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jerryking : discrimination   18

‘Lopping,’ ‘Tips’ and the ‘Z-List’: Bias Lawsuit Explores Harvard’s Admissions Secrets
July 29, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Anemona Hartocollis, Amy Harmon and Mitch Smith.
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One tries very hard to assess the candidate’s potential. Is he or she a self-starter? How much help has he had? Has the candidate peaked? How will he or she react to not being head of the class?

Does he or she have the core values, confidence, perspective and flexibility to adapt and thrive? Not surprisingly, companies and others prefer applicants who have what a law firm where I later recruited called “a can-do attitude.”
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........The case has been orchestrated by Edward Blum, a longtime crusader against affirmative action and voting rights laws, and it may yield him a fresh chance to get the issue before the Supreme Court. The court turned away his last major challenge to university admissions, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, in 2016.

[Read: How other Ivy League schools are coming to Harvard’s defense.]

The debate goes back to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 was a turning point, pushing colleges to redouble their efforts to be more representative of American society.

But Asians were an overlooked minority despite a long history of discrimination. .......The plaintiffs say that the personal rating — which considers an applicant’s character and personality — is the most insidious of Harvard’s admissions metrics. They say that Asian-Americans are routinely described as industrious and intelligent, but unexceptional and indistinguishable — characterizations that recall painful stereotypes for many people of Asian descent. (The applicant who was the “proverbial picket fence” was Asian-American.).........Professor Khurana, the Harvard College dean, acknowledged that Harvard was not always perfect, but said it was trying to get its practices right.

“I have a great deal of humility knowing that some day history will judge us,” Professor Khurana said. “I think that’s why we are constantly asking ourselves this question: How can we do better? How could we be better? What are we missing? Where are our blind spots?”
admissions  affirmative_action  Asian-Americans  blind_spots  Colleges_&_Universities  discrimination  diversity  Harvard  Ivy_League  lawsuits  race-blind  race-conscious  selection_processes  biases  elitism  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  1968  core_values 
august 2018 by jerryking
The Widening Racial Wealth Divide
OCTOBER 10, 2016 ISSUE | - The New Yorker | By James Surowiecki
THE WIDENING RACIAL WEALTH DIVIDE
It would take black Americans two hundred and twenty-eight years to have as much wealth as white Americans have today.

As Thomas Shapiro, a sociologist at Brandeis and the co-author of the seminal book “Black Wealth/White Wealth,” told me, “History and legacy created the racial gap. Policies have maintained it.” Together, they contribute to what he’s called “the hidden cost of being African-American.”

Start with history. Beginning in the New Deal and on into the postwar years, the federal government invested heavily to help ordinary Americans buy homes and go to school, via programs like the Federal Housing Administration and the G.I. Bill. That fuelled an economic boom and fostered the growth of a prosperous middle class. But black Americans received little of this assistance. Redlining by banks and by government agencies prevented black families from buying homes in white neighborhoods; in a thirty-year period, just two per cent of F.H.A. loans went to families of color. G.I. Bill benefits went disproportionately to white veterans. Black agricultural and domestic workers were excluded from Social Security until the fifties. As Dedrick Asante-Muhammad, the co-author of the CFED/I.P.S. report, told me, “Massive government investment helped create an American middle class. But it was a white American middle class.”
racial_disparities  James_Surowiecki  race  African-Americans  redlining  discrimination  generational_wealth  racism  education  housing  intergenerational  New_Deal  wealth_creation  home_ownership  books  post-WWII 
october 2016 by jerryking
How Segregation Destroys Black Wealth
SEPT. 15, 2015 | NYT | By THE EDITORIAL BOARD.

The Federal Housing Administration, created during the New Deal to promote homeownership, openly supported these racist measures; it forbade lending to black people even as it subsidized white families that moved from the cities to the suburbs. Cut off from fairly priced home loan credit, black neighborhoods deteriorated and their values plummeted....Many discriminatory practices were formally ended with the civil rights and fair lending laws of the 1960s and 70s. But these were quickly replaced by subtler techniques that encouraged ghettoization, like channeling black families away from white areas and banks’ and mortgage brokers’ systematically pushing middle-income black families into high-cost, high-risk loans when they could have qualified for more affordable loans....This history of discrimination has taken an enormous toll on black wealth, as is shown in research by Douglas Massey and Jonathan Tannen at Princeton University’s Office of Population Research. In 1970, two years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, for example, the average well-off black American lived in a neighborhood where potential home wealth, as measured by property values, stood at about only $50,000 — as opposed to $105,000 for affluent whites and $56,000 for poor whites.

By 2010, affluent African-Americans had passed poor whites in potential home wealth but had fallen further behind affluent whites. There is more than money at stake, Mr. Massey and Mr. Tannen write, because home values “translate directly into access to higher quality education given that public schools in the United States are financed by real estate taxes.”

