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jerryking : deaths   34

Opinion | Luke Perry Had a Stroke and Died. I Had One and Lived.
March 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Contributing Opinion Writer.

Kara Swisher was 49 years old, healthy and had none of the conditions--symptoms--like high blood pressure that might predict a stroke...yet she had one after arriving in Hong Kong after a long flight...not hydrating or walking around enough on the long flight to Hong Kong, created what the doctor, who immediately started the treatment of anticoagulant drugs and others, called a “hole in one.”.....The idea of death — the absolute nearness of it — has been ever-present for Kara Swisher. Since her dad died, she's lived her life as if she had no time at all or very little, making the kinds of choices of someone who knew that tomorrow might indeed be her last.

[Stanford University in 2005 by the Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs:

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.]

.....Sometimes {Steve Jobs'] urgency manifested itself in inspiration, sometimes in meanness, sometimes in humor, sometimes in seriousness. But it was always urgent.......[recast in my words...I have both the privilege to live more days on earth and the awareness that those days are limited.

Be tough-minded going forward--Basically, I don’t have the time to be so careless in what I do and I don’t have the time to not to ask the same of you.].........You get this kind of nudge again and again from death. It is, as the Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski noted, “a secret teacher hiding in plain sight.” Luke Perry’s death was yet another lesson from that teacher. ....... Mr. Perry’s Dylan McKay, who was given to saying things like, “The only person you can trust in this world is yourself.”
'90s  actors  hydration  Kara_Swisher  Luke_Perry  midlife  mini-stroke  mybestlife  op-ed  tips  speeches  Stanford  Steve_Jobs  strokes  symptoms  television  travel  It's_up_to_me  urgency  long-haul  deaths 
march 2019 by jerryking
Twilight of the Rock Gods -
March 25, 2017 | WSJ | By Neil Shah.

As rock ‘n’ roll loses its founding megastars—and sales juggernauts—the music industry faces pressure to revamp.....As rock's founding fathers and mothers get older, the music industry faces a problem: can younger artists replace their sales?

Of the 25 artists with the highest record sales in the U.S. since 1991, when reliable data first became available, just one—Britney Spears—is under 40, Nielsen data show. Nineteen of the 25 are over 50 years old.....In terms of concert-tour revenue, artists over 50 represent half of the $4.5 billion generated by last year’s top 100-grossing tours, excluding non-music acts and comedians, according to a WSJ analysis of data from Pollstar, the trade magazine. Of the top 10, five were over 50, including Bruce Springsteen (67), Guns N’ Roses (average age 53), Paul McCartney (74), Garth Brooks (55) and the Rolling Stones (73), Pollstar data show.......the number of celebrity deaths last year wasn’t exceptional, according to a study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, though the number of “mega famous” celebrity deaths was. Because of their penchant for hard living, rocker deaths are likely to stay consistently high. .....Rock has an outsize influence on music sales. It was responsible for 41% of total U.S. album sales last year, far higher than hip-hop and R&B (15%), country (13%) or pop (10%), according to Nielsen......Much of rock’s commercial success was possible because of the way the industry was structured. By the 1980s, cash-rich major labels were helping finance tours, throwing money at fledgling acts and investing huge sums in veteran stars even when their careers floundered.

Such investments—equivalent in spirit to the R&D expenditures of pharmaceutical firms—helped artists build enduring brands and transformed superstars into major corporations that overshadow young pop/rock acts even today.......WILL YOUNGER STARS FILL THE VOID?

Probably not. Because of the multiplicity of entertainment options today, reduced attention spans, personalized tastes and less record-label support, most of today’s artists will never be as big as yesterday’s rockers.

Radio used to have the power to make even a lower-quality rock release popular. However, the fragmentation of the music industry—fans using multiple formats and splintering across rock, hip-hop, country and electronic music—means most acts will never find the same big audiences......WHAT ABOUT CONCERTS?

Young megastars like Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and country acts like Carrie Underwood make most of their money on tour. And there will be a successive generation of touring veterans like Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake and Nicki Minaj, along with unexpected reunions and area headliners.

But many acts today from rapper Future to rockers Japandroids don’t generate colossal sums compared with older stars.......WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

The concert business is going in two directions: diversifying into festivals and smaller venues, to focus on younger audiences, while continuing to squeeze every opportunity out of the boomer market.

Joe Edwards, a St. Louis music-venue owner, sees the industry shifting focus from big venues such as amphitheaters to the smaller 1,000 to 3,000-seat venues suited to today’s artists. “I see more acts loving those sizes,” he says, since the artists don’t have to wait to play bigger stages. “Smaller venues will be very popular,” he says.

To reach younger audiences, Live Nation, the country’s biggest concert promoter, has been on a music-festival-buying spree. Last spring, the company bought a majority stake in Founders Entertainment, which runs New York’s Governors Ball festival, part of a strategy that diversifies its business away from the 40-plus amphitheaters it runs.
aging  artists  attention_spans  celebrities  concerts  deaths  golden_oldies  legacy_artists  Live_Nation  live_performances  music  music_industry  music_festivals  music_venues  rock-'n'-roll  small_formats  small_spaces  superstars  touring 
march 2017 by jerryking
Looking Death in the Face -
DEC. 26, 2016 | The New York Times | by John Kaag and Clancy Martin.

