  data_breaches  cyberattacks  DNC  Campaign_2016  security_&_intelligence  autocrats 
july 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Cyber Command Chief on What Threats to Fear the Most - WSJ
June 19, 2016 | WSJ |

But the types of threats that we worry most about today that are new are adversaries taking full control of our networks, losing control of our networks, having a hacker appear to be a trusted user......MS. BLUMENSTEIN: Extraordinary investments are required now for cybersecurity. But looked at another way, there’s an extraordinary cost to getting it wrong.

I was talking to one of the CFOs out there who said, “Can you ask, what is the estimated loss?” Is there a total number? Or do you just know specific incidences?

On the military side, you can imagine the difficulty that would cause a commander, if he didn’t trust his own network or his data.
adversaries  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  threats  North_Korea  ISIS  network_risk  capabilities  Russia  China  Sony  data  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  cyberattacks 
june 2016 by jerryking
In the Dark Corners of the Web, a `Spider' Intercepts Hackers
April 22, 2015 | Bloomberg Business| by Edward Robinson

Encircling enterprises with digital force fields to protect against invasion is an outdated strategy, as the intrusions at JPMorgan Chase, Sony, and Target have demonstrated, according to James Chappell, Digital Shadows’ co-founder and chief technology officer. IT systems have simply become too open and diffuse to keep the bad guys out.
“Social media, long supply chains, mobile technology. There is now so much that no longer lives within the castle walls; it lives beyond them,” he says. “You can no longer assume that you’ll never be hacked. You have to assume that you will be.”
Enter the spider, a program of the firm’s own design. Crawling through shadowy corners such as the Deep Web and the Tor network, the program searches 80 million data sources in 26 languages for signs that Digital Shadows’ clients are at risk.
cyberattacks  Digital_Shadows  cyber_security  banks  hackers  malware  United_Kingdom  London  data_breaches  dark_web  pre-emption  network_risk  cyberintrusions  left_of_the_boom 
may 2015 by jerryking
C.I.A. Officers and F.B.I. Agents, Meet Your New Partner: The Analyst - NYTimes.com
MARCH 26, 2015 | NYT |By SCOTT SHANE.

As the FBI & CIA confront an evolving terrorist threat, cyberattacks and other challenges, both are reorganizing in ways intended to empower analysts. That involves the delicate job of meshing the very different cultures of the streetwise agent and the brainy analyst, who reads secret dispatches, pores over intercepted communications, absorbs news media accounts and digests it all.
CIA  FBI  organizational_culture  security_&_intelligence  information_overload  intelligence_analysts  data  analysts  cyberattacks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Sony needs to stop playing the victim - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 25 2014

2014 has us [that]...cyber attacks and hacking scandals are now a fact of life.

According to McAfee Labs 2015 Threat Predictions, cyber attacks will grow in frequency and range in 2015, and some experts believe 2015 could be the year a major company goes out of business because it failed to adequately prepare for a cyber attack.

Indeed, how your brand prepares for this new age of corporate cyber-terrorism could define your business....Sony’s real misstep has less to do with its decision to pull – and then subsequently green light – the movie, and more about their lack of leadership in place to handle this kind of situation. The strategy – or rather, lack thereof – conveyed little confidence or resilience to the public....Sony continues to play the victim card, but executives at the company only have themselves to blame for not clearly communicating the reasons for their decisions to the public and holding strong to that strategy.
crisis  crisis_management  data_breaches  hackers  cyberattacks  cyber_security  victimhood  Sony_Pictures  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  threats  missteps  brands  preparation  frequency_and_severity 
december 2014 by jerryking
Holman Jenkins: Sony Lesson: Don’t Get Hacked - WSJ
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Dec. 19, 2014

What we want to know, the FBI is unlikely to find out: What exactly North Korea’s role was and how it may have stimulated others to act on its behalf. North Korean hackers stand on the shoulders of giants—Russian content thieves, Chinese business-secret spies, the politically minded hacktivsts who’ve been strafing Sony for a decade. Hacking is a swarm effort. Participants often don’t even know each other’s real names and nationalities. Don’t be surprised if hacker networks are also full of U.S. agents working for various government departments. Arrests might not have been made in the PlayStation case if a key participant hadn’t been an FBI informant....How Sony’s data security, given this history, could have been so third-rate is a mystery for a future business-school case study....
Holman_Jenkins  lessons_learned  hackers  cyber_security  North_Korea  cyber_warfare  Sony  vulnerabilities  blackmail  cyberattacks 
december 2014 by jerryking
North Korea: How Can the U.S. Respond to Sony Hack Attack? - WSJ
Dec. 20, 2014 | WSJ | By JONATHAN CHENG And JEYUP S. KWAAK.

