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Opinion | Mike Pompeo: Last in His Class at West Point in Integrity
Nov. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Thomas L. Friedman

....Pompeo has just violated one of the cardinal rules of American military ethics and command: You look out for your soldiers, you don’t leave your wounded on the battlefield and you certainly don’t stand mute when you know a junior officer is being railroaded by a more senior commander, if not outright shot in her back.........Pompeo instead let his ambassador to Ukraine — who depended on him for protection — be stabbed in her back with a Twitter knife, wielded by the president, rather than tell Trump: “Sorry, Mr. President, if you fire her, I will resign. Because to do otherwise would be unjust and against my values and character — and because I would lose the loyalty of all my diplomats if I silently went along with such a travesty of justice against a distinguished 33-year veteran of the foreign service.”............“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, but lose his soul?” — Mark 8:36......As two now retired, longtime State Department diplomats, Aaron David Miller and Richard Sokolsky, wrote on CNN.com on Saturday, “At the very least, Pompeo enabled the smear campaign to go unchallenged, acquiesced in the Giuliani back-channel effort with Ukraine and failed to say a word in defense of Bill Taylor, George Kent or Marie Yovanovitch. These are breathtaking acts of craven political cowardice and beneath the dignity of any secretary of state.”

Mike Pompeo: Last in his class at West Point on ethics in leadership.........Reporters and columnists need to ask Pompeo every chance they get: “What moral code are you operating by that would justify such behavior?’’.....it’s now clear that Pompeo had not taken an oath to defend and protect the Constitution. He took an oath to defend and protect Donald J. Trump and Pompeo’s own future political career — above all else — and that’s exactly what he’s been doing. Shame on him.
character_traits  conspiracies  cowardice  diplomacy  disinformation  Donald_Trump  ethics  integrity  leadership  Michael_Pompeo  moral_codes  political_expediency  scriptures  Tom_Friedman  Ukraine  U.S._State_Department  U.S.foreign_policy  values  West_Point 
november 2019 by jerryking
Ottawa is on the wrong side of Chinese power
January 15, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | JOHN IBBITSON.

Is there a way Canada could have avoided acting on an extradition request of the United States – employing the “creative incompetence” that former Liberal foreign minister John Manley said might have prevented the detention of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou? She is the daughter of Huawei’s founder, and Chinese anger at her detention is fierce and real.

“I’m with John Manley that we could have creatively avoided our responsibilities,” said Lynette Ong, a political scientist at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Canada could manage American anger at letting Ms. Meng slip away more easily than it is managing China’s anger over her detention, Prof. Ong believes.

Did Canadian officials in Ottawa miss an opportunity to de-escalate the conflict through quiet diplomacy, rather than ratcheting up the rhetoric over what appeared to be the retaliatory detention of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor? Should they have foreseen that the Chinese might further retaliate by increasing the punishment of convicted drug trafficker Robert Schellenberg from 15 years to a sentence of death? How much of this is Donald Trump’s fault?

Or was none of this preventable?....So, what next?....The government obviously cannot interfere with the judicial process that will determine whether Ms. Meng is extradited to the United States. Nor can Mr. Trudeau attempt to resolve the situation by direct talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping, ....A successful conclusion to Sino-American trade talks might calm things down......Ong urges Mr. Trudeau to put down his public megaphone, and to focus on “quiet diplomacy behind the scenes.”.......There is another, deeper, concern. For at least two decades, Liberal and Conservative governments have concentrated more and more decision-making in foreign affairs in the Office of the Prime Minister. Global Affairs Canada may no longer have the capacity it once had to manage critical files, and political advisers to Ms. Freeland and Mr. Trudeau may be out of their depth, missing subtle signals and opportunities to reduce tensions between Ottawa and Beijing.
5G  Canada  China  China_rising  Canada-China_relations  Chrystia_Freeland  crossborder  foreign_policy  Huawei  John_Ibbitson  John_Manley  Liberals  Meng_Wanzhou  political_staffers  Xi_Jinping  Justin_Trudeau  diplomacy  PMO  reprisals 
january 2019 by jerryking
What Comes After Acheson’s Creation? - WSJ
By PEGGY NOONAN
Feb. 9, 2017

The U.S. military needs to know what the U.S. government seeks from it. The White House need to communicate an overarching plan because if there’s no higher plan they, in turn, can’t make plans to meet the plan.....like tornado victims, those interested in foreign policy have been [shellshocked]—staring in shock at the wreckage of the post-War II international system.

But something has to be rebuilt. Everyone now has to be an architect, or a cement-pourer, or a master craftsman carpenter.

It’s been instructive the past week to reread a small classic of statecraft, “Present at the Creation” by Dean Acheson, published in 1969. As undersecretary and then secretary of state he was involved in the creation of the postwar order.