Shelley’s poem, “Ozymandias,”, tells us, nothing remains of this pharaoh's works or of him, despite his status as the king of kings. All that remains is sand.

The poem’s message is perennial: All of this will be over soon, faster than you think. Fame has a shadow — inevitable decline. The year 2016 has delivered a string of deaths that serve as bracing reminders of this inevitability: Prince, Nancy Reagan, David Bowie, Elie Wiesel, Bill Cunningham, Muhammad Ali, Gordie Howe, Merle Haggard, Patty Duke, John Glenn....The year’s end is a time to take account of kingdoms built, but also the sheer rapidity of their destruction. It is a chance to come to terms with the existential fragility that is overlooked in most of our waking hours and that must be faced even by the greatest among us....the scariest thing about death: coming to die only to discover, in Thoreau’s words, that we haven’t lived....Dying, of course, corresponds exactly with what we prefer to call living. This is what Samuel Beckett meant when he observed that we “give birth astride the grave.” It is an existential realization that may seem to be the province of the very sick or very old. The elderly get to watch the young and oblivious squander their days, time that they now recognize as incredibly precious....The trick to dying for something is picking the right something, day after week after precious year. And this is incredibly hard and decidedly not inevitable....
dying  howto  Egyptian_Empire  history  worthiness  discernment  overlooked  perennial  timeless  poems  decline  mybestlife  deaths 
december 2016 by jerryking
Vigil held for daughter of Conservative Party president - The Globe and Mail
JOSH WINGROVE AND SEAN TEPPER
Ottawa and Toronto — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 17 2014,

Stuff that won't show up in 311 tables. Toornto Life series of maps. Let's ask for those of the past year. Ask for underlying dataset.
311  Leaside  Toronto  deaths  Conservative_Party 
september 2014 by jerryking
The Six Million Person Question
October 4, 2006 | WSJ |pg A 14 | by Mark Bowden
It is a tricky business, rating the moral depredations of the human species. because just when you have settled on the worst, somebody somewhere achieves a new low....The Holocaust haunts us more than those others for a good reason. The Final Solution was the deliberate act of a government to exterminate a portion of its own people. It employed the resources of the state—its policy makers, planners, intellectuals, legal system, police and military, industry. transportation system and to a large extent its people—lo single out a particular group of citizens. systematically demonize and isolate them. and then count them, label them, strip them of everything, round them up, ship them to concentration camps, kill them and incinerate them. It attempted to squeeze some last value out of the most fit among those doomed, by employing them as slave labor or subjecting them to medical experimentation before killing them, and even then looked for ways to make saleable products out of their remains. This horror began in peacetime, so the nation was not lashing out in sell-defense. nor was it being threatened in any concrete way...The Holocaust disturbs us so deeply because it demonstrates that none of the things we associate the of civilization-peace. prosperity, industrialization, education, technological achievement-free us from the dark side of the human soul. Just as there is evil in the heart of every man. there is evil at the heart of even the most "civilized" human society. It is a humbling recognition. Man and society are both capable of the most appallingly depraved behavior. Only in the case of society, it on an industrial scale.
The lives lost in the firebombing of Dresden or the nuclear flash over Hiroshima are no less significant, and the military choices that brought about those deaths remain profoundly disturbing. but they at least took place In the context of war. Whole societies were caught up In a life-or-death struggle.
What the Holocaust demonstrates is the danger of a state. It shows what can happen when a group of true believers. convinced of the superiority of their own ideas, have unchecked power. They are then free to rewrite history lo suit their political ends. and crush those who disagree or pretest . . . or who worship God in a different way.
Like. say. the mullahs in Iran.
the_Holocaust  Ahmadinejad  deaths  moral_equivalencies  WWII  dark_side 
july 2012 by jerryking
Stephens: A Lesson Before Dying - WSJ.com
December 13, 2011 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS.

A Lesson Before Dying
To bemoan illness after a good life seemed ungrateful.

"The good death has increasingly become a myth," wrote the Yale surgeon and bioethicist Sherwin Nuland in his 1993 prize-winning book "How We Die." Dying, in Dr. Nuland's eloquent telling, amounts to "a series of destructive events that involve by their very nature the disintegration of the dying person's humanity." Who can—who would dare—judge a man's worth when his mind and body are being picked bare by disease?...Cancer is a heist culminating in murder....To grow up is to understand that the confidence a parent radiates around his children is rarely the confidence the parent feels. I knew my father well enough to know his various fears and insecurities...All this meant that the diagnosis should have been devastating to him. Yet he never betrayed the slightest sign of fear...Yet my father maintained his usual sangfroid even when it became clear that there would be no getting well. There were no five stages of grief, no bouts of denial, anger, bargaining and depression....Throughout his life my father taught me many lessons: about language, history and philosophy; about ethics, loyalty and love. In the end, he taught me that death cannot destroy the dignity of a dignified man.

