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jerryking : developing_countries   46

US navy secretary warns of ‘fragile’ supply chain
November 4, 2019 | Financial Times | by Peter Spiegel and Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson in New York.

Richard Spencer says America is at risk of relying on China and Russia for critical warship components.....many contractors are reliant on single suppliers for certain high-tech and high-precision parts, increasing the likelihood they would have to be procured from geostrategic rivals.......moreover, China (Beijing) was trying to “weaponize capital” through its Belt and Road Initiative whereby Beijing offers developing countries “loan to own” debt that they could not pay back in order to gain leverage over critical assets.....efforts to improve the domestic supply chain have been hampered by repeated government shutdowns and haphazard federal budgeting in recent years......undermining the ability to convince domestic suppliers that there will be a steady stream of business for them if they invest in building out their manufacturing capabilities......the Secretary of the U.S. Navy has recently launched a “trusted capital” programme whereby large private equity firms are invited to bid on failing or non-existent supply needs in areas from ship maintenance to weapons manufacturing.
adversaries  China  developing_countries  fragility  industrial_policies  maritime  military-industrial_complex  One_Belt_One_Road  precision  private_equity  rivalries  Russia  security_&_intelligence  supply_chains  U.S._Navy  SPOF 
november 2019 by jerryking
Past mistakes carry warnings for the future of work
May 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by SARAH O'CONNOR.

* Data can mislead unless combined with grittier insights on the power structures that underpin it.
* William Kempster, a master mason who worked on St Paul's Cathedral in the 18th century, left wage records that helped expose a flaw in our understanding of the past.

It is often said that we should learn from the mistakes of the past. But we can also learn from the mistakes we make about the past. Seemingly smooth data can mislead unless it is combined with a grittier insight into the structures, contracts and power relationships that underpin the numbers. On that score, economists and politicians who want to make sense of today’s labour market have an advantage over historians: it is happening right now, just outside their offices, in all its complexity and messiness. All they have to do is open the door
17th_century  18th_century  builders  contextual  data  datasets  developing_countries  economic_history  economists  freelancing  gig_economy  handwritten  historians  human_cloud_platforms  insights  labour_markets  London  messiness  mistakes  politicians  power_relations  power_structures  record-keeping  United_Kingdom  unstructured_data  wages  white-collar 
may 2019 by jerryking
Globe editorial: Why the Meng case feels like a replay of 2001 - The Globe and Mail
On Sept. 10, 2001, if you’d asked a random collection of international policy experts to name the biggest challenge to the global order, most of them would have given a one-word answer: China.....And then 9/11 happened. Nearly two decades later, it’s as if the world has awakened from that detour to find itself at its original destination, and much sooner than expected.

A China once rising has now risen – by some measures, it’s already the world’s largest economy......It’s why the arrest this month of Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, and China’s response, feel like a kind of replay of the Hainan incident – but under very different circumstances. Compared with 2001, today’s China is far more powerful. It is also more than ever at the centre of the global economic and political system. Yet, it doesn’t always follow the rules and norms of that system. And that has created a paradox – the paradox expected by pre-9/11 analysts. China is part of the system. It is also an antagonist.

Though it’s put itself and its products at the centre of the international economy, China also operates with one foot outside of the international order. For example, it’s part of the WTO and its free-trade rules, from which it benefits. But it takes advantage of the rules more than it follows them.

It’s part of a global co-operative of organizations such as Interpol....but earlier this year, the man it placed at the head of the organization was effectively disappeared by his own government.....It’s also a government that responded to the arrest of Ms. Meng by kidnapping two Canadians on invented charges...The case is a reminder of the two big China challenges that Ottawa, and its allies, must grapple with.

The fact that China is part of the international economy and the largely open movement of goods and people is a good thing.....However, China has abused the invitation to join the international trading system. The Trump administration is right that China is an unfair trader. The trade relationship has to be realigned. The goal should not be to shut China out. It must be to ensure that China is made fully part of the system and is bound by rules imposed by the rest of the developed world, which together is much wealthier and more powerful than China.
Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  developing_countries  editorials  foreign_policy  Huawei  international_system  Meng_Wanzhou  multipolarity  paradoxes  piracy  reprisals  rogue_actors  U.S.-China_relations  WTO 
december 2018 by jerryking
Cool Ways Of Keeping Things Cool People Fixing The World podcast
People Fixing The World « »
Cool Ways of Keeping Things Cool
16 weeks ago 23:18

A vast and expensive system with the sole purpose of keeping things cool exists across the developed world. This “cold chain” includes fridges in kitchens, refrigerated lorries and cold store warehouses for supermarket produce and medicines. It costs billions to run and has a big environmental cost. But in poorer countries, this cold chain is just in its infancy. People are dying as health clinics lack the fridges to keep vaccines safe. New cold chain technology is needed and two inventors think they’ve figured it out. World Hacks looks at their innovative ways of keeping things chilled. Presenter: Harriet Noble Reporter: Tom Colls
BBC  cold_storage  inventions  inventors  podcasts  developing_countries 
december 2018 by jerryking
Not if the Seas Rise, but When and How High - The New York Times
By JENNIFER SENIOR NOV. 22, 2017