What is inspiring about Acheson’s first-rate second-rateness is that he’s like a lot of those we have developing foreign policy right now.

Acheson, though he did not present it this way, provides useful lessons for future diplomats in future crises.

• Everyone’s in the dark looking for the switch.
• Don’t mess things up at the beginning.
• Be able to see your work soberly. Keep notes so history will know what happened.
• Cheer up. Good things can come of bad times, great things from fiercely imperfect individuals.
• Even though you’ll wind up disappointed. All diplomats in the end feel frustrated over missed opportunities and achievements that slipped away. “Alas, that is life. We cannot live our dreams.”

Still to be answered: What is America’s strategy now—our overarching vision, our big theme and intent? What are the priorities? How, now, to navigate the world?

That soldier needs an answer to his question: What do you need from us? What’s the plan?
questions  U.S.foreign_policy  post-WWII  diplomacy  Dean_Acheson  Marshall_Plan  Peggy_Noonan  priorities  change  statecraft  books  Cold_War  international_system  rebuilding  dislocations  The_Establishment  crisis  crisis_management  Communicating_&_Connecting  grand_strategy  statesmen  imperfections  U.S._military  note_taking  missed_opportunities 
february 2017 by jerryking
What Can the Next President Do About Russia? - WSJ
By ROBERT D. KAPLAN
Updated Oct. 16, 2016

Of the two great autocratic powers in Eurasia, Russia is emerging as a greater short-term threat than China. The Chinese hope to gradually dominate the waters off the Asian mainland without getting into a shooting war with the U.S. Yet while Beijing’s aggression is cool, Moscow’s is hot....Russia’s economic situation is much worse than China’s, and so the incentive of its leaders to dial up nationalism is that much greater. But the larger factor, one that Western elites have trouble understanding, cannot be quantified: A deeply embedded sense of historical insecurity makes Russian aggression crude, brazen, bloodthirsty and risk-prone. ....How does the U.S. build leverage on the ground, from the Baltic Sea to the Syrian desert, that puts America in a position where negotiations with Russia can make a strategic difference?....

For without the proper geopolitical context, the secretary of state is a missionary, not a diplomat. ...In the cyber domain the U.S. has not sufficiently drawn red lines. What kind of Russian hacking will result in either a proportionate, or even disproportionate, punitive response? The Obama administration seems to be proceeding ad hoc, as it has done with Russia policy in general. The next administration, along with projecting military force throughout the Russian near abroad, will have to project force in cyberspace, too.
Russia  Vladimir_Putin  Robert_Kaplan  threats  deterrence  nationalism  Baltics  NATO  U.S.foreign_policy  leverage  geopolitics  log_rolling  diplomacy  realism  balance_of_power  realpolitik  cyber_warfare  autocracies  insecurity  hacking  maritime  punitive  retribution  retaliation  South_China_Sea  ad_hoc  red_lines  China  autocrats 
october 2016 by jerryking
China’s foreign minister demanded meeting with Justin Trudeau - The Globe and Mail
NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE AND ROBERT FIFE
BEIJING and OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 02, 2016

In Ottawa on Wednesday, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi lashed out angrily at a reporter’s question that mirrored Canadians’ concerns about human rights and China’s seizing of disputed regions of the South China Sea. His fiery response revealed the difficulty Chinese diplomats have in convincingly representing their government’s position.

The journalist specifically asked about China’s detention of a Canadian missionary on charges of espionage.
Justin_Trudeau  China  China_rising  diplomacy  foreign_policy  human_rights 
june 2016 by jerryking
Who speaks for Canada, spies or diplomats? - The Globe and Mail
PAUL HEINBECKER AND DANIEL LIVERMORE
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 29, 2015
Canada  CSE  CSIS  security_&_intelligence  diplomacy 
june 2015 by jerryking
Ottawa’s diplomatic approach to China naive, says former ambassador - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 02 2015

In his coming book, Middle Power, Middle Kingdom, Mr. Mulroney takes issue with the federal government’s cultivation of the ambassador and his close working rapport with political staffers in the foreign affairs department.
diplomacy  China  books  John_Baird  foreign_policy  naivete  middle-powers 
march 2015 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors  digital_diplomacy  surveillance_state 
february 2015 by jerryking
Lois Rae was the wife of a diplomat, mother of a premier - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN FERRIER MACKAY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 28 2014
obituaries  Bob_Rae  inspiration  diplomacy  women 
december 2014 by jerryking
The Grand Strategy Obama Needs
SEPT. 10, 2014 | NYTimes.com | Vali R. Nasr.

What’s missing is a grand strategy — a road map not just for managing two crises but for ending them....But Eisenhower had a larger goal — not upsetting the delicate balance of power in the Cold War. Above all, he sought to avoid greater conflict, especially when he was trying to start arms control talks with Moscow.

