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jerryking : demographic_changes   57

A millennial’s hymn to Generation X
October 25, 2019 | Financial Times | by Janan Ganesh

Thought-provoking article by Janan Ganesh arguing that the Gen X cohort are passing through life without having left anywhere near the kind of societal impact of either their larger numbered predecessors, the baby boomers, or their larger numbered successors, the millennials.  Generation X have avoided embracing big ideas,  or embracing nobel causes or political zeal.  lack of passion, big vision, no protest movements, no electoral shocks, etc.  Ganesh argues that Generation X's unpretentiousness--their unwillingness to  made a big splash--is standing them in good stead...."No living generation has shown less interest in changing the world. As a result, no living generation looks wiser today." This is because those who are wildly engaged in causes today (e.g. populism, climate activism, etc.) look like utopian true believers.  By contrast, Generation X'ers look like healthy, sober, sceptics....representing a certain hardheadedness or tough-mindedness or prudence.  Even Generation X' popular cultural touch points, movies like Pulp Fiction and Fargo are really more about the  particular and personal rather the evincing a larger societal message.
Ganan concludes by arguing that it is a category error to misinterpret Generation X's circumspection for mediocrity or ineffectiveness. Many tech company founders are Generation X members. " It is just that these gifts were seldom deployed in public life. The cream of the generation chose business and the arts over politics," Janan
mistrusts vision. Sometimes, vision results in blameless people having to pack their things in the night and flee their own country to survive. I like caution. I like moderately countercyclical fiscal policy with a view to 2.25 per cent annual growth over the period, thanks.
'90s  baby_boomers  demographic_changes  generations  Generation_X  Janan_Ganesh  millennials  popular_culture 
october 2019 by jerryking
Tristan Walker on the Roman Empire and Selling a Start-Up to Procter & Gamble - The New York Times
By David Gelles
Dec. 12, 2018

Tristan Walker founded Walker & Company, a maker of health and beauty products for people of color, in 2013. On Wednesday, the company was acquired by Procter & Gamble for an undisclosed sum. The deal represents a successful exit for Mr. Walker and his investors. It also signals an effort by Procter & Gamble, the maker of Gillette, to reach new markets with its shaving products. But while many start-up founders make a hasty exit after getting acquired, Mr. Walker is planning to stay on and grow Bevel, his men’s shaving brand, and Form, his women’s hair care brand. “We’re a team of 15 with very grandiose ambitions,” he said of Walker & Company, which is based in Palo Alto, Calif., but will move to Atlanta as part of the deal. “We want this company and its purpose to still be around 150 years from now.”

What’s that book you’ve got there?

It’s “Parallel Lives” by Plutarch. I’ve really been getting into Greek and Roman mythology. I’m reading something right now about the history of Rome during the 53 years when they really came into power, and this idea of the Roman state growing, the Greek state growing, and the differences therein fascinate me beyond belief. I’ve just been devouring it for the past few weeks now.

Walker attended the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn. And from there, he got to see how the other half lived. It completely changed his life. He got to see what success could look like. He got to see what wealth was. And it completely changed his worldview.

How so?

I would walk down the halls and see last names like Ford, go to some classes and realize they’re Rockefellers. These are names that were in my imagination. It taught me the importance of name and what that can mean, not only for you but your progeny. When I started at Hotchkiss, I didn’t know what a verb was. So I spent all of my time in the library studying. I spent all of my time thinking about what I wanted to be when I grew up.

What are your priorities as you keep building the company?

I’m dedicating my life to the demographic shift happening in this country. Not only for Silicon Valley. Not only for business. But for this country’s competitiveness. It’s changing. And folks need to respect that and they need to celebrate it.
African-Americans  Bevel  biographies  books  demographic_changes  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  exits  Form  insights  long-term  P&G  Romans  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Tristan_Walker  wealth_creation  black-owned  brands  consumer_goods  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
A crisis for many years, and many reasons, to come - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Sep. 05, 2015

The reasons are easy to identify, the consequences extremely difficult to assess, the solutions complicated and uncertain.

Europe is politically stable and prosperous; Africa and the Middle East are not. Europe’s population is steady or declining; Africa and the Middle East have exploding numbers. Europe’s geography is not seriously affected by climate change; parts of Africa and the Middle East, already dry, are getting drier and therefore less fertile.

War is all but unimaginable in Europe; military conflict is a fact of life in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Libya. Human rights are respected throughout Europe (with a few exceptions); human rights are systematically abused by authoritarian and theocratic regimes in some African and many Middle Eastern countries. Women have made startling advances in almost every walk of European life; women are still discriminated against in too many parts of Africa and the Middle East.

