recentpopularlog in

jerryking : discounting   6

The End of the Impulse Shopper - WSJ
Nov. 25, 2014 | WSJ |By SHELLY BANJO and SARA GERMANO.

An endangered species in the retail landscape is the ''impulse buy''...grocery shoppers are becoming more intentional and this is paving the way for more innovation in physical and digital merchandising.....Many Americans have the money and the will to spend. But they are time-pressed and deal savvy, visiting stores only when they run out of items like cereal or toilet paper and after doing extensive research on purchases online and with friends. They buy what they came for—and then leave. Those habits threaten more than just gum sales at checkout. Impulse is why stores offer deep discounts on loss leaders, why they put the milk in the back corner and why marketers spend heavily to pile up products in displays at the ends of the aisles. If shoppers just target the deals and don’t let their eyes wander, long cherished models for boosting sales fall apart...the symptoms of the industry’s malaise are clear enough: extended declines in shopper traffic, weak sales growth, and a discount-driven race to the bottom that is sapping pricing power.
impulse_purchasing  bricks-and-mortar  retailers  grocery  supermarkets  habits  discounting  shopping  shopping_experience  Turnstyle  intentionality  discretionary_spending  loss_leaders  foot_traffic  merchandising  frugality  decline  symptoms  endangered  time-strapped 
january 2015 by jerryking
Whole Foods' Battle for the Organic Shopper - WSJ.com
Aug. 21, 2013 | WSJ | By Julie Jargon.

"The recession was a wake-up call for us," said co-Chief Executive Walter Robb in an interview.

One of the chain's latest initiatives: nationwide "flash" sales on specific items promoted on Twitter and Facebook FB -0.02% that run for just a few hours, like a five-hour buy-one-get-one-free deal on ice cream last month. The chain also is increasing one-day sales on items like salmon, blueberries and organic chicken to 17 this fiscal year, from 14 last year.

Whole Foods long avoided such supermarket tactics, thriving instead on a pricey mix of products that appealed to clientele in upscale neighborhoods of large cities where most of its approximately 350 stores are located. High prices on everything from meat to vegetables led critics to quip that shopping at Whole Foods would eat up a middle class earner's whole paycheck....Mr. Robb last month told investors the chain is going to engage in "more aggressive price matching against select competitors," and said price reductions and promotions could start "nipping gross margins a little bit."

The strategy carries other risks. Jim Hertel, managing partner at Willard Bishop, a food retail consulting firm, said grocers who rely on short-term gains from discounts can feel compelled to "up the dosage of deals" to keep sales growing. "When you do that you suddenly start to promote so much that you take sales out of the store because everything is on discount," he said. "Customers get trained not to buy on full price."

Deals also can attract new customers who don't buy more than the item on sale and don't necessarily return, defeating the purpose—a phenomenon Mr. Hertel calls "rent a customer."
Whole_Foods  organic  grocery  supermarkets  discounting  social_media  flash_sales  merchandising 
october 2013 by jerryking
Business; Private Traders See Gold in Venture Capital Ruins
April 15, 2001 By AMY CORTESE This article is a tickler on the
issue of a KPMG's ICE group selling a service to evaluate and assess VC
and PE portfolio for the secondary market. What conceptual tools would
be needed to automate/systematize the process?
portfolios  secondary_markets  venture_capital  KPMG  due_diligence  exits  relationships  one-of-a-kind  valuations  discounting  bubbles  liquidity  tools 
december 2008 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read