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jerryking : deadlifts   21

3 strength standards for men
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The exercise: Barbell back squat
Average joe: 1.5x bodyweight
Above average: 1.75x bodyweight
Superhero: 2.5x bodyweight

Boost your numbers: If you’re falling short on strength, try adding box squats to your routine. They help build explosiveness in your lower body and allow you to lift more weight when you head back to traditional back squats. Also, focus on putting squats into your program 2-3 times a week, but only go heavy 1-2 times. Keep the other days lighter and focus on form.
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The exercise: Barbell deadlift
Average joe: 1.5x bodyweight
Above average: 2x bodyweight
Superhero: 2.75x bodyweight

Boost your numbers: try working on form. Most guys stand too far back from the bar and limit themselves from the get-go. Have your form on point? Try mixing in rack pulls where the bar is set at shin height. Having a shorter distance to go allows the lifter to load on more weight and boost strength.
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The exercise: Barbell bench press
Average joe: 1x bodyweight
Above average: 1.5x bodyweight
Superhero: 2x bodyweight

Boost your numbers: think about getting away from traditional bench pressing for a few weeks and substituting with floor pressing. Similar to the box squat, floor presses will help you develop explosive power in your upper body, and strengthen your triceps and accessory muscle groups. Also, don’t forget that overall shoulder strength and balance are important for increasing your bench. Don’t neglect pulling movements, including heavy rows and pullups.
bench_press  chest  deadlifts  legs  standards  strength_training  squats 
november 2019 by jerryking
The Official Pull-Up Checklist (AVOID MISTAKES!) - YouTube
Prerequisite list: Things that can enhance ability to do a pull-up
(1) Strong abdominals. Hang from a bar with absolute stillness. Do more hanging ab exercises.
(2) Strong deadlifts. Stronger you are at "pulling" the better you're going to be on the pull-up.
(3) Strong scapular strength. Need to be strong and stable. Straight arm scapular strength.
(4) Body fat has to be in check. Good strength-to-bodyweight ratio. Get body fat down.

The Set-up
(1) How we grab the bar. Narrow? Shoulder width? Wide grip? Go for slightly wider than shoulder width. Place shoulders in the right position. Gets elbows out in front of the body. Puts stretch on to the lats.
(2) Depth of the grip. Far end of fingers? Deep in the palm? You can do more pull-ups if you grip if you use a hook grip, but you're inviting long-term problems.
(3) Positioning of your legs matters! Keep legs together, pointing toes down towards the ground, and straight out in FRONT of you. Plug the energy leaks (i.e. actively engage your calves, squeeze quads and straighten your knees, squeeze glutes behind you, tighten your abs, ) !!! All these things plug potential places where the force that you're going to generate down to the bar can leak out of. You're whole body is one kinetic chain, with the energy flowing up and down.

The Actual Rep
(1) Look up. Look right at the bar. Get the bar to your chin, preferably to your sternum.
(2) Initiate. Squeeze the bar. Not just through the entire hand. Focus on the ring finger and your pinky finger. Those are the two weakest fingers in your grip. If you can master the weakest fingers, brings the rest of the group along for the ride.
(3) Mindset. Pull the bar down to your body! Attack the bar with your chest. Reach for it with your chest. Open your chest up. Establish thoracic extension. Make exercise easier AND Increase the safety of exercise when it comes to your shoulder.

Caveat: Potential Impact on Shoulder
Do you need to go full out dead hang on every pull up rep. Yes, straighten the elbows on every rep. DO NOT UNPACK YOUR SHOULDERS. Dead hang does NOT mean unpacked shoulders (destabilized shoulders)!!! Don't allow your traps to ride up near your ears. Pull your traps down.....Don't think that getting completely lax at the bottom of the pull-up is a good thing. Get straight at the elbows, keep the tightness there, keep the stability, and then allow that extension through the thoracic spine to still allow for the movement require to execute the pull-up properly, every single time
abdominals  AthleanX  checklists  deadlifts  glutes  mindsets  mistakes  pull-ups  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Letter of Recommendation: Deadlifting
Sept. 3, 2019 |The New York Times | By Bindu Bansinath.

Here was a functional lift with straightforward rules. You set up behind the bar in a hip-width stance, toes pointing forward, hands gripped comfortably around the iron. Keeping a neutral spine, you hinge at the hips, the fulcrum between load and effort, and push the floor away with your legs. You finish standing upright, with your knees locked out and the barbell at mid-thigh. When all goes smoothly, everything has the illusion of happening at once: the metallic clatter of slack as you pull, your hips and chest rising in sync, an impossible load stood all the way up.
CrossFit  deadlifts  functional_strength  gyms  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Returning to your primal state | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
The BIG five compound movements are squats, deadlifts, bench presses, barbell rows and overhead barbell presses.