Charles J. Stephens, 1937-2011. May his memory be for a blessing.
dying  deaths  hospice  lessons_learned  cancers  Bret_Stephens  fatherhood  grief  palliative_care  end-of-life  books  dignity 
april 2012 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: Breaking the Kim Dynasty - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011| WSJ | Editorial.

Moments of transition are also when a syndicate like the one that rules North Korea may face internal leadership disputes. It's possible that as the Kim gene pool gets shallower, the young Kim may not be able to maintain control the way his father and grandfather did. The West can exploit this tension by staying united in isolating the regime until it changes.

The wrong approach is to believe the regime will change with another round of cash and other carrots. In recent days Washington and Seoul have been tempting the North back to the six-party talks on denuclearization with offers of humanitarian food aid. But the lesson of the past 20 years is that this helps the regime by giving it currency or other aid to pay off its members and by enhancing its international stature.

The Clinton Administration tried and failed with its Agreed Framework of 1994, and the Bush Administration tried and failed in its second term with Condoleezza Rice's ploy to remove North Korea from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terror. North Korea pocketed everything, lied about dismantling its nuclear plans, and kept on proliferating. A replay might enhance Kim Jong Eun's stature inside the regime.

Dictatorships tend to split when they are under economic and diplomatic pressure
dynasties  editorials  North_Korea  Kim_Jong_Il  gene_pool  deaths  dictatorships  Kim_Jong_Eun  succession  nepotism  transitions 
december 2011 by jerryking
John Bolton: 'The Great Successor' - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011
'The Great Successor'
There's no guarantee that the North Korean military will accept another hereditary ruler.

By JOHN BOLTON
John_Bolton  North_Korea  U.S.  succession  dynasties  op-eds  Kim_Jong_Il  deaths  dictatorships  Kim_Jong_Eun 
december 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
Catherine Sinclair. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18
silence  Toronto  African_Canadians  ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  killings  deaths  racism  murders 
november 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
David Gladstone. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18

For 25 years, I was a principal in the inner city of Toronto and, over all those years, one fact became very clear: Black mothers would not let their children be blamed by a white male authority figure without challenging that authority. A black mother would almost never admit that her child might have been in error in his or her behaviour.

However, I slowly began to understand why. There was no one else around to protect the black mother's child and it made no difference what the child did, the mother was not going to side with white authority against her child. Even when I used black teachers to discuss the issue with the mother, nothing changed.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  silence  teachers  criminality  murders  killings  deaths 
november 2011 by jerryking
Even in the city, it takes a village to raise a child space space
November 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail – Page A21 | By WILLIAM THORSELL

It was wonderful last week to hear a pastor at another Toronto funeral for a young murdered black man demand that dysfunctional families and communities accept responsibility themselves for the trauma. Stop laying most of the blame on others, he said; face the fact that much of the pathology comes from within the home. The mourners in the church applauded. Many people who might try to help these troubled communities defer, waiting for the communities themselves to speak honestly about their own condition. At the core, it is a matter of values
William_Thorsell  Toronto  African_Canadians  funerals  murders  silence  killings  deaths  dysfunction  poverty  family_breakdown  values  face_the_facts 
november 2011 by jerryking
Many in Sub-Saharan Africa Mourn Qaddafi’s Death - NYTimes.com
By JOSH KRON
Published: October 22, 2011
Colonel Qaddafi came to power in 1969 as a 27-year old ideologue, who modeled himself on President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt, and focused his energy on leading a pan-Arab renaissance. But by the turn of the century, feeling spurned by his fellow Arabs, he turned his focus south toward sub-Saharan Africa. He used his own money, as well as state-owned investment firms, to build mosques, hotels and telecommunications companies.

He also meddled in the politics of other African countries — at least a dozen coups or attempted coups on the continent were traced to his support.

One of the many grandiose titles he embraced for himself was “the king of kings of Africa.”

Over time, his efforts won him many African allies, and when the uprising against him began this year, the African Union took months to recognize a rebel council as the country’s governing authority.
Libya  Moammar_Gadhafi  Africa  deaths  mourning  legacies  sub-Saharan_Africa 
october 2011 by jerryking
Making Sure Patients Don’t Die Alone - Well Blog - NYTimes.com
June 3, 2010 |NYT | vy TARA PARKER-POPE. From the
comments..."The prospect of imminent death is probably the most
frightening thing that all human beings must eventually face. And to do that alone is tragic. It is good to know that the medical profession is aware that the care given to patients must not only deal with their medical needs but with
their emotional and spiritual needs as well. Everyone wins. Thank you.
— Maxine Howland"
compassion  deaths  palliative_care  hospice 
june 2010 by jerryking
How We Bury the War Dead - WSJ.com
MAY 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by YOCHI J. DREAZEN and GARY FIELDS
deaths  militaries 
may 2010 by jerryking

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