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jerryking : delivery_services   15

How FleetOptic’s data analytics smooth the last mile of a parcel’s journey
SEPTEMBER 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail| by JOANNA PACHNER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

FleetOptics specializes in so-called last-mile delivery, from a retailer's distribution centre to the customer's door—the hardest and most expensive portion, estimated to account for a least 30% of total transportation cost. It's also the most vital as, in the e-commerce era, receiving the package is often the only contact consumers have with a human during the transaction. FleetOptics' software makes the parcel's progress transparent for both business and consumer. Customers can track the driver on-screen as they might an approaching Uber car, avoiding that infuriating experience of the deliveryman arriving just after they jump in the shower. Retailers, meanwhile, can check packages' status in real time through FleetOptics' online portal. As co-founder Vince Buckley pithily sums it up, “Tesla is a battery company that also makes cars. We're a technology company that also makes deliveries.”
analytics  data  data_driven  delivery  delivery_networks  delivery_services  distribution  distribution_centres  e-commerce  FleetOptics  fulfillment  last_mile  logistics  package_delivery  retailers  same-day  start_ups  shipping  third-party  traceability  tracking  trucking  warehouses 
november 2019 by jerryking
America’s Biggest Supermarket Company Struggles With Online Grocery Upheaval
April 21, 2019 | WSJ | By Heather Haddon.

Kroger adjusts operations and invests in technology to hang on to customers who avoid stores; ‘we’ve got to get our butts in gear
Amazon  bricks-and-mortar  BOPIS  CDO  cultural_clash  delivery_services  digital_strategies  disruption  e-commerce  e-grocery  grocery  IBM  Instacart  Jet  Kroger  Microsoft  millennials  Ocado  Oracle  pilot_programs  post-deal_integration  retailers  same-day  Shipt  start_ups  supermarkets  Vitacost  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
april 2019 by jerryking
Want to See What’s Up Amazon’s Sleeve? Take a Tour of Seattle
Sept. 23, 2018 | The New York Times | By Karen Weise.

Amazon uses Seattle as a living laboratory, trying out new retail and logistics models.

Some trials never leave the city. But others, like the use of independent contractors to deliver packages, have found their ways to the rest of the country and abroad. The pilots point to a company, with ambitions that at times can seem boundless, investing deeply in figuring out its physical footprint and how to provide convenience at a lower cost.....In 2015 when Amazon first tested the Treasure Truck, a decorated vehicle that drives around and sells a daily deal like smart watches or plant-based burger patties, it delayed the public debut at least twice before finally going live. .....
Amazon  Amazon_Books  AmazonFresh  Amazon_Go  bookstores  business_models  cashierless  experimentation  new_businesses  Seattle  pilot_programs  product_returns  delivery_services 
september 2018 by jerryking
Amazon encourages entrepreneurs to build logistics network | Financial Times
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Amazon  Amazon_Prime  last_mile  Fedex  UPS  USPS  entrepreneur  logistics  shippers  speed  small_business  e-commerce  delivery  delivery_networks  delivery_times  delivery_services 
june 2018 by jerryking
‘You’re Stupid If You Don’t Get Scared’: When Amazon Goes From Partner to Rival - WSJ
By Jay Greene and Laura Stevens
June 1, 2018

The data weapon
One Amazon weapon is data. In retail, Amazon gathered consumer data to learn what sold well, which helped it create its own branded goods while making tailored sales pitches with its familiar “you may also like” offer. Data helped Amazon know where to start its own delivery services to cut costs, an alternative to using United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp.

“In many ways, Amazon is nothing except a data company,” said James Thomson, a former Amazon manager who advises brands that work with the company. “And they use that data to inform all the decisions they make.”

In web services, data across the broader platform, along with customer requests, inform the company’s decisions to move into new businesses, said former Amazon executives.

That gives Amazon a valuable window into changes in how corporations in the 21st century are using cloud computing to replace their own data centers. Today’s corporations frequently want a one-stop shop for services rather than trying to stitch them together. A food-services firm, say, might want to better track data it collects from its restaurants, so it would rent computing space from Amazon and use a data service offered by a software company on Amazon’s platform to better analyze what customers order. A small business might use an Amazon partner’s online services for password and sign-on functions, along with other business-management programs.
21st._century  Amazon  AWS  brands  cloud_computing  contra-Amazon  coopetition  data  data_centers  data_collection  data_driven  delivery_services  fear  new_businesses  one-stop_shop  partnerships  platforms  private_labels  rivalries  small_business  strengths  tools  unfair_advantages 
june 2018 by jerryking
Amazon forecasts quarterly loss as spending spree shows no signs of abating
JULY 28, 2017 | Financial Times | Leslie Hook.