* Why are compound movements important?
Compound movements are any exercise that engages two or more different joints, therefore impacting multiple muscles during the same exercise. They improve overall fitness by benefitting the key categories: cardiovascular health, strength and flexibility.

* More burn
Compound movements burn more calories than an isolation exercise. As you build more muscle, your basal metabolic rate (the rate at which you burn calories when at rest) goes up. While doing compound movements, your body expends about five calories of energy to consume one litre of oxygen. That means that an exercise involving more muscle tissue, such as compound movements, requires more oxygen and that helps burn more calories.

* Benefits of each compound movement
SQUAT
Squats activate the muscles all over the upper and lower body. They are a relatively easy movement to learn, but there are varieties and progressions that offer challenges on the way to mastering them.Physical benefits:
Enhance the mobility in the hips and ankles
Challenge your core stabilizers, posterior chain and lower leg
Correct muscle imbalances
Life benefits:
Ease movements such as bending down to lift boxes, working in the garden, trying on shoes at the mall or picking up after a dog during a walk
DEADLIFT
Deadlifts target lats, glutes, hamstrings and core stabilizers, but also work your entire body. They are a great exercise for stabilizing the posterior chain, which is the group of muscles through your whole back.Physical benefits:
Improve overall speed, power and athleticism
Help create a nice shape, especially the butt and legs
Life benefits:
Help when you're doing movements such as picking up heavy boxes or lifting kids
BENCH PRESS
Bench presses are the most effective exercise to gain upper-body strength and mass.Physical benefits:
Increase overall upper-body strength
Improve cardiovascular function
Life benefits:
Anything that requires pushing, whether that's pushing a stroller or a lawnmower or attempting power-sled exercises in the gym
BARBELL ROW
This is one of the key exercises that carries over to the other big lifts. If you do it well, you'll improve all the other compound movements.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the back
Reinforces proper hip function
Life benefits:
Improves posture
Helps undo some of the damage of sitting every day
OVERHEAD BARBELL PRESS
While the overhead barbell press strengthens the upper body, particularly shoulder muscles, it also gives your stabilizers a workout as you maintain proper form.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the rotator cuff, which helps people who are internally rotated
Reduces the risk of shoulder injuries
Life benefits:
Eases the impact of constantly looking down at cellphones
Improves posture
You can start off with bodyweight, rather than weights..... air squat can still deliver a workout. You can also just use the bar without weights. .....Perfecting the movements helps ward off injury when you do load on some weight. Once you’re comfortable with the movements, put together a periodized plan (ask a GoodLife professional about a 5x5 program to get you started). You’ll soon see and feel the benefits of more strength, increased energy, better posture and higher fat burn.
chest  deadlifts  Goodlife  metabolic_rate  strength_training  squats  fitness  glutes  military_press  compound_movements  functional_strength  core_stability 
august 2019 by jerryking
The 6 Best Lifts for NEW Muscle Growth (GUARANTEED!) - YouTube
(1) Deadlifts >>> (a) chest-supported row (T-Bar row); (b) Reverse dumbbell lunge or forward dumbbell lunge. Teaches you how to push hard through that forward leg to get all momentum of your body back up to a standing position. How to push with great force through your legs, one at a time, into the ground. Then go back to deadlifting with both feet.

(2) Squats >>> (value of the glutes when it comes to performing the squat. Don't half rep it. Activate the glutes to help with the bottom of the lift, but you have to get deep enough. A variation of the glute hamstring raise. Initiate the contraction by squeezing your butt cheeks together. Hip flextion.

(3) Overhead Press. Z press. Sit down on the ground, and overhead press from that position.

(4) Weighted Pull-ups. Work on stability of the shoulder blade.
AthleanX  breakthroughs  deadlifts  fitness  glutes  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
The shoes you work out in are affecting your health and performance
May 13, 2109 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL LANDINI.