In other words, he had a long-term global perspective.

By contrast, American policy today sees the world in fragments — ISIS in Iraq and Syria, Russia in Ukraine. But those crises have something important in common: Both trace to political fragmentation in weak states living within unsettled borders. That leaves those states prone to internal dissent, and America’s recent minimalist posture has given these brewing troubles room to explode into crises....American grand strategy should identify these weak countries before they turn on themselves; bolster their political mechanisms for living together in pluralism; declare our unyielding opposition to any outside forces that would seek to divide them. America’s military strength could assure the third part. The rest is work for our political and diplomatic experts.
Obama  Ukraine  strategy  geopolitics  '50s  Middle_East  Russia  strategic_thinking  nation_building  failed_states  long-term  weak_states  diplomacy  grand_strategy  roadmaps  Non-Integrating_Gap  Dwight_Eisenhower  crisis  Vali_Nasr 
september 2014 by jerryking
The Revolt of the Weak - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 1, 2014 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

there are certain unconscious habits and norms of restraint that undergird civilization. These habits and norms are now being challenged by a coalition of the unsuccessful.

What we’re seeing around the world is a revolt of the weak. There are certain weak movements and nations, beset by internal contradictions, that can’t compete if they play by the normal rules of civilization. Therefore, they are conspiring to blow up the rule book.....People who conduct foreign policy live today under the shadow of the postwar era. People instinctively understand that just after World War II, Harry Truman, George Marshall, Dean Acheson and others did something remarkable. They stepped outside the immediate crush of events and constructed a context in which people would live for the next several decades.

Some of the problems they faced did not seem gigantic: how to prevent a Communist insurgency from taking over a semi-failed government in Greece. But they understood that by projecting American power into Greece, they would be establishing certain norms and creating a framework for civilization.
Vladimir_Putin  Henry_Kissinger  George_Marshall  Harry_Truman  David_Brooks  ISIS  rogue_actors  U.S.foreign_policy  post-WWII  Dean_Acheson  diplomacy  asymmetrical  APNSA 
september 2014 by jerryking
Saving the System - NYTimes.com
APRIL 28, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.

“The ‘category error’ of our experts is to tell us that our system is doing just fine and proceeding on its eternal course toward ever-greater progress and global goodness. This is whistling past the graveyard.

“The lesson-category within grand strategic history is that when an established international system enters its phase of deterioration, many leaders nonetheless respond with insouciance, obliviousness, and self-congratulation. When the wolves of the world sense this, they, of course, will begin to make their moves to probe the ambiguities of the aging system and pick off choice pieces to devour at their leisure.

“This is what Putin is doing; this is what China has been moving toward doing in the maritime waters of Asia; this is what in the largest sense the upheavals of the Middle East are all about: i.e., who and what politico-ideological force will emerge as hegemon over the region in the new order to come. ....Today that system is under assault not by a single empire but by a hundred big and little foes. As Walter Russell Mead argues in a superb article in Foreign Affairs, geopolitics is back with a vengeance. Whether it’s Russia seizing Crimea or China asserting itself, old-fashioned power plays are back in vogue. Meanwhile, pre-modern movements and people try to eliminate ethnic and religious diversity in Egypt, Ukraine and beyond.

China, Russia and Iran have different values, but all oppose this system of liberal pluralism. The U.S. faces a death by a thousand cuts dilemma. No individual problem is worth devoting giant resources to. It’s not worth it to spend huge amounts of treasure to establish stability in Syria or defend a Western-oriented Ukraine. But, collectively, all the little problems can undermine the modern system. No individual ailment is worth the expense of treating it, but, collectively, they can kill you (JCK: Worst of all worlds).
authoritarianism  autocracies  category_errors  China  Colleges_&_Universities  Crimea  curriculum  David_Brooks  death_by_a_thousand_cuts  dilemmas  diplomacy  geopolitics  grand_strategy  insouciance  international_system  Iran  liberal_pluralism  multiple_stressors  obliviousness  power_plays  power_to_obstruct  rogue_actors  Russia  self-congratulatory  South_China_Sea  stratagems  strategic_thinking  strategy  Walter_Russell_Mead  worst_of_all_worlds  Yale 
april 2014 by jerryking
Spying not a shock to former Brazilian diplomat - The Globe and Mail
STEPHANIE NOLEN and COLIN FREEZE

RIO DE JANEIRO and TORONTO — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Oct. 18 2013
Brazil  Stephanie_Nolen  CSE  espionage  diplomacy 
december 2013 by jerryking
U.S. Directly Challenges China's Air Defense Zone - WSJ.com
Nov. 27, 2013 | WSJ | By Julian E. Barnes in Washington and Jeremy Page in Beijing

Beijing and Tokyo have competing claims to a group of islands in the East China Sea, and China moved over the weekend to solidify its standing by declaring the air-defense zone, which encompasses the disputed islands, requiring aircraft to report in before entering the zone.

