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jerryking : demographics   3

10 Ways to Stumble in Commercial Real Estate -
November 12, 2006 | New York Times |By VIVIAN MARINO

(1) NO FINANCIAL PLAN
“The first step for investing in anything — whether it’s real estate or diamonds — is to have a plan, and your plan is based on your goals,”..... are you looking for a property that can be leased out, generating a monthly cash flow? Or, do you want to make a quick profit with a property that can appreciate in value after improvements?

You will also need to focus on a specific property type, based on personal interest and expertise. Mr. Cummings suggests taking on partners with “personal knowledge or specific talent dealing with this category of property.” He also recommends having an exit strategy,
(2) THINKING LOCATION ONLY
“It’s not location, location, location — it’s location, use and approval,” ......While finding a good location in a well-traveled corridor is important, he explained, you must also ensure that the proposed use for a property fits within zoning and deed restrictions as well as other local laws. That’s a crucial part of due diligence.

(3) NOT RESEARCHING A CITY
Even with zoning laws on your side, you may still be unable to move ahead with plans. “Some communities are getting impossible to develop,”.....Although a site may be properly zoned for such buildings, local planning boards might object that a design and scope of a project are incompatible with the area.

(4) SEEING ALL AREAS AS SIMILAR
“Real estate is a local singular market,” ......“What goes on in San Francisco may appear to be the same as what is going on in Chicago or Miami, but in reality it is not.” You need to explore an area’s demographics — learning, for instance, the average age of the residents and potential customers, as well as household income. And while you’re at it, check on the prevailing rents, along with vacancy rates and property taxes. Some of this information can be found by contacting the local government or Chamber of Commerce, and by talking with neighboring business owners.

(5) NO THOUGHT TO TENANT MIX
you can’t expect to draw much business unless you have the right mix of tenants, both within your property and in the neighborhood. An “anchor,” or a business with a history of successful performance, can help.

(6) MISCALCULATING COSTS
uncover hidden problems in a building — structural, mechanical or environmental. The seller can then decide to fix the problems or renegotiate the sales price........set aside a cushion for future repairs or improvements. (Even tenants with so-called triple-net leases, in which they agree to pay all the continuing operating expenses like property taxes, may need to have a property reconfigured to meet their needs.)

“Many people do not take the time necessary to quantify deferred maintenance — from an antiquated heating system to a leaking roof to holes in the parking lot,”

(7) MISCALCULATING RETURNS
To get an idea of your initial rate of return, or capitalization rate, review expenses and income for the most recent year.

Some brokers and investors base their calculations on occupancy rates at or close to 100 percent. But take into account the likelihood of vacancies,

(8) TAKING ON ONEROUS DEBT
commercial-property land, can come with very onerous terms!!

(9) DOING IT ALL YOURSELF
experienced investors typically have a group of experts in place, including brokers, engineers, lawyers, accountants and property managers, to help with conducting due diligence.

(10) PROCRASTINATION
What good is doing the research if you never put it to use?
anchor_tenants  commercial_real_estate  debt  demographics  exits  financial_planning  hidden  investors  IRR  land_uses  miscalculations  missteps  pitfalls  procrastination  real_estate  rules_of_the_game  zoning 
september 2012 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking
Political Device Goes Corporate - WSJ.com
MAY 21, 2007 | Wall street Journal | by JOHN D. MCKINNON.

Journal of Political Marketing.

Political operatives who perfected political "microtargeting," a system
for squeezing votes from neglected segments of the electorate, based
largely on reams of data about such things as voter demographics and
personal-spending habits--are taking their mastery of sophisticated new
campaign techniques into the corporate world. Particularly useful in
helping corporations focus on potential customers' core feelings about
buying a product or service.
microtrends  microtargeting  demographics  competingonanalytics  data_mining  political_campaigns  customer_insights  customer_experience  behavioural_targeting  data 
april 2009 by jerryking

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