SEOUL—U.S. President Barack Obama ’s warning on Friday of punitive action against North Korea following the cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment raises a sticky question: what can the world’s leading military and economic power do to an isolated country that has successfully resisted decades worth of attempts to rein in its hostility?...However, engaging in any kind of cyber tit-for-tat with North Korea could undermine trust in the security of online banking and shopping services,
North_Korea  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  Sony  retaliation  sanctions  blacklists  economic_warfare  money_laundering  hackers  punitive  retribution  undermining_of_trust  cyberattacks 
december 2014 by jerryking
Holman Jenkins: Sony vs. North Korea - WSJ
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Dec. 9, 2014

In the cyberwar that’s coming, firewalls and antivirus software won’t be sufficient. Companies need business models that are robust against cyberattack. Sony’s isn’t, quite apart from the usual complaints now pouring forth from employees about poor workaday data security. (Excel files containing salary data apparently weren’t even password-protected.)
North_Korea  Sony  cyber_security  data_breaches  cyber_warfare  cyberattacks 
december 2014 by jerryking
The Data Companies Wish They Had About Customers - WSJ
March 23, 2014 | WSJ | by Max Taves.

We asked companies what data they wish they had—and how they would use it. Here's what they said....
(A) Dining----Graze.com has a huge appetite for data. Every hour, the mail-order snack business digests 15,000 user ratings about its foods, which it uses to better understand what its customers like or dislike and to predict what else they might like to try...more data could help him understand customers' tastes even better. Among the information he wants most is data about customers' dietary habits, such as what they buy at grocery stores, as well as better information about what they look at on Graze's own site. And because the dietary needs of children change rapidly, he'd like to know if his customers have children and, if so, their ages.
(B) Energy-----Energy consumption is among its customers' main concerns, says CEO William Lynch. For instance, the company offers a product giving homeowners the real-time ability to see things like how many kilowatts it takes to heat the hot tub in Jan. Because of privacy concerns, Savant doesn't collect homeowners' energy data. But if the company knew more about customers' energy use, it could help create customized plans to conserve energy. "We could make recommendations on how to set up your thermostat to save a lot of money,
(C) Banking-----the Bank of the West would like "predictive life-event data" about its customers—like graduation, vacation or retirement plans—to create products more relevant to their financial needs...At this point, collecting that breadth of data is a logistical and regulatory challenge, requiring very different sources both inside and outside the bank.
(D) Appliances-----Whirlpool Corp.has a vast reach in American households—but wants to know more about its customers and how they actually use its products. Real-time use data could not only help shape the future designs of Whirlpool products, but also help the company predict when they're likely to fail.
(E) Healthcare----Explorys creates software for health-care companies to store, access and make sense of their data. It holds a huge trove of clinical, financial and operational information—but would like access to data about patients at home, such as their current blood-sugar and oxygen levels, weight, heart rates and respiratory health. Having access to that information could help providers predict things like hospitalizations, missed appointments and readmissions and proactively reach out to patients,
(F) Healthcare----By analyzing patient data, Carolinas HealthCare System of Charlotte, N.C., can predict readmission rates with 80% accuracy,
(G) Law----law firms that specialize in defense work are typically reactive, however some are working towards becoming more proactive, coveting an ability to predict lawsuits—and prevent them.How? By analyzing reams of contracts and looking for common traits and language that often lead to problems.
(H) Defense---BAE Systems PLC invests heavily in protecting itself from cyberattacks. But it says better data from its suppliers could help improve its defenses...if its suppliers get cyberattacked, its own h/w and s/w could be compromised. But "those suppliers are smaller businesses with lesser investments in their security," ...A lack of trust among suppliers, even those that aren't direct competitors, means only a small percentage of them disclose the data showing the cyberattacks on their systems. Sharing that data, he says, would strengthen the security of every product BAE makes. [BAE is expressing recognition of its vulnerability to network risk].
data  data_driven  massive_data_sets  Graze  banking  cyber_security  BAE  law_firms  Whirlpool  genomics  social_data  appliances  sense-making  predictive_analytics  dark_data  insights  customer_insights  real-time  design  failure  cyberattacks  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  network_risk  shifting_tastes  self-protection  distrust  supply_chains 
november 2014 by jerryking
China Hacking Is Deep and Diverse, Experts Say - WSJ
May 29, 2014 | WSJ | By DANNY YADRON in San Francisco, JAMES T. AREDDY in Shanghai and PAUL MOZUR in Beijing CONNECT
China  hackers  cyber_warfare  cyberattacks  cyber_security 
august 2014 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: China’s cyberespionage presents a 21st-century challenge -
May 22, 2014 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria.
...Vladimir Putin might be a 19th-century statesman, using old-fashioned muscle to get his way, but it has become clear that Chinese President Xi Jinping goes one step further, comfortably embracing both 19th- and 21st-century tactics....it’s also worth studying Xi’s speech in Shanghai, given the same day the deal was struck. The meeting was a gathering of an obscure Asian regional group, one that includes Turkey, Iran and Russia but not the United States. His message was that Asians should take care of their own security. ...