Throughout history, ethnic groups have been able to translate economic gains into housing in better neighborhoods and advantages for their children. But for African-Americans, the researchers write, that transition has been “thwarted by segregation and the prejudice and discrimination that create and maintain it.” In other words, the damage reaches across generations and continues today
African-Americans  discrimination  education  generational_wealth  home_ownership  housing  intergenerational  New_Deal  prejudice  public_education  public_schools  racial_disparities  racism  real_estate_taxes  redlining  segregation  wealth_creation  wealth_management 
september 2015 by jerryking
Percy Sledge and the Southern Soul Revolution | The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
April 16: 9 a.m.
Posted by Charles L Hughes

Sledge’s spare, aching ballad – the still-iconic “When A Man Loves A Woman” – not only set a musical template for deep soul, but also reflected the unique musical alchemy that made Muscle Shoals and southern soul into an international symbol of cultural change. ....By the end of the 1960s, southern-soul was one of the most prominent styles of popular music and a symbol for racial breakthrough in the era of Civil Rights and Black Power. -
'60s  black_liberation_movement  black_nationalism  Percy_Sledge  tributes  obituaries  soul  Muscle_Shoals  singers  music  songwriters  southern_soul  discrimination  Black_Power 
april 2015 by jerryking
The Measuring Sticks of Racial Bias - NYTimes.com
JAN. 3, 2015
Continue reading the main story
Economic View
By SENDHIL MULLAINATHAN
racial_disparities  racism  biases  African-Americans  race  Ferguson  résumés  bigotry  discrimination 
january 2015 by jerryking
Lives Lived: Walter Koyanagi, 93 - The Globe and Mail
JOHN KOYANAGI
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 25 2014
tributes  Ivey  obituaries  discrimination 
september 2014 by jerryking
Minorities possible unfairly disqualified from opening bank accounts | mathbabe
August 7, 2013 Cathy O'Neil,

New York State attorney general Eric T. Schneiderman’s investigation into possibly unfair practices by big banks using opaque and sometimes erroneous databases to disqualify people from opening accounts.

Not much hard information is given in the article but we know that negative reports stemming from the databases have effectively banished more than a million lower-income Americans from the financial system, and we know that the number of “underbanked” people in this country has grown by 10% since 2009. Underbanked people are people who are shut out of the normal banking system and have to rely on the underbelly system including check cashing stores and payday lenders....The second, more interesting point – at least to me – is this. We care about and defend ourselves from our constitutional rights being taken away but we have much less energy to defend ourselves against good things not happening to us.

In other words, it’s not written into the constitution that we all deserve a good checking account, nor a good college education, nor good terms on a mortgage, and so on. Even so, in a large society such as ours, such things are basic ingredients for a comfortable existence. Yet these services are rare if not nonexistent for a huge and swelling part of our society, resulting in a degradation of opportunity for the poor.

The overall effect is heinous, and at some point does seem to rise to the level of a constitutional right to opportunity, but I’m no lawyer.

In other words, instead of only worrying about the truly bad things that might happen to our vulnerable citizens, I personally spend just as much time worrying about the good things that might not happen to our vulnerable citizens, because from my perspective lots of good things not happening add up to bad things happening: they all narrow future options.
visible_minorities  discrimination  data  data_scientists  banks  banking  unbanked  equality  equality_of_opportunity  financial_system  constitutional_rights  payday_lenders  Cathy_O’Neil  optionality  opportunity_gaps  low-income 
december 2013 by jerryking
There needs to be a sober examination of our state of affairs Georgetown, Guyana
December 6, 2013 | Stabroek News | Frank Fyffe.

Said Fenty: “I now lament the stark fact that politics, governance, discrimination, corruption, management of resources and lack of employment among other factors, have caused young Guyanese to yearn to leave this homeland still rich with resources. Do you realise what national hopelessness means amongst the larger portion of our population?” But who can honestly look you in the eye and deny that? And I’m not denying the hard, perilous and precarious times many are faced with abroad, but the very fact that they crave madly the opportunity to leave paints a picture and tells a different story ‒ too many things are amiss and adrift.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  failed_states  misgovernance  hopelessness  brain_drain  emigration  politics  governance  discrimination  corruption  mismanagement  unemployment  precarious 
december 2013 by jerryking
If you’re black, go backCommentaries
Oct 10, 2013 | Trinidad Express Newspaper | By Reginald Dumas.

In March 2007 Amnesty International (AI) published a report which stated that some 20-30,000 Haitians were expelled every year from the Dominican Republic (DR) and that many of these expulsions breached international human rights law. Haitians and Dominico-Haitians were often rounded up and deported with no chance of appeal, purely on the basis of their skin colour (my emphasis). Many had valid work permits and visas, and some were in fact Dominicans with no family ties to Haiti (my emphasis).
Caribbean  discrimination  Haitians  Dominican_Republic  colorism  shadism 
october 2013 by jerryking
Walking While Black in the 'White Gaze' - NYTimes.com
September 1, 2013, 7:00 pm 172 Comments
Walking While Black in the ‘White Gaze’
By GEORGE YANCY
discrimination  philosophy  racial_profiling  African-Americans  Trayvon_Martin  MLK  race  ethnicity 
september 2013 by jerryking

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