These pressures pushing or enticing large numbers of people toward Europe will not disappear. If anything, they will intensify as the years go on, because climate change, demographic pressures, fierce intrareligious rivalries, the lack of respect for pluralism and a host of other entrenched realities will not bend to moral entreaties or military interventions from Western countries.
mass_migrations  refugees  crisis  Europe  failed_states  Jeffrey_Simpson  root_cause  Non-Integrating_Gap  Functioning_Core  emerging_countries  developed_countries  demographic_changes  decline  climate_change  religious_intolerance  migrants  human_trafficking 
september 2015 by jerryking
Fighting fires with data: How killing the long-form census hurt community planning - The Globe and Mail
JOE FRIESEN - DEMOGRAPHICS REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Most people use the company’s data in conjunction with a mapping tool and segmentation analysis, which sorts the population into lifestyle categories such as “Middleburg Managers” and “Young Digerati,” to better understand their habits and tastes. A library, for example, found that despite having a large population of senior citizens, programs advertised to “seniors” were a bust. Having looked more closely at their income and lifestyle data, they targeted the same group as “mature adults” and had much more success.

“Often, the real power is in the melding of the data. They know things about their users, but not their neighbourhood, then they marry them,” said Doug Norris, chief demographer at Environics Analytics.

Robert Dalgleish, an executive director at the United Church of Canada, is eagerly awaiting new data sorted down to the DA level. He said more than 500 local congregations in the church use this kind of data to better understand the areas they inhabit. One puzz-ling finding was that for every identified member of the United Church in a congregation, there are nine others living within a few kilometres who never attend a service.

“The data doesn’t give us answers, but it gives us really good questions,” Mr. Dalgleish said. “It really allows congregations to drill down into their communities.”
Joe_Friesen  demographic_changes  data  mapping  local  data_melding  neighbourhoods  market_segmentation  analytics  churches  Statistics_Canada  firefighting  Environs  customer_segmentation 
june 2014 by jerryking
Boardroom shifts spell trouble for big banks
Nov. 26 2013 | The Globe and Mail | BOYD ERMAN.
New directors bring new relationships, and Canada’s greying boardrooms herald an opportunity for foreign and independent investment banks that are steadily making inroads in the Canadian market...The days are long gone of an investment banker sitting on a Canadian company’s board and steering all the advisory business to his own bank (let’s be honest, odds are it was a man). Rules on director conflicts have largely ended that. But name a Canadian company and most people in finance can recite the house banker, and it’s often one that does the lending.

Those relationships are not going to just go away. But the potential for conflict of interest is going to mean that the major banks are going to find themselves sharing merger fees more often with outside firms that are independent. Board renewal is only going to accelerate that.
Boyd_Erman  boards_&_directors_&_governance  conflicts_of_interest  advice  banks  demographic_changes  investment_banking  Bay_Street  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  relationships 
november 2013 by jerryking
America's Farm Workforce Is Aging - WSJ.com
August 12, 2013 | WSJ | By MIRIAM JORDAN

America's Farm-Labor Pool Is Graying
Growers Say Reliance on Aging Workers Shows Urgent Need for Immigration Overhaul
workforce  aging  agriculture  farming  demographic_changes  immigration 
august 2013 by jerryking
Junk Mail Gets Personal - WSJ.com
January 23, 2013 | WSJ | By JOEL SCHECTMAN

Junk Mail Gets Personal
Big Data Is Helping Direct Marketers Refine Their Pitches.

While Americans are sending a third less mail than they did 10 years ago, the junk-mail business is staying afloat, thanks to changes in databases, computing power and available storage.

Using Big Data—a catchall phrase for a combination of analytic software and huge computer storage—direct marketers have been able to refine their pitches with a newly startling precision.

A decade ago, these companies might have had 10 pieces of information about each individual household. The new approach allows direct marketers to immediately comb through hundreds of sources of public and private data and assemble more specific demographics, such as young, upper middle-class families with teenage kids who like gadgets.

"Instead of taking a month, you're talking about sub-seconds, in some cases" to run a query on the data,... Jennifer Elwood, executive director of consumer marketing for charitable organization American Red Cross, said the melding of online personas and home addresses is the "holy grail" of direct mail because those profiles can provide clues about potential donors' concerns. That allows the organization to avoid donor fatigue by more carefully targeting people with a smaller number of requests.

