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jerryking : demand-driven   6

Nokia a lesson for backers of Canada’s nanny state - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | BRIAN LEE CROWLEY.

How did it all go so wrong? And what might Canada learn from Finland’s downfall?

One obvious conclusion is not to put all your eggs in one basket, but it goes well beyond that. There was a time when economic change worked slowly enough that you could get a generation or two’s employment out of an industry before it was overtaken by innovation. Detroit dominated automobile manufacturing for many decades before its own complacency and the innovativeness of European and Asian producers came into play. In a similar vein, Nokia allowed itself to believe in its own infallibility, and Finland meekly followed suit. But the forces of change are now so powerful and lightning fast that sometimes a single product release from a competitor can signal the death knell of a previously healthy company or industry....Canada is rife with industries with their heads stuck in the sand, almost invariably because they believe they can shelter behind a friendly bureaucrat with a rulebook.

Examples abound in fields as diverse as telecoms, dairy, airlines, broadcasting, taxis and transport. Could there have been a bigger farce than the CRTC’s attempt to manhandle online content provider Netflix?...The real lesson of Nokia’s demise was that there is no substitute for being driven by what customers want, which is quality products and service at the lowest possible price...Every deviation from this relentless focus on what customers actually want makes your market a tasty morsel for the disrupters.
concentration_risk  Nokia  Finland  mobile_phones  disruption  Netflix  Uber  CRTC  complacency  accelerated_lifecycles  protectionism  nanny_state  customer_focus  change_agents  Finnish  demand-driven  lessons_learned  automotive_industry  downfall  change  warning_signs  signals  customer-driven  infallibility  overconfidence  hubris  staying_hungry 
october 2014 by jerryking
Growing at a Smart Pace
Growing at a Smart Pace

What Every CEO Should Know About Creating New Businesses
1 Ultimately, growth means starting new businesses.
Most firms have no alternative. Sectors decline, as they did for Pullman’s railroad cars and Singer’s sewing machines. Technology renders products and services obsolete—the fate Polaroid suffered, as digital cameras decimated its instant photography franchise. Markets saturate, as Home Depot is now finding, after establishing more than a thousand stores nationwide.
2 Most new businesses fail.
3 Corporate culture is the biggest deterrent to business creation.
New ventures flourish best in open, exploratory environments, but most large corporations are geared toward mature businesses and efficient, predictable operations.
4 Separate organizations don’t work—or at least not for long.
5 Starting a new business is essentially an experiment.
6. New businesses proceed through distinct stages, each requiring a different
7. New business creation takes time--a lot of time.
8. New businesses need help fitting in--"bridging"--with established systems and structures.
9. The best predictors of success are market knowledge and demand-driven products and services.
10. An open mind is hard to find.
growth  Thomas_Stewart  HBR  CEOs  Junior_Achievement  hard_to_find  start_ups  failure  organizational_culture  experimentation  trial_&_error  life_cycle  tacit_data  entrepreneurship  dedication  obsolescence  demand-driven  infrastructure  new_businesses  bridging  large_companies  customer-driven  market_saturation  Home_Depot  Fortune_500  mindsets  open_mind  decline  Michael_McDerment  Polaroid  digital_cameras 
december 2012 by jerryking
Case Study: Sometimes the Market Tells You What It Needs
Jan 10, 2006 | WSJ | Paulette Thomas. .Patrick Martucci
leapfrogged to increasingly challenging jobs across the telecom
industry, setting up distn. channels, running sales depts. An
opportunity arose when he worked at a company that provided maintenance
on Rolm phone equip.. Martucci pitched J.C. Penney, which, after a
trial, offered the maintenance contract for the entire retail chain's
phone service. But his company handled only Rolm equip.in specific
geographies, not the full sprawl of a retailer with a mishmash of phone
sys. Martucci saw what could have been "a $10 M contract go to $1.5 M"
THE SOLUTION: From Chicago, he launched United Asset Coverage, which
would informally stitch together a network to fix anyone's office equip.
-- no matter the brand nor the place, a managed-care approach to the
frustrating world of office-machine maintenance. Martucci told a small
VC fund. "It's a $36 B marketplace & I'm familiar with it,". They
invested a total of "a couple million" $.
voicemail  entrepreneur  opportunistic  maintenance  product_launches  telecommunications  disorganization  retailers  J.C._Penney  managed-care  demand-driven  customer-driven  case_studies  nationwide 
october 2010 by jerryking
It’s innovation that matters
June 11, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Roger Martin, Dean -
Rotman, U of T, Chair - Institute for Competitiveness &Prosperity.
Our public policies designed to increase innovation aren’t working –
and this is because we confuse “innovation” with “invention.” The terms
are actually very different. Invention can be defined as “creation or
discovery of something new to the world,” often producer-driven,
following an inventor’s curiosity or expertise. While new, inventions
may not have any real use. Innovation is customer-driven, providing a
new product or process that adds value to somebody’s life. Innovations
improve economic or social well-being. Innovations are often built from
inventions....Innovation creates value in several ways, such as enabling
consumers to do something that had been impossible or difficult, or at a
lower cost, either by delivering the same benefits as existing
offerings, but at a lower price, or by maintaining the price but
reducing the overall costs of use.
innovation  innovation_policies  Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  Four_Seasons  Harlequin  Manulife  public_policy  inventions  customer-driven  demand-driven 
june 2010 by jerryking
The Protocol Society
Dec. 22, 2009 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. A protocol economy has
very different properties than a physical stuff economy. The success
of an economy depends on its ability to invent and embrace new
protocols, its' “adaptive efficiency,” -- how quickly a society can be
infected by new ideas. Protocols are intangible, so the traits needed to
invent and absorb them are intangible, too. First, a nation has to have
a good operating system: laws, regulations and property rights. Second,
a nation has to have a good economic culture: attitudes toward
uncertainty, the willingness to exert leadership, the willingness to
follow orders. A strong economy needs daring consumers (China lacks
this) and young researchers with money to play with (N.I.H. grants used
to go to 35-year-olds but now they go to 50-year-olds). See “From
Poverty to Prosperity,” by Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz and Richard
Ogle’s 2007 book, “Smart World,” When the economy is about ideas,
economics comes to resemble psychology.
David_Brooks  innovation  books  culture  adaptability  ideaviruses  risk-taking  R&D  N.I.H.  property_rights  regulations  rule_of_law  institutional_integrity  services  digital_economy  rules-based  intellectual_property  demand-driven  psychology  customer-driven  intangibles  behavioural_economics  protocols  poverty  prosperity 
december 2009 by jerryking
Four Lessons from Y-Combinator's Fresh Approach to Innovation
June 12, 2009 | HarvardBusiness.org | by Scott Anthony.
1. You can do a lot for a little.
2. Tight windows enable "good enough" design.
3. Business plans are nice, not necessary.
4. Failure is an option.
Also: Their main motto is (that startups should) "make something people
want". Another prominent theme in their approach is its
hacker-centricity.
Scott_Anthony  innovation  decision_making  lessons_learned  Paul_Graham  Y_Combinator  frugality  demand-driven  constraints  failure  design  customer-driven  insights  market_windows  good_enough 
october 2009 by jerryking

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