The U.S. and key Asian allies, including Japan and South Korea, criticized the requirements as a power grab by Beijing, and the Pentagon vowed to show it wouldn't be bound by them.
Asia_Pacific  confrontations  provocations  maritime  security_&_intelligence  ASEAN  diplomacy  China  China_rising  PLA  U.S.foreign_policy  sovereignty  conflicts 
november 2013 by jerryking
Joe Clark’s new book: Canada is the country that ‘lectures and leaves’ - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 01 2013 | The Globe and Mail | CAMPBELL CLARK.

Our country, Mr. Clark argues in How We Lead: Canada in a Century of Change, should “lead from beside.”
foreign_policy  foreign_aid  diplomacy  Canada  Canadian  leadership  books  soft_power  Joe_Clark  NGOs  international_relations  Commonwealth 
november 2013 by jerryking
Canadian embassies eavesdrop, leak says - The Globe and Mail
COLIN FREEZE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29 2013

In 1995, former CSEC employee Mike Frost wrote in his memoir, Spyworld, that he set up “listening posts” at Canadian embassies. His book says CSEC signals intelligence technicians during the Cold War were funded and mentored by NSA counterparts who taught them how to conceal a piece of spy machinery inside what appeared to be an office safe.
CSE  sigint  security_&_intelligence  NSA  Five_Eyes  diplomacy  espionage  eavesdropping  books  memoirs 
october 2013 by jerryking
Asian countries demand answers over reports of spying from embassies
Oct. 31 2013 | The Globe and Mail |

A document from National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, published this week by German magazine Der Spiegel, describes a signals intelligence program called “Stateroom” in which U.S., British, Australian and Canadian embassies secretly house surveillance equipment to collect electronic communications. Those countries, along with New Zealand, have an intelligence-sharing agreement known as “Five Eyes.”
NSA  diplomacy  Asian  Australia  New_Zealand  Edward_Snowden  sigint  security_&_intelligence  Five_Eyes 
october 2013 by jerryking
‘Cyberwar’ allegations threaten rift between Brazil and Canada
Oct. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | STEPHANIE NOLEN, COLIN FREEZE AND STEVEN CHASE.
Martin Rudner, a former Carleton University professor, said Canadian defence ministers have spent decades directing CSEC to collect foreign intelligence – including intelligence acquired through economic espionage.

He said Brazil could be a long-term strategic target, given its emerging oil resources could potentially cut into the market for Alberta oil. Probing the Brazilian energy ministry’s data would be one way for Ottawa to figure out the scale of that economic threat, Mr. Rudner said.

According to the Fantastico exposé, CSEC may have been trying to hack into an encrypted government server in Brazil that hosts correspondence between government officials and corporations. “These are state conversations, government strategies which no one should be able to eavesdrop upon,” Brazilian Energy Minister Edison Lobao was quoted as saying.

The leaked documents – all stamped “CSEC – Advanced Network Tradecraft”– yield intriguing glances into the previously unexplored world of Canadian cyberespionage, a world where disparate bits of data are painstakingly amassed in hopes of seeing what happens on a given “target’s” smarthphone or e-mail chains.
espionage  CSE  Brazil  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Dilma_Rousseff  diplomacy  sigint  spycraft  Ottawa 
october 2013 by jerryking
Yossi Klein Halevi: A Lesson From the Yom Kippur War for a Perilous Time - WSJ.com
October 3, 2013 | WSJ | By YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI.
A Lesson From the Yom Kippur War for a Perilous Time
Golda Meir didn't strike pre-emptively in 1973 because she was 'scared' of angering the White House.
security_&_intelligence  Yom_Kippur_War  pre-emption  Israel  lessons_learned  Iran  diplomacy  Mideast_Peace  IDF  Egypt  Syria  war  militaries 
october 2013 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton’s Diplomatic Legacy
February 11, 2013 | The New Yorker | by George Packer.