The Water Will Come
Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World
By Jeff Goodell
340 pages. Little, Brown. $28

Political time now lags behind geological time: If we don’t take dramatic steps to prepare for the rising seas, hundreds of millions could be displaced from their homes by the end of the century, and the infrastructure fringing the coast, valued in the trillions of dollars, could be lost.....Unfortunately, human beings are uniquely ill-suited to prepare for disasters they cannot sense or see. “We have evolved to defend ourselves from a guy with a knife or an animal with big teeth,” Goodell writes, “but we are not wired to make decisions about barely perceptible threats that gradually accelerate over time.”....he visits cities in peril around the globe: New York; Lagos, Nigeria; Norfolk, Va.; Miami; Venice; Rotterdam..... every coastal city faces its own obstacles to adaptation, and the problems each one faces are different......It is, perhaps, the world’s poor who will suffer most. Goodell devotes a good deal of this book to contemplating their fate. Salty soil has already destroyed the rice crops of the Mekong Delta and Bangladesh. If the sea rises high enough, whole island nations could be washed away. The slum-dwellers of Lagos, Jakarta and other coastal cities in the developing world could be chased from their homes, many of which are already on stilts. The International Organization for Migration estimates there will be 200 million climate refugees by 2050.
climate_change  books  book_reviews  Miami  slowly_moving  sea-level_rise  coastal  imperceptible_threats  developing_countries 
november 2017 by jerryking
A proven identity offers a path to many freedoms
August 11, 2017 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett.

Most of us in the west take it for granted that we have an official identity, both in digital life and real life. We usually only think about it if we are worried that somebody is trying to steal it, or that governments are threatening to breach our privacy.

But in the developing world, the idea of having an identity — be that digital or in any other form — is a luxury. It is estimated that some two billion adults around the world do not have a bank account. In emerging markets, some women in particular have no way to independently identify themselves, making it difficult for them to protect their rights, access services or lift themselves out of poverty.

“Large numbers of women are unable to take control of their finances because they lack the basic documentation to open a bank account,” Okonjo-Iweala pointed out, noting that around 42 per cent of adult women in developing countries lack a bank account partly because they have no way to show a bank teller (or anyone else) who they are. 

According to research carried out by ID2020, a public-private project that’s trying to promote digital identifier systems: “Experts estimate that 1.5 ­billion people lack any form of officially recognised identification, and that’s one-fifth of the planet.” These tend to be “women and children from the poorest areas of the world”. The United Nations, meanwhile, has declared that one of its sustainable development goals is to provide everybody on the planet with a legal identity by 2030. 

The good news is that all manner of organisations and groups are now getting involved in the cause. The World Bank, for example, is working with private-sector bodies including MasterCard to create digital identities using credit platforms. Ajay Banga, MasterCard CEO, is a vocal champion of this campaign, particularly for women (partly, a cynic might suggest, because he hopes this will create a future market).

ID2020 is spearheading another non-government initiative, in conjunction with groups such as Accenture and Microsoft. Refugee bodies, including the United Nations Development Programme, are trying to create digital identities for people in camps.
digital_identity  identity  Gillian_Tett  emerging_markets  women  children  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  low-income  developing_countries 
august 2017 by jerryking
Robocalypse Now? Central Bankers Argue Whether Automation Will Kill Jobs - The New York Times
By JACK EWING JUNE 28, 2017

artificial intelligence threatens broad categories of jobs previously seen as safe from automation, such as legal assistants, corporate auditors and investment managers. Large groups of people could become obsolete, suffering the same fate as plow horses after the invention of the tractor.

“More and more, we are seeing economists saying, ‘This time could be different,’”......among the economists in Sintra there was plenty of skepticism about whether the Robocalypse is nigh......Robocalypse advocates underestimate the power of scientific advances to beget more scientific advances, said Joel Mokyr, a professor at Northwestern University who studies the history of economics.....Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google — whose self-driving technology may someday make taxi drivers unnecessary — said that the plunging cost of information technology “has virtually eliminated the fixed cost of entering a business.” Companies can rent software and computing power over the internet..... disruptions caused by technology help account for rampant pessimism among working-class and middle-class people across the developed world.
artificial_intelligence  automation  Benjamin_Bernanke  central_banks  David_Autor  developing_countries  economists  fixed_costs  Hal_Varian  job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  Joel_Mokyr  pessimism 
june 2017 by jerryking
Pimco’s Strategy for Life After Gross: Go Beyond ‘Bonds and Burgers’ - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER
Updated Nov. 7, 2016

The 53-year-old Frenchman, who joined Pimco in the past week, intends to push it deeper into hedge funds, real-estate assets and other alternative investments, people familiar with the matter said. With interest rates in much of the developed world near zero, those kinds of investments are in demand from pensions, endowments and other clients. They are also among the types of funds that command higher fees.