Despite the organization's progress in the use of data analytics, tying data from online interactions with donors to snail-mail campaigns is still "a work in progress," Ms. Elwood said, and there is sometimes duplication between paper and online promotions.
direct-mail  direct-response  marketing  massive_data_sets  microtargeting  demographic_changes 
january 2013 by jerryking
A Recipe to Enhance Innovation - NYTimes.com
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Published: November 15, 2012

it is worth thinking hard about how to make diverse teams effective, and how people who straddle two cultural worlds can succeed....In “Connecting the Dots Within: Creative Performance and Identity Integration,” Chi-Ying Cheng, of Singapore Management University, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and Fiona Lee, also at the University of Michigan, argue that ethnic minorities, and women in male-dominated professions, are most creative when they have found a way to believe that their “multiple and conflicting social identities are compatible.”... Their conclusion was that people who have found a way to reconcile their two identities — Asian-Americans, for example, or women who work in male-dominated jobs like engineering — are the best at finding creative solutions to problems..... In other words, if the world around us tells us our dual identities are compatible, we will believe that, and act accordingly. If female engineers work in a company that treats their gender as a virtue, they will do better. If Asian-Americans live in a community that celebrates both aspects of their identity, they will be more effective.

America’s rainbow coalition won at the ballot box this month, but in other settings, the nation has become a little weary of diversity-cheering movements like multiculturalism and even explicit feminism. Dr. Cheng’s work suggests that cynicism may be misplaced. Diversity can work, but we have to work at it.
Chrystia_Freeland  demographic_changes  ethnic_communities  diversity  cross-cultural  books  teams  innovation  connecting_the_dots  dual-consciousness  heterogeneity 
december 2012 by jerryking
Surfing the Silver Tsunami
One quarter of CEOs say they can’t pursue market opportunities or strategic initiatives because they don’t have the talent they need. And you thought the economy was sluggish! Fact is, the en masse departure of the Baby Boom from the workforce is creating some critical gaps, and human resources professionals and recruiters are working hard to fill them.
talent_management  talent  aging  baby_boomers  grey_tsunami  human_resources  Ivey  alumni  demographic_changes  market_opportunities  retirement  bow_wave 
october 2012 by jerryking
Pack 'em in with good chat
November 15, 1999 | Internet World | Cliff Figallo
websites  demographic_changes  interactivity 
september 2012 by jerryking
Black script needs new players
September 5, 1991 | Share Newspaper | letter to the editor by Malcolm Streete in response to article by Dr. Sheldon Taylor (August 1, 1991).

If problems as seen by Taylor do exist, it was even more important for him to state that cannot be addressed concretely and effectively, until some respected and credible leadership forward with a strategy.
The tragedy engulfing this whole scenario is that in Metropolitan Toronto and regions, with the largest population of Blacks in Canada, we continue In deal controversy and failure in the same manner:
* Without plan or strategy;
* With moral goals, instead of tangible, physical goals; and
* With old faces. using outdated models. that alienate the new.
More importantly --and at the same time, very damagingly-- so many of us have become too socially and economically comfortable, and have deserted the community.
There is also the growing reality that we have begun to separate ourselves from those now arriving from the Continent of Africa, without recognizing the fact that they are beginning to make up a sizable part of our growing community.
Unfortunately for Black people in Canada. the dominant culture views us in an unchanging stereotypical manner, all painted with the same Black brush. Thus. we need to look for solutions in places we have never looked before.

When we see the changing demographics of both our community and the broader community. we see an expanding pool of resources.

Firstly. there are the young, articulate and energized females and males, who are more than capable of giving our aims directions, strategies and visions.

Next. with the older torch-bearers passing the torch to this new ‘and important younger generation. we can act as an ocean of resources, sharing our experiences, knowledge. contacts and financial

Finally, let us get our act together and build a cultural centre, through which we can begin to exert some kind of control over our politics, education, economics and destiny.
letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  reinventing_the_wheel  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  leadership  institutions  community  renewal  self-reliance  institution-building  complacency  demographic_changes  strategic_thinking  Sheldon_Taylor 
august 2012 by jerryking
Three big questions for the 21st century
Jun. 21 2012 |The Globe and Mail |CHRYSTIA FREELAND, Special to The Globe & Mail.

it is no accident that so many economies are sputtering at the same time, or that so many people around the globe are angry.

One reason for the synchronized gloom is the synchronization of the global economy. Another is that everyone is trying to figure out three big questions, the answers to which will shape the 21st century.