The criticism that there is no encompassing “Obama doctrine” misses the point. Geopolitics today is too complex, messy, and various to be bent to America’s will by an overarching doctrine like containment, or a massive initiative like the Marshall Plan, or a single breakthrough like Nixon’s trip to China. A doctrine was what put the country in a deep hole; climbing out required restraint, flexibility, and opportunism. A first-term Secretary of State with one grand strategic vision wouldn’t have matched the demands of the moment, which called for a fox, not a hedgehog....The standard debates in American foreign policy—realism vs. idealism, heavy footprint vs. light footprint—don’t get to the heart of the problem with Obama’s foreign policy. It’s not that diplomatic engagement is the wrong approach; it’s just that the President’s first four years have given us the idea of diplomacy more than the thing itself. In a forthcoming book, “The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat,” Vali Nasr, a former adviser under Hillary Clinton and the late Richard Holbrooke, argues that, from North Africa to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the White House has relied too much on the military and the C.I.A. (mainly in the form of drones) to guide policy: “These agencies’ solutions were not, and could never be, a substitute for the type of patient, long-range, credible diplomacy that garners the respect of our allies and their support when we need it.” In Nasr’s view, a White House that feared being called soft and wanted to keep intractable foreign entanglements out of the news turned to Clinton only after things had fallen apart, as in Pakistan at the end of 2011, when she moved to repair a relationship that had degenerated into outright antagonism.

Obama and Clinton wanted to “pivot” away from the Middle East, toward the Pacific, but a bloody hand keeps reaching out to pull America back.
George_Packer  George_Marshall  U.S.foreign_policy  legacies  diplomacy  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Obama  Hillary_Clinton  geopolitics  Pakistan  complexity  messiness  restraint  flexibility  opportunism  U.S._State_Department  grand_strategy  Vali_Nasr  CIA  drones  Marshall_Plan  foxes  hedgehogs  long-range  books 
february 2013 by jerryking
Cut off Iran? It’s about time - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 11 2012,
Margaret_Wente  Iran  Canada  diplomacy 
september 2012 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton’s Last Tour as a Rock-Star Diplomat - NYTimes.com
By STEVEN LEE MYERS
Published: June 27, 2012

rld.

Clinton dismissed this when I asked her about it in an interview in her large office on the seventh floor of the State Department. She started by noting that NATO and the military alliances with Japan and South Korea have been bedrocks of national security through every Republican and Democratic administration since World War II. In “21st-century statecraft,” though, “the general understanding, which cuts across parties, is that the United States can’t solve all of the problems in the world,” she said. “But the problems in the world can’t be solved without the United States. And therefore, we have to husband our resources, among which is this incredibly valuable asset of global leadership, and figure out how we can best deploy it.” She cited the role of the Arab League — once marginal and mostly dysfunctional — in forging international consensus for the intervention in Libya. “The Arab League was not prepared to work with NATO, work with the United States,” she explained of nudging others to the forefront of international action. “But we’ve worked very hard, and I certainly have worked hard, to create an openness to that, and I think it’s in America’s interest.”
diplomacy  U.S.foreign_policy  Hillary_Clinton  indispensable  superpowers  21st._century  statecraft  alliances  NATO 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Sunshine Warrior - NYTimes.com
By BILL KELLER September 22, 2002

His inclination to act derives, too, from his analytical style, a residue, perhaps, of the mathematician he started out to be. In almost any discussion, he tends to be the one focusing on the most often overlooked variable in decision making, the cost of not acting. ....the tensions between State and Defense are rooted in starkly different views of how America should deal with the world. The State Department tends to see the world as a set of problems to be handled, using the tools of professional diplomacy and striving for international consensus. This Defense Department tends to define leadership as more (in the Pentagon's favorite buzzword of the moment) ''forward leaning,'' including a willingness to act unilaterally if need be and to employ muscle. Rumsfeld and Cheney, who have been friends since the Nixon administration, are visceral advocates of this more assertive view, but Wolfowitz is its theorist -- its Kissinger, as one admirer put it. ...Dennis Ross went to work for Wolfowitz shortly after writing a paper trashing the work of Team B. ''What I always found in him that separated him from everybody else on that side of the political spectrum is not that he didn't have predispositions, but that he was much more open, much more intellectually open, to different kinds of interpretations,'' Ross says....''In the end, it has to come down to a careful weighing of things we can't know with precision, the costs of action versus the costs of inaction, the costs of action now versus the costs of action later.''
U.S._military  leadership  leadership_development  U.S._Army  military_academies  red_teams  Dennis_Ross  Paul_Wolfowitz  cost_of_inaction  Pentagon  U.S._State_Department  diplomacy  consensus  interpretation 
may 2012 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Zbigniew Brzezinski
January 13, 2012 | FT.com | By Edward Luce.

Strategic Vision: America and the Crisis of Global Power.

“We [Americans] are too obsessed with today,” Brzezinski continues. “If we slide into a pattern of just thinking about today, we’ll end up reacting to yesterday instead of shaping something more constructive in the world.” By contrast, he says, the Chinese are thinking decades ahead. Alas, Brzezinski says, Obama has so far failed to move into a strategic habit of mind. To a far greater extent than the Chinese, he concedes, Obama has to respond to shifts in public mood. Brzezinski is not very complimentary about American public opinion.