Investing in bonds, loans and other forms of debt securities will remain Pimco’s focus, but Mr. Roman will aim to build out capabilities in areas ranging from private credit to quantitative investments based on computer models, the people said.....Pimco, a subsidiary of German insurer Allianz SE, believes the gradual shift into alternatives is its best bet to ride out what many industry executives expect will be a brutal shakeout for asset managers. Tepid returns and the surging popularity of cheaper investment options, including exchange-traded funds, have pressured managers to lower fees.
Pimco  CEOs  alternative_investments  asset_management  capabilities  money_management  ETFs  shakeouts  interest_rates  developed_countries  low-interest  developing_countries 
november 2016 by jerryking
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy? - The Globe and Mail
Scott Barlow
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy?
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 02, 2016

University of California professor Brad DeLong’s “Economics and the Age of Abundance” highlighted the new economic study of global production growth – a new-ish school of thought that attributes much of the economic malaise in the developed world to a technology-driven “too much of everything.....The economic challenges of abundance, however, go far beyond commodities. There’s too many mutual funds, television channels, cereal brands, auto companies (China hasn’t even started exporting cars and trucks yet), land-line telephones, clothing brands, taxis, department stores and, if we’re being honest, journalism. Technology and its ability to increase productivity are to blame for virtually any major market sector beset with poor profit margins and layoffs. ....... The larger problem, and I suspect Mr. DeLong would agree, is that technology increases efficiencies and reduces the need for labour. A dystopian future in which anything can be produced quickly and cheaply, except everyone’s unemployed with no money to spend, is easy to envisage without considerable structural change in the economy.

Unemployment is the most severe outgrowth of abundance and low profitability ....... ......
abundance  economics  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  oversupply  technology  commodities  over_investment  scarcity  innovation  China  productivity  deflation  manufacturers  outsourcing  unemployment  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  books  developed_countries  dystopian_futures  structural_change  developing_countries 
february 2016 by jerryking
ATTENTION TO DETAIL by Dave Martins and The... - Dave Martins and The Tradewinds
the two biggest concerns for me are, in macro, the Indian/black ethnic division, and, in micro, the widespread tendency to accept or even encourage the sub-standard. For someone who has lived in the developed world, for two or three decades, that discinclination or disability to pay attention to detail in the various aspects of our life, is a jolt, and adjusting to that difference is very difficult because it confronts one daily. ....It is a detail, but we don’t seem to have yet understood in Guyana that the difference between good and excellent is always, absolutely always, in the details. Here, we praise the overall structure and seem oblivious to the pieces left hanging.
More pivotally, the lack is across the board. It is not just in the things we build. It is in the presentations we give, in the shows we stage, even in the way we drive. It is rampant in the media. Without fail, every day, there are punctuation errors, or declensions wrong, or verb/subject disagreements in our newspapers, and the lack of attention to detail in how we say what we say infects the broadcast media as well..... A friend of mine, with an awareness of the problem, says that this lack of attention to detail is now part of our cultural make-up; it is a condition of who we are and what we are. It is Guyana’s sociology in 2013. Cynical as that may be, it is a contention to consider....
Guyanese  Guyana  politics  limitations  detail_oriented  ethnic_divisions  quality  standards  substandard  developed_countries  Dave_Martins  shortcomings  developing_countries  pay_attention 
december 2015 by jerryking
We can’t afford a postinstitutional society - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 11 2015 | The Globe and Mail |STEPHEN TOOPE.

Institutions matter. One of the markers of advanced industrial societies is their rich network of institutions that support good governance, ensure security, provide needed social services and foster educated work forces. There is a continuing debate in the developing world about whether strong institutions are needed for economic growth or whether they result from the achievement of a certain income level. What is not in dispute is that successful societies thrive with strong institutions and decay without them.

Crowdsourcing may enable a startup tech company to survive another day; it may help a sick child gain access to specialized medical care. It will never replace a stock exchange or build a health system that’s available to all.

Google may soon produce a car that can drive itself. But that car can function only if there are socially mandated rules of the road that allow programmers to know on what side of the street the car should run, and what to do at a red light.
institutions  rules_of_the_game  good_governance  developed_countries  institutional_integrity  chicken-and-egg  developing_countries 
march 2015 by jerryking
David Chilton’s rise from The Wealthy Barber to The Wealthy Dragon - The Globe and Mail
IAN MCGUGAN
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015,

Clips from the Wealthy Barber

On luck: “I’ve been incredibly lucky in life, and my health is my greatest gift. I don’t work out much, I love Nibs and Diet Pepsi, but I’m never sick a day, I never get a cold, I hardly ever sleep, and it’s all from my mom and dad. They’re in their early 80s and still have crazy energy.”

On the economy: “I try to be optimistic but you have to be concerned about debt levels just about anywhere in the developed world. I think governments are making promises they may not be able to keep. It would not shock me to see another financial crisis at some point over the next three to five years.”

On investing: “It’s shocking how badly many people manage their own investments. Mutual fund fees and expenses are part of that, but we also appear to have mastered the art of buying mutual funds that are just about to underperform.”

On mutual funds: “Paying 2 per cent [in mutual fund fees] doesn’t sound like much, because we still relate things to our high school marks. Losing 2 per cent off a mark of, say, 70 per cent is no big deal. But with mutual funds, you’re talking about losing two percentage points of an estimated 8 per cent or so return. That’s a quarter of your expected gain.”

On alternative investing: “If you’re going to get involved with hedge funds, don’t invest in them, run them.”