The first is how nation-states fit into a globalized world economy.
The second question is even knottier. Why is 21st-century capitalism failing at the very important task of delivering jobs and rising incomes to the middle class in rich countries.
The third question is one we speak about the least and should probably worry about the most: Can rich women be persuaded to have children? Why, once a country achieves middle-income status, its middle-class women stop having many children.
Chrystia_Freeland  21st._century  middle_class  demographic_changes  job_destruction  job_displacement  think_threes  global_economy 
july 2012 by jerryking
America the Beautiful Is Also America the Complicated
December 19, 200| WSJ | George Melloan.

Tocquevillians versus Gramscians where Gramscians see any society, including America, as an arena where the 'marginalized' are necessarily at war with the privileged classes.
demographic_changes  elections  interest_groups  New_York_City  victimhood  class_warfare 
july 2012 by jerryking
Fujitsu Helps Farmers 'Cloud Compute' - WSJ.com
January 18, 2011 | WSJ | By DAISUKE WAKABAYASHI

Shinpuku Seika has placed sensors out in its fields to collect readings on temperature, soil and moisture levels. Fujitsu's computers then crunch the data and recommend when to start planting or what crops may be well-suited to a specific field....The significance of the cloud is the farmer doesn't have to build the sytem. The devices connect via wireless network. The internet is already built, the data center is already built. The farmer doesn't have to hire an IT staff and stays focused on farming, now with the help of the technology.
Japan  farming  agriculture  cloud_computing  sensors  GPS  demographic_changes  Japanese 
june 2012 by jerryking
What Business Would You Start?
Mar 1, 2002 | Inc. Magazine |By Thea Singer.

The simple answer to the question 'How do you do this?' is, you find a really large market -- or one that's going to be large -- that's inefficient, and you come up with a breakthrough way of delivering value to customers that nobody has ever done before.
start_ups  advice  entrepreneur  opportunities  Dell  demographic_changes  financial_services  healthcare  education  travel  large_markets  inefficiencies 
may 2012 by jerryking
TitusOneNine - Simon Houpt: A hint of hubris mars the afterglow of Obama’s win
11. driver8 wrote:

#10 I agree with much that you say, especially in regards to political under representation of visible minorities. Sadly it remains the case in some contexts both within the US (e.g. Senate) and in both Canada and the UK. In electoral politics that use first past the post voting systems, sadly, it seems that the ethnicity of the electorate remains an important factor in determining outcomes. The visible minority make up of the US is importantly different than for example both Canada and the UK.

Black Americans comprised 27% of the population of New York in the 2000 census. The 2006 census showed about 7% of the population of metropolitan Toronto was black.

In 2000 the black population formed almost 16% of the total population of New York State. In Ontario in 2001 people of African and Caribbean origin were a bit under 5% of the population.

In the 2001 census black Canadians were a little over 2% of the population. In 2000 approximately 13% of Americans reported themselves as black or black and at least one additional “race”.

In the UK progress is being made as parties select more visible minority candidates to stand for election. I don’t know how political parties select candidates in Canada. Is the same happening there?
November 10, 8:15 pm | [comment link]
crossborder  visible_minorities  Toronto  demographic_changes  African-Americans  African_Canadians 
april 2012 by jerryking
Go west, young Canadians - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 09, 2012

The country’s economic, demographic and political power are all shifting. Western power has already begun to change our national values. Stephen Harper’s majority was no fluke. He was elected by a new coalition of westerners and voters in the suburbs of Toronto. These people prefer CTV to the CBC. They think Ottawa and government should matter less, and they seldom think about Quebec at all. This is an epochal shift.
demographic_changes  Alberta  Quebec  population_growth  population_trends  Margaret_Wente  commodities  oil_industry  Saskatchewan  natural_resources 
february 2012 by jerryking
Mark Mills and Julio Ottino: The Coming Tech-led Boom - WSJ.com
JANUARY 30, 2012

The Coming Tech-led Boom
Three breakthroughs are poised to transform this century as much as telephony and electricity did the last....

By MARK P. MILLS AND JULIO M. OTTINO

In January 2012, we sit again on the cusp of three grand technological transformations with the potential to rival that of the past century. All find their epicenters in America: big data, smart manufacturing and the wireless revolution.
massive_data_sets  manufacturers  3-D  wireless  breakthroughs  epicenters  smartphones  mobile_applications  demographic_changes  Colleges_&_Universities 
february 2012 by jerryking
Exotic vegetables coming soon from a farmer near you - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 05, 2012 | Globe & Mail | Rita Trichur.