“Americans don’t learn about the world, they don’t study world history, other than American history in a very one-sided fashion, and they don’t study geography,” Brzezinski says. “In that context of widespread ignorance, the ongoing and deliberately fanned fear about the outside world, which is connected with this grandiose war on jihadi terrorism, makes the American public extremely susceptible to extremist appeals.” But surely most Americans are tired of overseas adventures, I say. “There is more scepticism,” Brzezinski concedes. “But the susceptibility to demagoguery is still there.”....Brzezinski lists "Ignorance", as one of America’s six “key vulnerabilities” alongside “mounting debt’, a “flawed financial system”, “decaying national infrastructure”, “widening income inequality”, and “increasingly gridlocked politics”.
Zbigniew_Brzezinski  security_&_intelligence  strategic_thinking  China_rising  China  diplomacy  princelings  America_in_Decline?  threats  vulnerabilities  infrastructure  income_inequality  debt  political_polarization  long-term  partisan_politics  fractured_internally  NSC  ignorance  public_opinion  books  Chinese  instant_gratification  demagoguery  APNSA  gridlocked_politics  Edward_Luce  incurious  financial_system  historical_amnesia 
january 2012 by jerryking
Canada needs a foreign affairs culture - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN

irvin studin
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 04, 2012

The core of the foreign policy and larger international affairs debate in Canada should not be about the ends we may wish to pursue as a collective, but rather about the means necessary to advance the ends legitimately chosen by any elected government. The desired ends will clearly change according to the times and government, but the means to success for Canada are stable and undifferentiated, and they need to be built up.

Without this reversal of strategic logic (means before ends, rather than ends dictating means), we Canadians are left talking to ourselves about problems in the world we're interested in but typically incapable of solving – for lack of the requisite means to do so.......So what's the nature of the "means" debate that Canada needs to have to be a major (and credible) global player this century? Two interrelated "means" levers need to be addressed: national culture and national capabilities. A country that's serious about advancing ambitious ends in the world – defending minority religions or, say, brokering peace and transforming impoverished countries, or even fighting a just war – requires a public culture that can properly assess happenings beyond North America, and can support sustained engagement by Canada beyond our borders. More concretely, it needs the practical capabilities to advance these ends: talent (in key positions), assets (intelligence, military, diplomatic), money and, to be sure, differentiated relationships with players in the world.

To be a leader not only in the Americas but also in the world, Canada needs more foreign affairs culture, and certainly more capabilities. We might start by creating that army of Spanish and Portuguese speakers that the federal government surely requires to advance its stated ends. Let's add some Mandarin and Arabic speakers for good measure.

None of this is possible without a brave political leadership that applies pressure over time to build the culture and capabilities today that will allow us to score major foreign policy achievements in the long term.
Canada  Canadian  capabilities  capacity-building  diplomacy  foreign_policy  leadership  resources  technology 
january 2012 by jerryking
Zbigniew Brzezinski: As China Rises, A New U.S. Strategy - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 14, 2011 | WSJ |By ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI.

We should embrace Russia, Japan and South Korea as we seek to manage the rise of China.
strategy  strategic_thinking  diplomacy  geopolitics  China_rising  China  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S.-China_relations  NSC  APNSA 
december 2011 by jerryking
A New Era of Gunboat Diplomacy - NYTimes.com
By MARK LANDLER
Published: November 12, 2011

For all its echoes of the 1800s, not to mention the cold war, the showdown in the South China Sea augurs a new type of maritime conflict — one that is playing out from the Mediterranean Sea to the Arctic Ocean, where fuel-hungry economic powers, newly accessible undersea energy riches and even changes in the earth’s climate are conspiring to create a 21st-century contest for the seas.

China is not alone in its maritime ambitions. Turkey has clashed with Cyprus and stoked tensions with Greece and Israel over natural-gas fields that lie under the eastern Mediterranean. Several powers, including Russia, Canada and the United States, are eagerly circling the Arctic, where melting polar ice is opening up new shipping routes and the tantalizing possibility of vast oil and gas deposits beneath.