On entrepreneurship: “A lot of the people we see on Dragons’ Den have the naive idea that the biggest challenge in business is getting their product on the shelves. It’s not – it’s getting it off the shelves. Once it’s in the store, how do you create demand, how do you make it stand out among the competition?”

On perseverance: “No author in history did more interviews about a single book than I did about The Wealthy Barber. I did hundreds of interviews a year. For years and years and years.”
creating_demand  personal_finance  personal_branding  angels  entrepreneurship  luck  fees_&_commissions  perseverance  debt  investing  writers  authors  developed_countries  developing_countries 
january 2015 by jerryking
What We’re Afraid to Say About Ebola - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL T. OSTERHOLMSEPT. 11, 2014

THE Ebola epidemic in West Africa has the potential to alter history as much as any plague has ever done.

There have been more than 4,300 cases and 2,300 deaths over the past six months. Last week, the World Health Organization warned that, by early October, there may be thousands of new cases per week in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria. What is not getting said publicly, despite briefings and discussions in the inner circles of the world’s public health agencies, is that we are in totally uncharted waters and that Mother Nature is the only force in charge of the crisis at this time.

There are two possible future chapters to this story that should keep us up at night.

The first possibility is that the Ebola virus spreads from West Africa to megacities in other regions of the developing world. This outbreak is very different from the 19 that have occurred in Africa over the past 40 years. It is much easier to control Ebola infections in isolated villages. But there has been a 300 percent increase in Africa’s population over the last four decades, much of it in large city slums. What happens when an infected person yet to become ill travels by plane to Lagos, Nairobi, Kinshasa or Mogadishu — or even Karachi, Jakarta, Mexico City or Dhaka?

The second possibility is one that virologists are loath to discuss openly but are definitely considering in private: that an Ebola virus could mutate to become transmissible through the air. You can now get Ebola only through direct contact with bodily fluids. But viruses like Ebola are notoriously sloppy in replicating, meaning the virus entering one person may be genetically different from the virus entering the next. The current Ebola virus’s hyper-evolution is unprecedented; there has been more human-to-human transmission in the past four months than most likely occurred in the last 500 to 1,000 years. Each new infection represents trillions of throws of the genetic dice.
Ebola  epidemics  viruses  flu_outbreaks  contagions  West_Africa  developed_countries  uncharted_problems  megacities  developing_countries 
september 2014 by jerryking
Why some see big potential in tiny farms - The Globe and Mail
Doug Saunders

Oxford, England — The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Apr. 12 2014,

TechnoServe, a long-established Washington-based non-profit whose 1,400 employees provide technical assistance to small developing-world farmers....Those small farmers don’t produce much food in part because they can’t afford to buy decent seeds and fertilizer. They can’t afford seeds or fertilizer because they can’t borrow money based on their future crop sales. And, Mr. Masha notes, that’s because lending them money can be so expensive: Interest rates on tiny loans are already, by definition, very high; add to that the cost of servicing loans across regions, and the considerable cost of hedging those loans against volatile developing-world currencies, and, he says, “you’ve priced them right out of the credit market.”

Banks and micro-credit agencies are also reluctant to lend because small farmers often have no collateral: Property ownership is ambiguous and few countries have small-claims courts to deal with defaults. (Brazil, an exception, owes a lot of its development success to the creation of such institutions.)

While the potential in these farms is huge, few want to take the risk of building agricultural supply and value chains in the developing world. Such investments take many years to generate returns, which tend to be very modest – rendering them uninteresting to corporations and venture capitalists, but increasingly appealing to Chinese state enterprises and a few people with local knowledge.
smallholders  farming  agriculture  size  scaling  Doug_Saunders  TechnoServe  poverty  tacit_data  supply_chains  value_chains  fertilizers  seeds  SOEs  China  interest_rates  microfinance  microlending  property_ownership  developing_countries  institutions 
april 2014 by jerryking
'Big Mick' returns to mining - and he's hungry for acquisitions
October 1, 2013 | Globe & Mail | ERIC REGULY.

Mick Davis is back in the mining game....Mr. Davis, older, leaner but still hungry, along with a few former Xstrata executives, has launched X2 Resources, a private company that has raised $1-billion (U.S.) and plans to raise more. The goal is to give it the firepower to pounce on mining assets that the X2 executives consider undervalued in a market that has lost its love for commodities....Mr. Davis is bullish on commodities and thinks the selloff that sent mining company values plummeting is overdone, although he does not see a return to the "explosive" demand that turned mining companies such as Xstrata into some of the biggest wealth generators of the pre-2008 era. "We still have a lot of conviction about the resources industry," he said. "We're seeing ongoing demand in the developing world and the rise of consumer markets there."

Mr. Davis built his career on this "stronger-for-longer" theory that was centred on he belief that urbanization in China, India and some parts of sub-Saharan African would send the prices soaring for the copper used in everything from plumbing to the coal burned in electricity plants....In a statement, Jim Coulter, TPG's founding partner, said it invested because "the X2 team has an impressive track record of building metals and mining platforms around the world."
Eric_Reguly  Mick_Davis  Second_Acts  Glencore  staying_hungry  mining  commodities  private_equity  mergers_&_acquisitions  TPG  natural_resources  X2  Xstrata  entrepreneur  privately_held_companies  urbanization  China  India  sub-Saharan_Africa  investment_thesis  undervalued  developing_countries 
october 2013 by jerryking
Is your wardrobe killing Bangladeshis, or saving them? - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 27 2013 |The Globe and Mail | DOUG SAUNDERS.

