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jerryking : disadvantages   12

We pay a high economic price for a society of exclusion - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 08, 2016 |The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.

If citizens are excluded from meaningful involvement in their economic systems, policy solutions (e.g. A tax cut here, an infrastructure program there) none of it matters.....Donald Trump has tapped into a vein of discontent that isn’t going away, whether he wins the White House or not. Those disenfranchised from mainstream politics are connecting with Mr. Trump’s childish messages.....The common thread in protest movements like Occupy Wall Street and Idle No More is that people who are excluded from the mainstream economic and political systems that run a country are disconnected and their disconnection erodes the social and political stability-- the basic building blocks on which successful economies are built. ... If people lose faith in governments, if they become so hopeless about finding a way to achieve and succeed in the system, the system itself will start to collapse.

And following that will be an outflow of capital investment, entrepreneurial energy and intellectual might. Money, businesses and educated people – if they start pouring out, the economy doesn’t stand a chance.
aboriginals  capital_flows  civil_disobedience  covenants  disenfranchisement  disadvantages  Donald_Trump  economists  exclusion  policy  social_fabric  Idle_No_More  marginalization  social_cohesion  social_collaboration  patriotism  instability  Occupy_Wall_Street  talent_flows  hopelessness  protest_movements  social_integration  Todd_Hirsch 
april 2016 by jerryking
‘A National Admissions Office’ for Low-Income Strivers - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 16, 2014 | NYT | David Leonhardt.

QuestBridge has figured out how to convince thousands of high-achieving, low-income students that they really can attend a top college. “It’s like a national admissions office,” said Catharine Bond Hill, the president of Vassar.

The growth of QuestBridge has broader lessons for higher education — and for closing the yawning achievement gap between rich and poor teenagers. That gap is one of the biggest reasons that moving up the economic ladder is so hard in the United States today.

the larger lessons of QuestBridge are so important.

What are they? One, the complexity of the financial-aid process is scaring students away from college.

Two, large amounts of well-meaning scholarship money — from private sources as well as from Washington and state governments — is fairly ineffectual. .

Three, not every problem created by inequality is fiendishly difficult to solve.
Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  movingonup  QuestBridge  students  disadvantages  elitism  strivers  low-income  high-achieving 
september 2014 by jerryking
Want the job? You need to play the hiring game - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 06 2013,

If you are sending a résumé to a database, without the benefit of a relationship with the hiring manager, you are already at a distinct disadvantage.
Managing_Your_Career  résumés  hiring  job_search  personal_branding  personal_relationships  applicant-tracking_systems  disadvantages 
december 2013 by jerryking
Malcolm Gladwell explains how being the underdog can give people a leg up
Oct. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JARED BLAND.

Malcolm Gladwell's latest hypothesis is quite simple: What if being disadvantaged, being an underdog, is actually an advantage? As usual, Mr. Gladwell illustrates his argument with lots of fascinating studies and charming stories. But, unlike his previous books, David and Goliath feels especially resonant, perhaps because it arrives at a moment – of income inequality, government shutdowns, the Tea Party, the Occupy movement – when disadvantage is an ever-present reality.

Your book abounds with convincing and moving stories that demonstrate your central points. But there must be lots of exceptions – students who did really well in tiny classrooms, or dyslexics whose lives are constant struggles. What lessons did you learn from them?

The interesting question is what distinguishes the people who overcome adversity from the people who don’t. A lot of it has to do with the magnitude of the adversity. With the stories of the dyslexics who made it, they’re all intelligent people from middle-class homes. You’re not looking at people who have multiple sources of disadvantage. They have one basic source of disadvantage. Every single one of the successful dyslexics I talked to had one person in their life, at least, who always believed in them – their grandmother, a teacher along the way. They all came back to this one person. So that’s also a minimum condition for making it: You can’t have seven problems, obstacles. When you look at those who don’t make it, what you see is the multiplication of problems, the severity of problems.
interviews  Malcolm_Gladwell  underdogs  books  disadvantages  adversity  dyslexics  grit  multiple_stressors  obstacles 
october 2013 by jerryking
Compassionate Action - WSJ.com
February 24, 2003 | WSJ |By BENJAMIN S. CARSON.

In a conversation recently with Gerhardt Casper, the former president of Stanford University, I learned that they had 1,600 freshmen slots and 19,000 applicants for those slots, 10,000 of which had 4.0 grade point averages. They, along with the Ivy League schools and select others, could easily fill the freshman class with 4.0 students. But what about the black student who grew up in the ghetto, in a single-parent home, looking over his shoulder for danger each day as he walked home and still managed to compile a 3.7 GPA and SAT scores in the 90th percentile? Or what about the student from Appalachia with a similar academic record whose father died in a mining accident and had to work and help raise his brothers and sisters?