One estimate pegs domestic sales of exotic vegetables at roughly $800-million a year. The bulk of that produce is imported from the Caribbean, South America and Asia. But with demand booming, Canadian farmers have a fresh incentive to carve out a meaningful slice of that market by diversifying their crops.

Although cooler Canadian climates can present a production challenge, scientists spearheading world crop research at the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre near Niagara Falls, Ont., say a surprising number of exotic vegetables can be successfully grown across the country.
vegetables  ethnic_communities  demographic_changes  farming  agriculture  food  Wal-Mart  Sobeys  immigrants  Loblaws 
january 2012 by jerryking
SOMETIMES RACE IS SIMPLY A FACTOR
October 31, 2002 | National Post | Christie Blatchford

As the Star study also apparently revealed, black people represent almost 27% of all violence charges such as homicides, sex assaults and gun-related offences -- a percentage way out of whack in a city where, according to the most recent census figures, only 8.1% of Torontonians described themselves as black.

(Interestingly, the headline on this story, which read ''Black crime rates highest,'' was corrected the next day, lest anyone got the wrong impression: It was true, the correction said, that black Torontonians accounted for the highest amount of violent crime, but that did not mean they have the highest crime rate, ''which the Star's analysis of Toronto police data did not measure.'' Huh?)
Christie_Blatchford  statistics  Julian_Fantino  murders  Toronto  race  criminality  killings  political_correctness  silence  demographic_changes  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  Toronto_Police_Service  criminal_justice_system  violent_crime 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why we should like older people - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 19, 2011 |Globe and Mail | LILLIAN ZIMMERMAN

It’s past time to stop painting pictures of older Canadians as draining
our economy and start reflecting the positive realities of their lives.
aging  ageism  demographic_changes 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Triumph of the Humanities - NYTimes.com
June 13, 2011,By STANLEY FISH.

There is now a (relatively) new discipline in which this breaking down
of time into spatial units that are read vertically rather than
horizontally is the obligatory gesture. It calls itself GeoHumanities
and its project is nicely encapsulated in the title of one of the essays
in a collection that officially announces the emergence of a field of
study. The collection is called “GeoHumanities: Art, History, Text at
the Edge of Place”; the essay (by Edward L. Ayers, an historian and
president of the University of Richmond) is entitled “Mapping Time.”

Ayers’s project is to map the changes that followed upon the
emancipation of the slaves after the Civil War. He and his colleagues
begin with a simple map and then they locate populations on the
landscape and “put down one layer after another: of race, of wealth, of
literacy, of water courses, of roads, of railways, of soil type, of
voting patterns, of social structure.”
Stanley_Fish  humanities  digital_humanities  geography  geohumanities  New_York  reservoirs  mapping  books  Civil_War  Emancipation  African-Americans  demographic_changes  metaphysical  metadata  overlay_networks 
june 2011 by jerryking
Being Hassan Nasrallah - WSJ.com
JULY 18, 2006 | | By BRET STEPHENS. Nasrallah is the
secretary general of Hezb Allah, or Party of God, which holds 14 of
parliament's 128 seats, including a seat in the cabinet. He provoked the
2006 war with Israel....Hezbollah's political future. Here's a fact
about Lebanon that many people would rather forget: The birth rate among
Shiites averages between eight and nine per household. By contrast,
Sunni households produce about five children, while Christians and Druze
average two. Yet Lebanon's antiquated "confessional" political system,
based in part on a 1932 census, gives Christians half the seats in
parliament (as well as the presidency), while Shiites, who may already
be a majority, are allotted only 27 seats. Is this "democratic"?
Nasrallah thinks not. For years, his political strategy has been to
consolidate Hezbollah's position among Shiites and co-opt the
ever-weakening Christians in a common alliance against the Sunnis.
Lebanon  Israel  2006  Hezbollah  Hassan_Nasrallah  Bret_Stephens  demographic_changes  Shiites 
april 2011 by jerryking
Kraft calls on star chefs to capture immigrant market - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 12, 2011 |G&M | WENCY LEUNG. Major North American food
companies have been expanding their overseas mkts. for decades. But
targeting ethnic consumers on home turf is still relatively uncharted
territory. Industry analysts say that’s changing, as shifting
demographics in Canada force mainstream food companies to recognize new
growth opportunities among domestic minority groups. Last yr, Campbell
Canada launched a new line of halal-certified soups to cater to a
growing population of Muslim Canadians. This past February, the
country’s largest grocer, Loblaw, appointed a new president with
extensive knowledge of Asian markets. Following Loblaw’s 2009 purchase
of Asian supermarket chain T&T, the company’s appointment of Vicente
Trius as president underscores its intention to attract diverse
customers.As Loblaw exec. chair. Galen Weston said at the appointment,
Mr. Trius “has an understanding of Asian retail, South Asian retail and
what constitutes a great way to grab those customers.”
Kraft  ethnic_communities  immigrants  Loblaws  demographic_changes  uncharted_problems  food  retailers  product_launches  chefs 
april 2011 by jerryking
McGurn: A Requiem for Detroit - WSJ.com
MARCH 29, 2011 WSJ By WILLIAM MCGURN. A once-great American
city today repels people of talent and ambition.....What's left is the
city so embarrassingly exposed by the census figures, a place that
people are fleeing as fast as they can. Think of all the dysfunctional
measures you can: poverty rates, unemployment, crime, failing public
schools, falling home values. Detroit has them all, and most of its
indicators rank among the worst in the nation.
Detroit  leadership  Dave_Bing  William_McGurn  demoralization  population_trends  downward_mobility  demographic_changes  dysfunction 
april 2011 by jerryking
Streetwise strategy for an urban future
March 28 2011 | FT.com | By Andrew Hill. The McKinsey Global
Institute, the consultancy’s research arm, has projected how hundreds of
cities may fuel the global economy in 2025. Its “Urban World” report
suggests a bigger contribution to growth, the lodestone of corporate
strategy, will come from places below the top rank than from megacities
like Shanghai, New York and Delhi. What’s more, 230 of those places –
“middleweight” cities, poised to expand – don’t even appear in today’s
top 600.