“This hunt for resources is going to consume large bodies of water around the world for at least the next couple of decades,
pacific  Artic  maritime  diplomacy  China  South_China_Sea 
november 2011 by jerryking
We must restore our diplomatic core - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 08, 2011 |G&M |ALLAN GOTLIEB & COLIN ROBERTSON.
Mr. Harper seems to foresee a highly active foreign policy, & a very
independent one. “We also have a purpose,” he said.“And that purpose is
no longer just to go along and get along with everyone else’s
agenda.”..Negotiating a new accord with the US to reverse the hardening
of our border, protecting the access of energy exports to US mkts,
creating new mkts for our oil sands, negotiating a free-trade deal with
the EU & India, strengthening relations with China, protecting Cdn.
interests in the Arctic ...In this age of the Internet & WikiLeaks,
the role of diplomacy needs to be assessed & understood. The PM
should commission a task force on the foreign service, as he did for
Afghan. It’s been > 30 yrs. since the McDougall Commission looked at
our diplomats. There will be no new golden age of Canadian foreign
policy w/o investing in the HR that, in the PM’s words, are necessary
“to making Canada a meaningful contributor in the world.”
capacity-building  Stephen_Harper  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  globalization  diplomacy  rebuilding  WikiLeaks  golden_age 
august 2011 by jerryking
Track II Diplomacy: A Short History
JULY/AUGUST 2011 | Foreign Policy | BY CHARLES HOMANS |
diplomacy  political_psychology 
july 2011 by jerryking
Obama’s Peace Tack Contrasts With Key Aide, Friend of Israel - NYTimes.com
By HELENE COOPER and MARK LANDLER
Published: May 21, 2011

Dennis Ross is the most senior member of a coterie of American diplomats
who have advised presidents stretching back to Ronald Reagan. Unlike
many of his colleagues, Mr. Ross has thrived in Republican and
Democratic administrations.

“Dennis is viewed as the éminence grise, a sort of Rasputin who casts a
spell over secretaries of state and presidents,” said Aaron David
Miller, a Middle East expert who has worked with him over several
administrations and says he is an admirer. “But in the end, it’s the
president who makes the ultimate decisions.”

Denis R. McDonough, the deputy national security adviser, said: “Dennis
brings to the discussion a recognition of the vital importance of peace
to the parties, but also to the United States. He’s in many ways
dedicated much of his professional life to getting there.”
Dennis_Ross  obama  Mideast_Peace  King_Addullah_II  Palestinians  diplomacy  éminence_grise  Middle_East 
may 2011 by jerryking
Henry Kissinger talks to Simon Schama
May 20 2011 | FT.com / FT Magazine | By Simon Schama. What
Kissinger took from Elliott was that without grasping the long arc of
time, any account of politics and government would be shallow and
self-defeating....And you get the feeling that Kissinger believes that
it would do them no harm if they did. Instead he laments that
“contemporary politicians have very little sense of history. For them
the Vietnam war is unimaginably far behind us, the Korean war has no
relevance any more,” even though that conflict is very far from over and
at any minute has the capability of going from cold to hot. “This [the
United States of Amnesia as Gore Vidal likes to call it],” he sighs, “is
a tremendous handicap … when I talk to policy­makers and I cite some
historical analogy they think, ‘There he goes again with his history.’”

Look too at `A World Restored', “ The Brothers Karamazov.”
Simon_Schama  Henry_Kissinger  Kissinger_Associates  recency_bias  statesmen  historical_amnesia  history  diplomacy  books  analogies  self-defeating  ignorance  APNSA 
may 2011 by jerryking
Book Review: On China - WSJ.com
MAY 12, 2011
A Diplomat Looks East
Will Beijing continue to pursue a policy of 'peaceful rise' or become a more belligerent player on the world stage?
By BRET STEPHENS
china  Bret_Stephens  Henry_Kissinger  book_reviews  diplomacy  APNSA  world_stage 
may 2011 by jerryking
Book Review - Bismarck - By Jonathan Steinberg - NYTimes.com
By HENRY A. KISSINGER
Published: March 31, 2011