1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, in which 146 Jewish and Italian immigrants, many under 18, roasted or plunged to their deaths after the owner of the Manhattan clothing factory ignored fire-safety warnings and locked workers inside...led to a changing of the shape of North American cities, factories and working lives: It’s the reason why fire-escape stairs and sprinklers are now ubiquitous; it’s also part of the reason why blue-collar wages, working conditions and child-labour laws improved in the decades that followed, creating the last great period of upward mobility.

There’s good reason to hope for a similar transformation in Bangladesh – especially if consumers demand high standards from their brands, as they have done with considerable success in China.

Garment-factory w orkers in Bangladesh, China, India, Mexico and other corners of the developing world are not victims. They have sought out this work, and they want to be agents of their own fate. They often get a raw deal, but they’re enduring these jobs because the jobs are an improvement over any other alternative – and their engagement with the West’s consumer markets can be the vehicle to greater empowerment.
Doug_Saunders  Bangladesh  Loblaws  exploitation  apparel  unintended_consequences  workplaces  safety  developing_countries 
may 2013 by jerryking
Good leadership is Africa’s missing ingredient
Mar. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail |Robert Rotberg.

Because so many of sub-Saharan Africa’s 49 countries are preinstitutional, and not yet fully nations, leaders matter immensely, more than they do in the developed world. Leaders call the shots, as they have in most sub-Saharan African countries since independence in the 1960s. They set the ethical tone. If leaders are greedy, as many are, their citizens become more cynical and the quality of governmental discourse suffers enormously.

In Africa and elsewhere, governments are expected by their subjects to provide security and safety, rule of law, open political participation, sustainable economic prospects and a large measure of human development (educational and health opportunities and services).

In states where political institutions are weak, legislatures are subordinate to executives, the media are barely free and the judiciary is subordinate rather than independent, the manner in which leaders behave as presidents and prime ministers is much more decisive than it might be in a fully-formed nation where political institutions work and constrain overweening political executives.

A majority of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa are still controlled by men who are motivated not by what they can do for their people but by what their people can do for them. Such leaders exist to prey on their own citizens, to extract from the body politic corrupt rents and other privileges that benefit the ruler and ruling class, their families, and their cliques or lineages.
leadership  leaders  leadership_development  Africa  CIDA  capacity-building  weak_states  judiciary  institutions  greed  rent-seeking  institutional_integrity  failed_states  ruling_classes  sub-Saharan_Africa  Non-Integrating_Gap  autocrats  misgovernance  predatory_practices  developing_countries  independent_judiciary 
march 2013 by jerryking
Finance executive brings innovative strategies to Kenyan business
September 1, 2012 | Report on Business | Paul Waldie.

With the help of contributions from the Sprott Foundation and Barrick Gold Corp., Mr. Di Girolamo created Terra Firma, a Canadian charity that provides business expertise to small businesses in developing countries. The organization began working in Kenya, first with a small food company and lately with a honey business based outside Nairobi called Honey Care Africa. Honey Care has seven full-time employees and about $200,000 in annual sales. Volunteers from Terra Firma have been helping the company revamp its operations, which includes managing bee hives at numerous farms, and improving its marketing. Terra Finna draws volunteers from Canadian businesses and the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, many of whom have travelled to Kenya to work with the companies. Mr. Di Girolamo left for Kenya We believe that business can be part of the solution to world issues.
Paul_Waldie  philanthropy  Brookfield  charities  Kenya  small_business  management_consulting  inspiration  Rotman  developing_countries 
september 2012 by jerryking
Making it in the new industrial revolution
Aug. 29, 2012 | The Financial Times | by Luke Johnson.
Two new books make this point: first, the Financial Times's Peter Marsh in his excellent book The New Industrial Revolution ; and second, Chris Anderson, of The Long Tail fame, in his new title, Makers . They argue that mass production is giving way to customisation, combined with localism, and the emergence of "micro-multinationals".

Digital manufacturing employs computers and a process called stereolithography to make products using layers of either powdered or molten plastic or metal, in what is described as "additive manufacturing". ...whether it is Apple iPhones or Rolls-Royce Trent aero engines, the real profit is not made in the basic assembly of goods. The margins are in servicing, brands, design and after-sales.

Manufacturing contributes to an economy in many ways. As Andrew Liveris, chief executive of Dow Chemical, argues in his book Make It In America , it creates more added value pro rata than other activities, and is much more likely to generate exports to help offset trade deficits. Moreover, research and development tends to take place alongside manufacturing centres, which foster clusters of sub-contractors. It is no coincidence that Germany, Europe's manufacturing powerhouse, has weathered the credit crisis so well compared to other EU nations.