The report sends an urgent invitation to companies to rethink their
country- and continent-specific approach to strategy and look more
closely at urban centres and clusters. Farewell, Emea and Brics. Hello,
Huambo, Medan and Viña del Mar.
McKinsey  urban  Richard_Florida  demographic_changes  North_Star  cities  China  unilever  Yum_Brands  clusters  megacities  growth  global_economy 
march 2011 by jerryking
Another new world order
Sep. 04, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Kevin Lynch. So, what
shape will this new world order take? Let’s start with globalization.
the information revolution is reshaping how we work, communicate, and
interact. Overlay on this the demographics of aging and the potential
consequences of climate change....Canada’s strengths are impressive and
extend well beyond our strong fiscal situation, stable financial sector,
bountiful resources, agriculture capacity and proximity to the richest
market in the world....In the midst of this changing world order lies
the opportunity for Canada to stake out new markets in emerging-economy
giants like China, India and Brazil, to refocus our market presence in
the United States toward rapidly growing regions and sectors, and to
make Canada more innovative in what we produce and more productive in
how we produce it. It is an opportunity we cannot afford to squander.
21st._century  Canada  Kevin_Lynch  globalization  BRIC  demographic_changes  aging  beyondtheU.S. 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Wealth Explosion: The New Yacht Club
Winter 2007 | The Wilson Quarterly | by Steven Lagerfeld.
So if one were to derive from this history some guidelines for the rich,

Rule #1 might be Don't Reflexively Resist Change. Rule #2: Share the
Wealth. Rule #3: Play by the Rules. Rule #4: Police Your Friends.Rule
#5: Stay Competitive.
high_net_worth  rules_of_the_game  ProQuest  trends  demographic_changes  economics 
may 2010 by jerryking
Mining the golden years
Feb. 19, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by RASHA MOURTADA.
""Aging is the largest growing business in the world," says Jane
Barratt, secretary-general of the Toronto-based International Federation
on Ageing. "It's going to happen to all of us." Furniture and home
design are key. "It affects everything from the height of the bed,
automatic taps in the bathroom, how to get in and out of furniture," Dr.
Barratt says. "In Japan, we already have kitchen cabinets that can go
up and down to adjust for height."

Equally as important are technology advances in the home that will
support independent living. Smart phones are being transformed from
Web-browsing devices to tools that can measure vital signs and deliver
that information to family and doctors. Sensor technology that will send
alerts if a person with dementia wanders beyond certain boundaries is
being developed. And we're already seeing communication tools that will
more easily enable older people to stay in touch with family.
Rasha_Mourtada  aging  opportunities  demographic_changes  baby_boomers  furniture  design 
february 2010 by jerryking

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