...Cyberattacks are part of a new, messy, chaotic world, fueled by globalization and the information revolution. In a wired, networked world, it is much harder to shut down activity that blurs the lines between governments and private citizens, national and international realms, theft and warfare. And it certainly will not be possible to do so using traditional mechanisms of national security. Notice that Washington is using a legal mechanism (which will be ineffective and largely symbolic) for what is really a national security issue.

The Sino-Russian gas deal reminds us that traditional geopolitics is alive and well. Washington knows how to work its way in that world with its own alliances and initiatives. But cyberespionage represents a new frontier, and no one really has the ideas, tools or strategies to properly address this challenge.
Fareed_Zakaria  challenges  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  espionage  Vladimir_Putin  Russia  China  geopolitics  security_&_intelligence  natural_gas  21st._century  industrial_espionage  petro-politics  realpolitik  Asia  Xi_Jinping  statesmen  cyberattacks  cyberespionage 
may 2014 by jerryking
Cyberattacks to threat to U.S., intelligence chief says - Google Drive
March 13,2013 | NYT | Mark Mazzetti and Scott Shane.

"The nation’s top intelligence official warned Congress on Tuesday that a cyberattack could cripple America’s infrastructure and economy and suggested that such attacks pose the most dangerous immediate threat to the United States, more pressing than an attack by global terrorist networks. James R. Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence, said in prepared testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee that American spy agencies saw only a 'remote chance' in the next two years of a major cyberattack — what he defined as an operation that 'would result in long-term, wide-scale disruption of services, such as a regional power outage.' Still, it was the first time that Mr. Clapper has listed cyberattacks first in his annual presentation to Congress about the various threats facing the United States, and the rare occasion since 2001 that intelligence officials have not listed international terrorism first in the catalog of dangers facing the United States."
cyber_warfare  China  Iran  security_&_intelligence  spymasters  infrastructure  power_grid  vulnerabilities  James_Clapper  cyberattacks  cyberthreats 
march 2013 by jerryking
Business continuity: Making it through the storm
Nov 10th 2012 | The Economist |Anonymous.

Hurricane Sandy was another test of how well businesses can keep going when disaster strikes...GOLDMAN SACHS’S latest shrewd investment was in sandbags and back-up electricity generators. As Hurricane Sandy approached New York, the bags were stacked around its headquarters. It was one of the few offices in downtown Manhattan to remain dry and well-illuminated as “Frankenstorm” battered the city.

Meanwhile, a block farther down West Street, the headquarters of Verizon were awash with salty flood water, soaking cables delivering phone and internet services to millions of customers. The firm was able to reroute much of the traffic through other parts of its network, but local service was disrupted....Sandy is the latest catastrophic event to test the readiness of the world’s leading firms to cope with disaster. Most firms have improved “business continuity” preparations over the years. The Y2K scare at the turn of the century moved IT risk high up the list of worries. The attacks of September 11th 2001 warned firms of the danger of putting all their computers (and staff) in the same place (jk: concentration risk; SPOF)....“Firms are increasingly reliant on networks, but often fail to understand the risks that networks bring,” says Don Tapscott, a management guru. Global supply chains, just-in-time and shifting to the “cloud” tend to bind once unrelated activities ever closer together, making them more prone to failing at the same time. The current fad for moving data to the “cloud” may appear to reduce risk because there is so much spare capacity in the web. Yet some firms offering cloud services have more concentrated operations than (jk: concentration risk).