Since the downturn started, many politicians in the developed world have insisted that societies move away from financial capitalism and back towards the real business of making things. If this policy is to succeed, it cannot be the usual formula of enticing global public companies to build multibillion-dollar plants. It must be about education, entrepreneurship and exploiting new equipment on a more bespoke scale. Incremental jobs in manufacturing can come from new, niche entrants using innovations in technology to help make them more of a match for the big incumbents.
manufacturers  Luke_Johnson  3-D  books  DIY  microproducers  Industrial_Revolution  developed_countries  margins  services  brands  design  after-sales_service  Apple  Rolls-Royce  developing_countries 
august 2012 by jerryking
An Entrepreneur's Journey in Africa -
12/6/2004 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Cynthia Churchwell.
HBS MBA Monique Maddy, who started and then closed a telecommunications business in Africa, has interesting insights into the challenges of entrepreneurship in developing countries.
HBR  HBS  Africa  mobile_phones  telecommunications  entrepreneur  developing_countries 
june 2012 by jerryking
Policy Brief: Strengthening Agriculture Marketing with ICT (ICT in Agriculture Sourcebook forum #1) | e-Agriculture
The World Bank, in collaboration with the e-Agriculture Community and FAO, is holding a series of online forums. These forums stem from the launch of the World Bank's ICT in Agriculture e-Sourcebook and the growing demand for knowledge on how to use ICT to improve agricultural productivity and raise smallholder incomes.

The first forum in this series focused on how ICT can improve agricultural marketing in developing countries. It took place 5-16 December 2011, and Sourcebook module 9 set the stage for the discussion. Forum participants looked into the most promising trends and challenges in ICT use (particularly mobile phones) for short- and long-term market information, agri-inputs, logistics and transport.

This summary document captures that discussion.
World_Bank  marketing  agriculture  mobile_phones  3rdWorld  developing_countries 
june 2012 by jerryking
An intellectual with the gloves off
24 May 2003 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3| by John Allemang.

Tellingly, the former World Bank economist didn't just parade these hard facts as essential truths, but contrasted them with the soft-centred nostalgia felt by academics with a more sentimental education. "There's a tendency on the part of Western intellectuals to idealize rural life, and poor rural life, in developing countries."....His model of a university, which sounds a lot like a roundtable gathering at the White House, is of "a tough-minded place where there's a tough-minded clash of ideas, from which better ideas emerge." It's not an institution for the faint-hearted, and you can see that much of his impatience with the people and ideas he's confronted at Harvard have as much to do with a perceived lack of intellectual rigour as with their positioning on the spectrum of truth.
Larry_Summers  Harvard  intellectually_rigorous  deanships  Colleges_&_Universities  grade_inflation  growth  economic_development  truth-telling  tough-mindedness  developing_countries 
may 2012 by jerryking
We Need a Second Party - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: February 11, 2012

The first is responding to the challenges and opportunities of an era in which globalization and the information technology revolution have dramatically intensified, creating a hyperconnected world. This is a world in which education, innovation and talent will be rewarded more than ever. This is a world in which there will be no more “developed” and “developing countries,” but only HIEs (high-imagination-enabling countries) and LIEs (low-imagination-enabling countries).

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Link to Daniel Pink's work on countries cultivating skills and knowledge that are not available at a cheaper price in other countries or that cannot be rendered useless by
machines. That is, embracing play and abundance.
===============================
See Peter A. Georgescu. "The only way this nation can compete with those that produce high-quality products at a lower price is by generating ideas that build a special relationship with consumers," he said. "Everyone has buildings and technology; those are commodities. The only leverageable asset in the future will be creativity."
Tom_Friedman  GOP  design  imagination  education  high-quality  innovation  talent  developed_countries  Daniel_Pink  high-touch  developing_countries 
february 2012 by jerryking
Tackling Canada's thorniest issue
Dec 21, 2001 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.19 | Jeffrey SimpsonJohn Stackhouse's magnificent series on Canada's aboriginals deepened his reputation as one of the two or three best journalists in the country.

Here was a series in The Globe and Mail crafted by an inquiring mind, written with a rare clarity of expression, and based on wisdom's first principle -- an appreciation of complexity.

Mr. Stackhouse was an eyewitness rather than an "I" witness. He invited readers to understand what he saw and heard rather than what he ate for lunch. The best journalists are shoe-leather sociologists who ask, listen and observe.

Mr. Stackhouse displayed a rare gift as a foreign correspondent for asking the right questions, understanding the answers and conveying the complexities of what he found. What worked for him in the developing world was perfectly suited to tackling Canada's thorniest issue: relations between aboriginals and the rest of us.

His series seemed effortlessly written, the way people at the top of their game make whatever they do appear easy.
5_W’s  aboriginals  complexity  curiosity  first_principle  Jeffrey_Simpson  John_Stackhouse  journalists  journalism  wisdom  developing_countries  asking_the_right_questions 
october 2011 by jerryking
No Rice, No Water-- Can You Hear Me Now?
By: Marjorie Valbrun | Posted: May 21, 2008.

Mobile phones are helping people climb out of poverty, spurring small-scale entrepreneurship, promoting development and even helping farmers and market women work more efficiently and earn more money.