* KICKING IT OLD SCHOOL - Classic skate shoes such as Vans, Airwalks, Chuck Taylors and Converse are perfect for lifting.
* KICKING IT SUPER OLD SCHOOL - lose the shoes all together, at least on lower-body exercises (you can keep your socks on if you’d like).
* TAKING IT TO THE NEW SCHOOL - Nike’s Metcon Trainers (supposedly a bit narrow for those with wide feet) and Reebok’s Crossfit NANO 8.0 bleu line (preferred training shoe for running,)are designed specifically for weight-room workouts.
* If seeking a second skin for your feet, the New Balance Minimus and the Xero Prio (my personal favourite).
* Metcon Flyknit if you run in addition to lifting, they're a bit more flexible
* a good place to start is by reaching for a low-support, low-heeled shoe, like the Reebok Nano, Nike Metcon, Under Armour TriBase Reign, or Altra HIIT XT, to get that close-to-ground feel. “The less of a heel, the better,”

If, however, you care about things such as lifting in a pain-free manner and increasing your quality of movement in general, you need to pay more attention to your choices in weight-room footwear.

Whether you’re squatting a barbell, throwing a punch or swinging a baseball bat, the force behind these movements comes from the ground up, channelled through the body via the feet. This is why I shudder every time I see someone bench-press with their legs casually extended, or worse, with their feet elevated off the floor. Even though it’s ostensibly an upper-body exercise, your legs play an important role in bench-pressing. If all you’re relying on is your arms and chest to move that weight, you’re limiting your potential progress and putting yourself at risk of an injury.........soft, wedge-heeled support is the exact opposite of what you want in a lifting shoe. In fact, everything that makes running shoes suitable for the road is what makes them awful for lifting. Let’s say you’re about to deadlift. How are you supposed to push through the floor with maximum force if you’re standing on two inches of cushy foam? You’ll never get the barbell off the floor with enough speed to allow for a max-effort lift.

The same principle applies to squats; however, here, the consequences are more dire. Most non-lifting shoes have thick heels that slope down to the floor. This shifts your weight forward, to the toes. The deeper you sink into that squat, the more your weight shifts forward. Add a barbell to this mix and it won’t be long until you’re one of those poor misguided souls who says squatting is bad for your knees, when really it’s your beat-up Brooks that are to blame.

So what, then, should we wear on our feet when lifting weights? This is one of the few easy answers in this business, and thankfully the solutions don’t have to cost a whole lot. Generally speaking, you want a shoe that offers a wide toe box and a flat, flexible sole that sticks to the floor. Some arch support is fine and may even be necessary, but the less structure to the shoe the better. Remember those hundred-plus moving parts in each of your feet? They need training, too! If they’re constantly being supported by artificial means, they’ll never get stronger.
deadlifts  fitness  footwear  movement-based  shoes  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
6 GREATEST EXERCISES (Old School Edition!!) - YouTube
* Plug energy leaks in your pull-ups. Tighten core, tight legs, buttocks, point feet down and away from the chest down.
* Bench press--keep grips shoulder width, don't go out wide. Focus on adduction across the front of your body towards midline.
* Deadlifts--master the hip hinge. Bar and the knees.
* Barbell curl--cheat the rep on the start. When it gets to vertical, stop cheats. SLOW down the eccentric.
AthleanX  bench_press  biceps  chest  deadlifts  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training  old_school 
february 2019 by jerryking
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  calisthenics  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  face-pulls  fitness  functional_strength  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Common Advice for Those With Thinning Bones Could Be All Wrong - WSJ
Bone building happens specifically at the areas of the bone you stress during your workout, says Pamela S. Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, at the University of Missouri, in Columbia.

For this reason, a dead lift is one of the best exercises because it “uses big muscles around the hips and hamstrings,” causing the muscle to pull on the bone. It also recruits the muscles around the lumbar and thoracic spine to stabilize the body during the lift, says Polly de Mille, exercise physiologist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Proper form is critical to safety, she adds.
aging  longevity  strength_training  intensity  fitness  exercise  high-intensity  trauma  overcompensation  deadlifts  osteoporosis  bone_density  high-impact 
april 2018 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  metabolic_rate  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
3 Ways To Build A Better Mind-Muscle Connection
Todd Bumgardner
July 20, 2016

1. Cueing Mantras

The meditative "om" is often misunderstood, but it's been used for centuries for a reason: It works. This simple, one-syllable utterance cuts away the outside world and gives a meditator the means to travel inward. We can use the same process to improve our exercise performance and focus.

The means are simple, and what I like to call "three-letter self-cueing mantras." Think about the most impactful tasks a lift requires: getting into the starting position, finding a good middle position, and performing the lift forcefully. Let's use the deadlift as the example.

You want to start, and finish the lift, tall and tight. You have to reach into a good bottom position before lifting, and you have to drive the floor away for a solid lift. The deadlift mantra, then, is TRD: Tall and Tight. Reach. Drive.
deadlifts  exercise  fitness  gyms  mantras  mindfulness  self-talk  strength_training 
june 2017 by jerryking

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