Firms are starting to recognise their vulnerability to cyber-attack, but few have much idea what they would do if it happened. Mr Tapscott thinks boards should have a committee explicitly focused on understanding IT and network risks and ensuring they are properly managed....Dutch Leonard, a risk expert at Harvard Business School, says that the best-prepared firms use a combination of planning for specific events and planning to cope with specific consequences, such as a loss of a building or supplier, regardless of the cause. He also recommends copying an approach used by the armed forces: using a group of insiders to figure out how the firm could be brought down [ jk: white hats]....Firms should make lobbying government to invest heavily in upgrading that infrastructure a core part of their risk-management strategy, argues Irwin Redlener of the National Centre for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University.

Goldman Sachs has long been a leader in disaster planning because it understands that the situations in which it might not be able to function are exactly the sort of events when very large changes in the value of its investments could occur, says Mr Leonard. Yet too many firms underinvest in planning for disaster because they don’t think it will pay, at least within the short-term timeline by which many now operate, reckons Yossi Sheffi of MIT.
beforemath  boards_&_directors_&_governance  business-continuity  catastrophes  compounded  concentration_risk  crisis  cyberattacks  cyber_security  disasters  disaster_preparedness  Don_Tapscott  Goldman_Sachs  Hurricane_Sandy  isolation  natural_calamities  networks  network_risk  New_York_City  optimism_bias  preparation  readiness  red_teams  resilience  risks  risk-management  short-term  SPOF  step_change  supply_chains  surprises  underinvestments  valuations  vulnerabilities  white_hats 
november 2012 by jerryking
Barack Obama: Taking the Cyberattack Threat Seriously - WSJ.com
July 19, 2012 | WSJ| Barack Obama

In a future conflict, an adversary unable to match our military supremacy on the battlefield might seek to exploit our computer vulnerabilities here at home.
adversaries  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  Obama  simulations  vulnerabilities  asymmetrical  cyberattacks 
july 2012 by jerryking
Pentagon: Online Cyber Attacks Can Count as Acts of War - WSJ.com
MAY 31, 2011 | WSJ |By SIOBHAN GORMAN And JULIAN E. BARNES
Cyber Combat: Act of War
Pentagon Sets Stage for U.S. to Respond to Computer Sabotage With Military Force
cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Pentagon  policymaking  cyberattacks  offensive_tactics 
may 2011 by jerryking
Mortimer Zuckerman: How to Fight and Win the Cyberwar - WSJ.com
* DECEMBER 6, 2010

How to Fight and Win the Cyberwar
We should think of cyberattacks as guided missiles and respond similarly—intercept them and retaliate.
Mort_Zuckerman  cyber_warfare  malware  cyberattacks 
december 2010 by jerryking
U.K. Warns of Cyber Crime Risk - WSJ.com
OCT. 12, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By STEPHEN FIDLER. U.K.
Seeks Private Industry Help in Averting Cyber Attacks
The head of Britain's communications intelligence agency, GCHQ , said
that it may need to receive direct feeds of information from private
companies in key economic sectors in order to better protect the U.K.
economy from the threat from cyber attacks...New approaches may be
needed to deal with attacks on Britain's critical national
infrastructure—industries such as gas, electricity supply and banking
networks. "We need to consider the value of receiving in return a direct
feed of information from the operators with that same sort of
timeliness so that we are aware of the attacks that they are seeing on
their systems as they happen." This points to a different sort of
partnership between the national security agencies and key
industries--systems that are more interconnected and new financial
models to underpin a national capability which is both public and
private,"
cyberattacks  United_Kingdom  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  security_&_intelligence  GCHQ  organized_crime  infrastructure  vulnerabilities  real-time  network_risk  interconnections  power_grid 
october 2010 by jerryking
Battling the Cyber Warmongers
MAY 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By EVGENY MOROZOV.
Cyberattacks are inevitable but the threat has been exaggerated by those
with a vested interest
cyber_warfare  cyber_security  security_&_intelligence  cyberattacks 
may 2010 by jerryking
Brin Drove Google to Pull Back in China - WSJ.com
MARCH 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by JESSICA E.
VASCELLARO. Google Inc. co-founder Sergey Brin pushed the Internet
giant to take the risky step of abandoning its China-based search engine
as that country's efforts to censor the Web and suppress dissidents
smacked of the "totalitarianism" of his youth in the Soviet Union.

In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Brin, who came to the
U.S. from Russia at the age of 6 in 1979, said the compromises to do
business in the world's largest Internet market had become too great.
Finally, a cyberattack that the company traced to Chinese hackers, which
stole some of Google's proprietary computer code and attempted to spy
on Chinese activists' emails, was the "straw that broke the camel's
back."
Google  Sergey_Brin  China  censorship  exits  cyberattacks 
march 2010 by jerryking

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