The story of what is happening in Haiti is part of a larger trend taking place in developing countries around the globe, particularly in Asia and Africa. The world is witnessing a seismic social, cultural and technological shift that is changing how people work, live and thrive – all because of cell phones.
Haiti  mobile_phones  economic_development  tools  remittances  ZoomPesa  seismic_shifts  developing_countries 
october 2011 by jerryking
World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data
July 2, 2011 | NYT|By STEPHANIE STROM. The World Bank’s
traditional role has been to finance specific projects that foster eco.
dvlpmnt,...it might come as a surprise that its president , Robert
Zoellick, argues that the most valuable currency of the WB isn’t its $—
it is its information. ...For > a yr, the WB has been releasing its
prized data sets, currently giving public access to more than 7,000 that
were previously available only to some 140,000 subscribers — mostly
govts & researchers, who paid for access. ...Those data sets contain
all sorts of info. about the developing world, whether workaday
economic stats — GDP, CPI & the like — or arcana like the # of women
are breast-feeding their children in rural Peru.

It is a trove unlike anything else in the world, and, it turns out,
highly valuable. For whatever its accuracy or biases, this data defines
the economic reality of billions of people and is used in making
policies & decisions that enormously impact their lives.
World_Bank  information_flows  data  databases  massive_data_sets  transparency  open_source  Robert_Zoellick  crowdsourcing  mashups  datasets  decision_making  policymaking  developing_countries 
july 2011 by jerryking
CPCS Transcom helps tame traffic chaos in Lagos - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 27, 2011 | G & M | GEOFFREY YORK. If any company can
handle the unpredictability of Lagos, it would be CPCS Transcom Ltd.,
an Ottawa-based company that serves as lead adviser to the project. The
Canadian company has quietly emerged as one of the trouble-shooters of
Africa’s economic revival. It has experience in 40 African countries,
primarily as a consultant in infrastructure development, and Africa
accounts for about half of its worldwide business....Peter Kieran, grew
up in Toronto and graduated from U of T, got his first African
experience in 1970 on a summer job in Tanzania while he was an MBA
student at HBS. Inspired by his Tanzania experience, he set up a
consulting company to work in developing countries. In 1996, he
purchased CPCS International, which had originally been established by
Canadian Pacific, and merged it with their own company, Hickling
Transcom. The company has specialized in railways and ports, seeking to
make them more commercial and privately financed.
Africa  Geoffrey_York  Nigeria  Lagos  transit  canadian  management_consulting  traffic_congestion  developing_countries 
may 2011 by jerryking
Big Food giants want to save us from junk food. Really. - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 25, 2011 Globe and Mail Eric Reguly

The potential problem with the food processors’ elevated interest in
farming is that, through sheer bulk, they can shape local economies and
environments in their favour. Strong demand for a single crop could lead
to the loss of crop diversity. Local regulations designed to protect
the public interest, such as non-privatized water supplies, could be
compromised, particularly in developing countries with weak governments.
And Big Food could use its clout with farmers and retailers to displace
locally grown foods with its own processed foods.