Do we simply ignore such students or assuage our guilt by saying they don't have to attend one of the premier schools since there are many other excellent universities that would love to have them? Of course not. Instead, many universities take into account factors such as parental education, socioeconomic status, obstacles overcome, learning environment, living environment, responsibilities, special family circumstances, etc., which allows these students admission. The universities correctly reason that if these students could overcome such significant adversities in their lives, they will likely make great contributions to our nation.

This is the principle we should call "compassionate action," and I believe it is the right one for our current dilemma: While race-neutral, it takes a disadvantaged background into account and extends a helping hand to those who need it most. As it turns out, in the U.S., the largest percentage of people from disadvantaged backgrounds happen to be blacks and Hispanics. Those groups will be given a slightly lower bar because of their real difficulties, not from a presumption that their skin color requires it.
affirmative_action  economically_disadvantaged  U.S._Supreme_Court  admissions  race-neutrality  Stanford  applications  SAT  education  students  compassion  Appalachia  disadvantages  GPA  presumptions 
august 2012 by jerryking
Some Truths About Black Disadvantage - WSJ.com
JANUARY 3, 2005 | WSJ | By AMY L. WAX.

A central tenet of the law of remedies is that someone who harms another person -- the wrongdoer -- must undo that harm. Justice requires that the culprit right the wrong by restoring the victim to his rightful position -- the state he would have enjoyed had he never been wronged. In distinguishing between liability and remedy -- between causing harm and undoing harm -- the law also recognizes that reality can fall short of the ideal. The wrongdoer may quite literally lack the power to make the victim whole. The assailant cannot replace the eye he has destroyed. The murderer cannot bring the dead to life. Full justice for the victim may simply be out of reach.
reparations  African-Americans  disadvantages  Bill_Cosby  racism  Amy_Wax  hard_truths 
november 2011 by jerryking
Teaching Young Women to Brag
May 9,2007| WALL STREET Journal|Victoria E. Knight

Reference [Victoria E. Knight, Teaching Young Woman to Brag, WALL ST.J., May 9,2007, at B3 ]

In turn, women of Wall Street are joining groups like High Water Women out of a desire to go beyond checkbook philanthropy....Ms. Klaus explains the importance of framing accomplishments in an engaging way. This means telling a story that highlights accomplishments, passions and interests without descending into a boring laundry list of achievements blighted by overuse of the word Ì`.
advice  mentoring  disadvantages  leadership  women  networking  self-promotion  New_York_City  public_speaking  leadership_development  finance  Wall_Street  philanthropy  storytelling  coaching  praise  daughters  girls 
november 2011 by jerryking
Court Opening Prompts Question About Whether Gender Matters - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JENNIFER S. FORSYTH.

Should minority (i.e. racial, gender, disabled) U.S. Supreme Court
justices see themselves as needing to represent the views of particular
groups, or as acting as an umpire who remains neutral about who wins and
loses?
U.S._Supreme_Court  nominees  disadvantages  law  legal  gender_gap  gender_relations  judges 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Disadvantages of an Elite Education
Summer 2008| The American Scholar|by William Deresiewicz

Our best universities have forgotten that the reason they exist is to make minds, not careers
Colleges_&_Universities  education  culture  introspection  Ivy_League  elitism  disadvantages 
march 2009 by jerryking
Big Middle-Class Sister
Autumn 2008 | City Journal | Naomi Schaefer Riley

We shouldn’t apologize for teaching poor kids how to move up in America.
values  mentoring  NaomiSchaeferRiley  disadvantages  disorganization  movingonup  nonjudgmentalism  life_skills  roadmaps 
march 2009 by jerryking
Not by Tuition Breaks Alone - WSJ.com
MAY 2, 2008 | Wall Street Journal pg. W11| by NAOMI SCHAEFER
RILEY. Details Riley's struggle to help her niece complete her college
admission forms and the disinterest/lack of assistance from high school
guidance counsellors.

"What stands between disadvantaged kids and college is not mere money.
It is orderliness, attentive mentoring and simple organizational
guidance."
African-Americans  Colleges_&_Universities  high_schools  admissions  procedures  disadvantages  disorganization  NaomiSchaeferRiley  economically_disadvantaged 
march 2009 by jerryking

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