BISMARCK

A Life

By Jonathan Steinberg

Illustrated. 577 pp. Oxford University Press. $34.95
Henry_Kissinger  Prussian  diplomacy  excerpts  statesmen  Germany  book_reviews  APNSA 
april 2011 by jerryking
The lessons of Richard Holbrooke | Chrystia Freeland | Analysis & Opinion | Reuters.com
Chrystia Freeland
» See all analysis and opinion
The lessons of Richard Holbrooke
Dec 17, 2010 09:24 EST
Richard_Holbrooke  obituaries  diplomacy  Chrystia_Freeland  statesmen 
march 2011 by jerryking
For U.S. foreign policy, it should be all about the economy - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 03, 2010 |G&M| CHRYSTIA FREELAND. The most
significant revelation from WikiLeaks isn’t what is in the documents –
it`s what is missing from them. The financial crisis of 2008, and its
agonizing aftermath, changed the world profoundly. It didn’t change the
State Dept. The most important take-away from the Wikileaks is that the
U.S. needs a new foreign policy paradigm to deal with the post-crisis
world. The starting pt. for that paradigm must be to put the economy at
the heart of foreign policy. Some of the savviest wise men in the U.S.
are making that pt., in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs, with two
essays on the importance of the economy for statecraft.....The country
needs a new paradigm because: (1) it has run out of $ to be the world’s
police officer; (2) the recession requires everyone – including
diplomats – to pitch in to put the country back to work; and (3)
national security & int. relations – the classic concerns of
diplomacy – are now driven by economic concerns.
foreign_policy  Chrystia_Freeland  U.S.foreign_policy  economy  economic_policy  WikiLeaks  diplomacy  statecraft 
december 2010 by jerryking
WikiLeaks: Unpluggable
Dec 2nd 2010 | The Economist. It would be an exaggeration to
say that diplomacy will never be the same again. Self-interest means that countries will still send & receive private msgs. But communication will be more difficult. The trading of opinions, insights & favours necessarily requires shadow, not light. Unofficial contacts such as businessmen, journalists, campaigners & other citizens who talk to American diplomats, out of goodwill or self-interest, will think twice about doing so. Being tarred as an American crony can be lethal. What is said will be less clear & interesting. Principals will use go-betweens rather than talking directly. Clear private speech will give way to euphemisms suitable for public consumption. (e.g. “convivial” for “drunk”; “unconventional” for “mad”.) All that will make communication more difficult. ...In the
longer term the odds are stacked against secrecy...America’s need to share colossal amounts of data across a sprawling govt. machine.
WikiLeaks  diplomacy  Communicating_&_Connecting  security_&_intelligence  confidentiality  self-censorship  self-interest  opacity  private_information 
december 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - Taking On China - NYTimes.com
September 30, 2010 | New York Times | By PAUL KRUGMAN.
Serious people, appalled by the specter of Congress legislating for
sanctions against China over its currency policy, might believe that the
U.S. would be better off pursuing quiet diplomacy. Diplomacy on
China’s currency has gone nowhere, and will continue going nowhere
unless backed by the threat of retaliation. The hype about trade war is
unjustified — and, anyway, there are worse things than trade conflict.
In a time of mass unemployment, made worse by China’s predatory currency
policy, the possibility of a few new tariffs should be way down on our
list of worries.
China  currencies  Paul_Krugman  predatory_practices  diplomacy  trade_wars  protectionism 
october 2010 by jerryking
Where are the Kissingers for the 21st century?
Feb. 26. 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Jeremi Suri. At
its core, leadership is about connections and calculated risk-taking.
Mr. Kissinger excelled at both. He was a big-picture thinker who drew
actively on the work of people with diverse areas of expertise. Mr.
Kissinger might not have done the original research, but he knew how to
identify and exploit valuable new knowledge. In the decades after the
Second World War, Mr. Kissinger guided policy-makers in their responses
to the challenges of postwar reconstruction, communist containment, the
nuclear arms race, limited warfare, Third World revolutions and détente.
Henry_Kissinger  career_paths  leadership  risk-taking  the_big_picture  Communicating_&_Connecting  humanities  realpolitik  21st._century  statesmen  diplomacy  strategic_thinking  grand_strategy  APNSA 
march 2010 by jerryking
It's time to build a better diplomat - The Globe and Mail
Daryl Copeland

From Tuesday's Globe and Mail Published on Monday, Nov. 30, 2009
NPSIA  diplomacy  training  Canadian 
december 2009 by jerryking
When No Means No - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 4, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | op-ed by Bret Stephens on Iranian intransigence.
Iran  Obama  nuclear  negotiations  diplomacy  Bret_Stephens 
november 2009 by jerryking
Gordon Crovitz: Diplomacy in the Age of No Secrets - WSJ.com
* AUGUST 30, 2009, 7:07 P.M. ET

Diplomacy in the Age of No Secrets
Today's quiet deal could be tomorrow's headline.

*
By L. GORDON CROVITZ
L._Gordon_Crovtiz  diplomacy 
september 2009 by jerryking
Mideast Peace Can Start With a Land Swap - WSJ.com
JUNE 16, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | DAVID MAKOVSKY. It's time to take the settlement issue off the table.By
Mideast_Peace  land  swaps  Israel  diplomacy  APNSA 
june 2009 by jerryking
Ernest May, International Relations Expert, Dies at 80 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com
By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: June 6, 2009

Thinking in Time--great book

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes"
Harvard  geopolitics  U.S.foreign_policy  diplomacy  obituaries  writers  decision_making  historians 
june 2009 by jerryking
Economy Fuels Brazil's Ambitions Beyond South America - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 6, 2009 | WSJ | by JOHN LYONS. Article on the
increasingly important diplomatic and economic role Brazil is playing in
Latin America.
diplomacy  ideas  Brazil  Latin_America 
february 2009 by jerryking
Green Diplomacy - WSJ.com
March 24, 2008 WSJ article by Joel Sherwood profiling U.S.
Ambassador to Sweden, Michael Wood, and his role assisting Swedish alt.
energy companies raise cash in the US.
alternative_energy  diplomacy  green  policy  environment  indispensable 
february 2009 by jerryking

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