Big Food is going to get bigger as it exploits every inch of the value
chain, from farm to pharmacy.
Nestlé  Kraft  Coca-Cola  food  Eric_Reguly  Pepsi  farming  agriculture  Big_Food  developing_countries 
february 2011 by jerryking
Gift to Teach Business to Third-World Women - New York Times
March 6, 2008 | NYT | By STEPHANIE STROM. Goldman Sachs
& Company will donate $100 million to give at least 10,000 women a
business education and, more broadly, to develop and enhance business
education programs at universities in Africa, the Middle East and other
developing regions...Mr. Blankfein said investing in educating women in
the developing world for managerial roles and in building educational
programs to develop business expertise and talent would benefit the
economies of the countries where Goldman’s money will be spent, and that
would be to the firm’s benefit. Goldman follows economic growth around
the world, Mr. Blankfein said, “but also we try to create it, because
that’s how our bread gets buttered as a business.”
3rdWorld  business_education  charities  female  Goldman_Sachs  Lloyd_Blankfein  philanthropy  women  developing_countries 
december 2010 by jerryking
More Wealthy Investors Investing Abroad - NYTimes.com
November 19, 2010 | New York Times| By PAUL SULLIVAN.
Well-heeled American investors have been doing something lately that
they resisted for decades — becoming more like their European, Asian and
Latin American counterparts and substantially diversifying their
portfolios outside their home country. DOWNSIDE The biggest risk is
uncertainty, followed by a lack of knowledge. No one knows exactly what
is going to happen, and there are always investors who rush in too
quickly without fully understanding the risks. Those risks run the gamut
from income inequality that could create unrest, to legal systems that
have not been tested by foreign investors, to managers abroad without
established track records. There is also the unforeseen. “I witnessed
firsthand the collapse of the Soviet Union,” said Mr. Lucken, a former
foreign service officer. “That speaks to the unique political risks in
smaller developing countries.”
high_net_worth  investing  investments  investors  uncertainty  diversification  emerging_markets  wealth_management  risks  LDCs  political_risk  developing_countries 
november 2010 by jerryking
Vijay Govindarajan Pins Future Growth on Reverse Innovation
October 6, 2009 | — World Business Forum — Presented by Shell |
Vijay GovindarajanTo tap opportunities in emerging markets, companies
must excel at “reverse innovation”: develop products in countries like
China and India and then distribute them globally. Why? The fundamental
driver of reverse innovation is the income gap that exists between
emerging markets and the developed countries....Established automakers
are missing the opportunity. They have chartered their innovation
efforts for rich countries — and then offered the same cars, perhaps
de-featured to reduce costs somewhat, in poor countries....Yet far more
is at risk than missed opportunities for growth. Increasingly, success
in the developing world is a prerequisite to continued vitality at home.
In the transformed economic landscape, reverse innovation is not
optional — it is oxygen.
reverse_innovation  gurus  Vijay_Govindarajan  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  product_development  China  India  missed_opportunities  de-featured  automotive_industry  emerging_markets  developed_countries  jugaad  developing_countries 
may 2010 by jerryking
Corruption You Can Count On --- Crooked governments don't inevitably kill an economy; Trouble emerges when the rules of the game are unpredictable
3 April 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By Raymond Fisman.
Raymond Fisman is professor of economics and director of the Social
Enterprise Program at the Columbia Business School. He is author, with
Edward Miguel, of "Economic Gangsters."
corruption  economic_development  LDCs  Zimbabwe  China  Suharto  Indonesia  developing_countries  rules_of_the_game  unpredictability 
april 2010 by jerryking
Choosing Climate-Friendly Insurance
January 29, 2010| - National Geographic's Green
Guide|-Christine Dell'Amore. And then there's insurance that covers the
impacts of climate change, such as extreme weather events.
Micro-insurance for low-income customers that don't have access to
traditional insurance now covers about seven million people, according
to the report. This type of coverage--which was a focus of the
Copenhagen climate conference in December--is especially needed in
developing countries where food and water shortages are severe.
insurance  weather  low-income  microfinance  developing_countries  extreme_weather_events  climate_change 
january 2010 by jerryking
In Small Steps, New Approaches to Managing Disaster - NYTimes.com
January 18, 2010 | New York Times | by HENRY FOUNTAIN. There
are new innovative approaches being reviewed to building or rebuilding
infrastructure in developing countries, to help forestall disasters or
to recover from one. Among them are new ideas and projects to supply
quality housing, clean water, proper waste treatment and affordable
energy, in addition to health care. Pass to Engineers Without Borders
disasters  infrastructure  relief_recovery_reconstruction  developing_countries 
january 2010 by jerryking
Tech's Future
SEPTEMBER 27, 2004 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm. Developing
countries require new business strategies as well as new products. .. A
new class of businesses -- tech kiosk operators -- is emerging to
provide computing as a service. With cash often in short supply,
pay-as-you-go programs are not only boosting cell-phone usage but are
catching on with computers and Web access as well. When these
technologies cycle back into the mature markets, it could change
everything from pricing to product design. To succeed in the developing
world, devices and software have to be better in many ways: cheaper,
easier to use, extra-durable, more compact -- and still packed with
powerful features. The resulting improvements will ultimately benefit
everybody from New Delhi to New York.
HP  BRIC  C.K._Prahalad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  kiosks  new_businesses  new_products  pay-as-you-go  developing_countries 
december 2009 by jerryking
A whole new mind: why right-brainers ... - Google Books
Excerpt from 'A whole new mind: why right-brainers will rule
the future' By Daniel H. Pink. "Indeed, one of design's most potent
economic effects is this very capacity to create new markets... The
forces of Abundance, Asia, and Automation turn goods and services into
commodities so quickly that the only way to survive is by constantly
developing new innovations, inventing new categories, and (in Paola
Antonelli's lovely phrase) giving the world something it didn't know it
was missing.
============================================

See also Tom Friedman's piece ("We Need a Second Party" - NYTimes.com ) below:

The first is responding to the challenges and opportunities of an era in which globalization and the information technology revolution have dramatically intensified, creating a hyperconnected world. This is a world in which education, innovation and talent will be rewarded more than ever. This is a world in which there will be no more “developed” and “developing countries,” but only HIEs (high-imagination-enabling countries) and LIEs (low-imagination-enabling countries). Adding "imagination"
design  Daniel_Pink  innovation  storytelling  symphony  empathy  play  meaning  sense-making  new_businesses  new_categories  automation  abundance  Asia  developing_countries  imagination  Tom_Friedman  high-touch  special_sauce  skills  developed_countries 
october 2009 by jerryking
Profiting From Sustainable Management in Developing Countries - WSJ.com
JUNE 22, 2009 | Wall street Journal | by  LUTZ KAUFMANN , FELIX REIMANN, Matthias Ehrgott and JOHAN RAUER.
sustainability  developing_countries 
june 2009 by jerryking
Smaller, Smarter - WSJ.com
Feb. 11, 2008 WSJ article by Guy Chazan on product ideas that
supply light and power to remote areas of less developed countries
(LDCs). Some of the power-generation approaches are "off-grid".
off-grid  LDCs  energy  policy  UNDP  alternative_energy  3rdWorld  ideas  power_generation  size  developing_countries 
february 2009 by jerryking

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