The Seattle-based tech company is now expanding on all fronts: buying the Whole Foods grocery chain, offering new delivery services around the world and racing to open enough data centres to keep up with demand for its cloud computing business.....

Capital expenditure grew twice as quickly as revenue during the period, spending on servers for cloud computing rose 70 per cent and employee headcount jumped 42 per cent.

The figures suggest Amazon is moving towards a more capital-intensive business model with permanently higher headcount and a much bigger physical footprint. This represents a shift from the more streamlined online sales model that relies on big, efficient warehouses to keep costs as low as possible....Amazon’s hiring jump in the second quarter points to a different but equally important shift: Mr Olsavsky said adding sales staff for the company’s advertising and cloud computing divisions were the key reasons behind the rise in headcount, which increased from 351,000 at the beginning of the quarter to 382,400 at the end.

Amazon has been opening a growing number of bricks-and-mortar stores, including a convenience store and two grocery pick-up points, and its purchase of Whole Foods will add hundreds of US stores virtually overnight.....One of the fastest areas of growth was in third-party logistics, as it provides handling services for an increasing array of merchants who sell goods through Amazon. Revenue from these third-party logistics services rose 38 per cent during the quarter to hit $7bn, representing more than a sixth of Amazon’s sales....The growth in that division, as well as intense competition from rivals Microsoft and Google, has pushed Amazon to spend more than $8bn on servers over the past 12 months.

These two divisions — logistics and Amazon Web Services — are two of the fastest-growing in the company but both will require heavy investment to keep on trend.
Amazon  logistics  capital-intensity  Whole_Foods  hiring  capex  AWS  delivery_services 
august 2017 by jerryking
Fast-Food Chains, Upscale Restaurants Want to Bring You Lunch - WSJ
By Julie Jargon
Updated June 1, 2017

Restaurants are no longer treating lunchtime delivery as an afterthought.

With online-ordering apps proliferating and many customers cutting down on eating out for lunch, the industry—from fast-food chains to upscale restaurateurs—is looking for ways to bring food to patrons without compromising their eating experience.......“Restaurant delivery is a $100 billion dollar market, and it’s exploding,” ......But enticing customers to order in at lunch, which has been a tough spot for burger chains in particular, remains difficult. McDonald’s Chief Executive Steve Easterbrook told investors on Wednesday that 60% of the chain’s delivery orders come in the evening and late at night. Getting burger delivery right—keeping the patty warm and juicy, while preventing toppings from getting the bun soggy—is notoriously tricky.....Even upscale restaurants are joining the delivery bandwagon. Some are so confident they are even eschewing tables and chairs.......Delivery only accounts for 3% of restaurant purchases nationwide, but it is growing fast. Non-pizza delivery purchases have risen by 30% in the past four years, according to market-research firm NPD Group Inc.....The exponential growth of delivery comes with a new set of challenges. Some restaurants are struggling to figure out how to properly staff their kitchens to handle both in-store demand and delivery orders......Working with third-party delivery services is an expensive proposition, because many of them charge restaurants a hefty fee—usually a share of order sales ranging from 17% to 30%—to participate and the restaurants lose out on high-margin sales like alcohol and soft drinks that people tend to order when they are eating on the premises.......delivery is the future: “As driverless cars and drones become the norm I think we’ll all be emailing Amazon and getting a drone delivering a sandwich.”
restaurants  fast-food  fast-casual  Uber  UberEats  McDonald's  upscale  lunchtime  delivery_services  in-store 
june 2017 by jerryking
The rise of the instant-delivery lunch - The Globe and Mail
ANN HUI - NATIONAL FOOD REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 05, 2016

Foodora – a global firm that operates in more than 11 countries but is based in Germany – acquired the Toronto-based Hurrier, and also partners with local restaurants to provide delivery. Foodora itself was acquired last year by Delivery Hero, a food-delivery company valued at more than $3-billion
food  instant_gratification  delivery  UberEats  perishables  time-based  home-delivery  prepared_meals  restaurants  mobile_applications  Foodora  Feast  lunchtime  delivery_services 
april 2016 by jerryking
The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ
December 11, 2013, 7:34 PM

The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything

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Tom Gara
delivery  time-based  Amazon  AmazonFresh  supply_chains  UPS  EBay  EBay_Now  shippers  perishables  logistics  delivery_times  speed  fulfillment  same-day  delivery_services  fast-paced 
december 2013 by jerryking

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