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jerryking : decision_trees   6

HOW TO SELL FRESH PRODUCE TO SUPERMARKET CHAINS
March 1999 | | Bobby G. Beamer, Adjunct Professor, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech.

The most common approach to penetrating the fresh produce market has been to identify market windows created by seasonal production variations in major production areas. To attract buyers, local producers have attempted to fill market windows left open by established marketing channels. This production
approach to marketing fails to consider the needs of their customers: the retail supermarkets and their buyers.
However, by adopting a marketing approach , growers can establish better long-term relationships with their customers and capture more benefits than merely competing with other producing regions on price. Marketing efforts must begin before production as growers learn about buyers` needs and
requirements, including grade, quality, packaging, and delivery, in addition to learning which individual produce items are needed. The marketing approach, then, requires that growers produce what they can sell rather than trying to sell what they have produced. With the emphasis on variety in the produce section, Virginia growers may find more production opportunities in the specialty item category than by attempting to meet the shortages created by seasonal production
variations.

the average produce department in 1994 occupied 12 percent of the total store space but generated almost 17 percent of the average profits for the store. Previous research (Runyan, et al .) identified the following problems that can hinder the development of a good relationship between buyers and producers:
∑ lack of consistent quality,
∑ uneven sizing and grading,
∑ product too mature,
∑ lack of advance notice of product availability,
∑ inadequate removal of field heat, and
∑ lack of organization among local growers.

CONCLUSIONS
This study confirms the conditions for market entry described by Ryan, et al .: consistent grading for quality, even sizing, proper product maturity; removal of field heat; anticipated arrivals; and grower organizations. Merchandisers stressed the importance of good relationships, stating that new producers would have a hard time penetrating the market because of the loyalty factor established between growers and buyers. Part of this relationship is that ì. . . even at a cheaper price, itís going to be hard to pry us away from [our usual suppliers] because they provide consistent size, color, packing, and delivery. If we call them up and say that weíre short and need another truck load, theyíll have it here for us this
afternoon.îThe existence of these relationships emphasizes the need for the producer to get to know the market.
Rather than trying to compete with existing relationships, producers need to identify commodities having inconsistent supplies or poorly established supply relationships.

During interviews, produce merchandisers consistently expressed doubts about the willingness of small-scale, local produce growers to adopt practices conducive to the establishment of relationships . Although small-scale producers lack the economies of size that enable large-scale producers to invest in equipment and facilities, new institutions, such as the shipping-point markets, may provide small firms with the support needed to establish market relationships. However, such marketing support may be coming at the wrong end of the production process. Traditionally, fruit and vegetable growers, like many people involved in agricultural production, view their role primarily as commodity producers. The primary emphasis is placed on producing a good product, while marketing is viewed as strictly a post-harvest activity. One merchandiser related the story of a new producer who grew several acres of Daikon, a large, hot Japanese radish. The producer was disappointed to discover that after harvesting the crop no one was interested in purchasing it. Such a problem could have been avoided if the grower had invested some time, prior to production, in market research. Unfortunately, many producers still follow this approach in the production and marketing of fresh fruits and vegetables
fresh_produce  supermarkets  grocery  howto  market_windows  statistics  profitability  barriers_to_entry  farming  agriculture  Virginia  decision_trees  WaudWare  OPMA 
april 2013 by jerryking
The Right Way to Ask for a Raise
January 1994 | Working Woman | Stephen M. Pollan and Mark Levine.
In today's cost-conscious environment, chances are you won’t get as big raise as you'd like. But with the right approach, you may be able to boost the one you're given, win other kinds of financial rewards or at least set the stage for a larger increase next time. Your strongest argument: that your salary has not kept pace with your accomplishments or that you are under paid relative to your peers. To better the odds of success, approach your boss only after a positive evaluation or some third-party recognition of your achievements. And don’t hesitate to use flattery.
managing_up  negotiations  compensation  salaries  performance_reviews  decision_making  decision_trees  self-worth 
august 2012 by jerryking
Getting a Better Severance Deal
November 1994 | Working Woman | BY STEPHEN M. POLLAN AND MARK LEVINE.

Severance packages are more negotiable than you may think. Treat them as preliminary offers, not done deals, and use whatever leverage you have. Do not sign a release—or even a statement that you've been terminated—at the initial meeting, when you receive the news. Insist on postponing all decisions to a subsequent meeting with both your direct supervisor and someone from personnel. Say you need the time to digest the news or even that you feel too emotional to continue. Then use this grace period to de1ermine what you really need in tenns of money and other benefits. Draft a memo outlining your dream severance package, listing a reason for each request. And if you suspect that you're being discriminated against—maybe everyone being dismissed is over 40 or female--contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (800-669-4000) or a labor lawyer. When you finally go into your second meeting, try to set aside your hurt and anger. Treat this like any other business negotiation. Be firm but flexible in your requests. and know where to draw your bottom line. Keep in mind that both you and your supervisor want to wrap the matter up as quickly as possible.
litigation  negotiations  decision_making  decision_trees  exits  managing_up  severance 
august 2012 by jerryking
Turning Down an Assignment
May 1994 | Working Woman | Stephen M. Pollack and Mark Levine.

Turning down an unpromising assignment calls for great tact, lest your refusal mark you as lazy. disloyal or uncooperative. To avoid such career-damaging labels. never refuse outright or belittle the project's importance. Instead, ask for time to review the proposal, then wait until you're approached again. “Time is your ally: Your superior's Monday morning inspiration may be forgotten by Wednesday. 3 If not. offer a thoughtful. businesslike reason for refusing the assignment and a collateral suggestion for completing the project. If your boss agrees, reinforce your position in the company by restating your expertise and expressing your willingness to take on future projects. If your boss rejects your proposal. try to spread the potential liability around by requesting that it become a team project. It that's not possible. you have little choice but to accept the assignment despite your qualms. shielding yourself with a memo outlining the obstacles in case the project fails.
Managing_Your_Career  managing_up  decision_making  decision_trees 
august 2012 by jerryking
How to Ace a Tough Interview
July 1994 | Working Woman | Stephen M. Pollan and Mark Levine. How to prepare for a stress interview.
decision_making  interview_preparation  interviews  Managing_Your_Career  howto  decision_trees 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Digitalization of the World - Adam Smith, Esq.
11 January, 2010 | Adam Smith, Esq. | post by Bruce MacEwen.
"Education, as a role for us, should I hope be obvious. We educate our
clients, " and "We don't just rent this knowledge out to our clients, we
should impart it so it becomes their own.
Financial/medical advisers are people to whom we entrust (one hopes) our
every secret, hope, and fear. We should serve the same function. ... We
should be able to provide them with various roadmap's, decision trees,
alternative ways of pursuing their objectives, with lesser and greater
ratios of return and reward. Hands-on personal care? Yes, because there
is no substitute for being there. The more amazing technology and
collaboration-at-a-distance becomes (what the Web, ultimately, is all
about), the more important face to face personal meetings are. The more
people you know "virtually," the more you want to meet them in person."
Bruce_MacEwen  JCK  client_management  inequality_of_information  trustworthiness  knowledge_intensive  management_consulting  indispensable  professional_education  digital_life  teaching  decision_trees  ratios  roadmaps  risk-assessment  strategic_thinking  risks  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  generating_strategic_options  client_development  expertise  digitalization 
january 2010 by jerryking

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