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jerryking : disease   45

Sitting for More Than 13 Hours a Day May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise
April 10, 2019 |The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and many other chronic conditions. Even a single workout can improve our metabolisms, studies show, so that we burn fat more efficiently after meals and keep our blood sugar and insulin levels steady.

Inactivity, meanwhile, has almost the opposite physiological effects. People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.
inactivity  sedentariness  mens'_health  disease  exercise  fitness  metabolism 
april 2019 by jerryking
The Sewers of Paris and the Making of the Modern City | CBC Radio
Philip Coulter goes underground in the City of Light to visit the City of Smell. Part 1 of 2-part series.
CBC Radio · January 25
19th_century  CBC_Radio  cities  disease  herd_immunity  history  pandemics  Paris  plague  public_goods  public_health  sewage 
january 2019 by jerryking
Why some killer diseases are overlooked
Simon Kuper FEBRUARY 1, 2018

A poor-children’s disease — diarrhoea, which kills the most kids after pneumonia, is another example — won’t produce many well-off, articulate advocates. Moreover, there’s no simple magic bullet for pneumonia. The disease has many causes and two main forms: viral and bacterial. Health workers often misdiagnose it, sometimes because they haven’t been trained in pneumonia. And many health workers will continue to emigrate from poor to rich countries, says Tom Kenyon, who heads Project HOPE, a health NGO.

Still, difficult as pneumonia is, it’s fixable. Its death toll has fallen, albeit slowly.
attention_economy  brain_drain  disease  malaria  overlooked  pneumonia  Simon_Kuper  vaccines 
february 2018 by jerryking
Red Meat Increases Risk of Dying From 8 Diseases
MAY 15, 2017 | The New York Times | By NICHOLAS BAKALAR.

The more red meat you eat, the greater your risk of dying from one of eight diseases, according to a new report.

Researchers studied more than 536,000 men and women ages 50 to 71, tracking their diet and health for an average of 16 years. They recorded intake of total meat, processed and unprocessed red meat (beef, lamb and pork), and white meat (poultry and fish).

Compared with the one-fifth of people who ate the least red meat, the one-fifth who ate the most had a 26 percent increased risk of death from various causes. High red meat consumption increased the rate of dying from cancer, heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, infections, kidney disease and liver disease. The study is in BMJ.

White meat, on the other hand, may be good for you. The researchers found that those who ate the highest proportion of white meat had a 25 percent reduced risk of dying from various causes compared with those who ate the least white meat.
meat  pork  lamb  dying  cured_and_smoked  chicken  dish  diets  disease  cancers 
august 2017 by jerryking
Nathan Wolfe: No More Ebola Whac-A-Mole - WSJ - WSJ
By NATHAN WOLFE
Oct. 13, 2014 7:04

Ebola is not the first virus to threaten the world, and it won’t be the last. Stopping the current epidemic is vital, but the world can’t afford to go to sleep after it is stopped. Unless we prepare for the next epidemic, we will find ourselves forever nailing down outbreaks just in time to see the next ones pop up.
disease_surveillance  Ebola  pandemics  interconnections  zoonotic  flu_outbreaks  epidemics  Congo  viruses  disease  surveillance  preparation  disaster_preparedness 
october 2014 by jerryking
Ebola: Can we learn from SARS? - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD SCHABAS AND NEIL RAU
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 27 2014

here are four key things to know about Ebola:

1. It’s fundamentally spread from animal to human, not human to human.
This is an animal outbreak, with humans as collateral damage. The driving force is new infections acquired from animals. Human-to-human outbreaks are short-lived. This is not a single human outbreak starting from a “case zero.”

The specific animal reservoir for Ebola is unknown but is probably a jungle animal used for food, known as “bush meat.” The large number of cases in West Africa must be the result of more human contact with infected animals, either because there are more infected animals or because they are consumed or hunted more aggressively in West Africa than elsewhere. While identifying a specific animal host would certainly aid in prevention efforts, bush meat remains an important source of dietary protein and won’t be abandoned overnight as a food source. Ebola is a disease of poverty – a potentially deadly meal is better than no meal at all.

2. Unlike SARS, this outbreak won’t end quickly.

This is bad news for West Africa, which should expect a steady stream of new human infections.

3. Quarantine was abandoned a century ago.

There is an essential difference between quarantine and case isolation. Quarantine targets well people potentially incubating an infection; it’s impractical, ineffective and economically disruptive. Case isolation, on the other hand, targets individuals showing symptoms of disease and is the cornerstone of effective infection control.
4. Ebola may cause a scare, but it can’t cause an outbreak in Canada.
Ebola  SARS  flu_outbreaks  lessons_learned  disease  viruses  zoonosis  short-lived  collateral_damage  bad_news  Africa  West_Africa  infections 
september 2014 by jerryking
Drug-funding sob stories make for good reading, but we need hard evidence to set public policy
Mar. 16 2014 | The Globe and Mail | ANDRÉ PICARD.

the key question in public policy is always: What else could be done with the money that would provide more bang for the buck?

To fund or not fund drugs is not an easy discussion to have. But it is a necessary one. As compelling as the stories of suffering children may be, we have to make decisions based on evidence. We also owe it to ourselves to negotiate firmly with drug-makers.

We cannot continue to fall prey to emotional blackmail, no matter how much the headlines sting.
no_sob_stories  public_policy  André_Picard  pharmaceutical_industry  orphan_drugs  disease  opportunity_costs  evidence_based  emotional_blackmail  evidence  difficult_conversations 
march 2014 by jerryking
Stone Age cave dwellers had healthier mouths than we do - The Globe and Mail
PAUL TAYLOR

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Feb. 21 2013

Think of your mouth as being in a constant state of disease..."There is a very low diversity of bacterial species and a high prevalence of disease-causing pathogens."...In fact, our teeth and gums are generally in worse shape than our cave-dwelling ancestors....What's to blame? Our shift to a carbohydrate-rich diet – especially the increased consumption of processed sugar – fostered the growth of certain bacteria that cause gum disease and dental decay, "Hunter-gatherers in general had really good teeth. You see quite a bit of wear because of the highly abrasive nature of their diet, but you see almost no signs of pathology," said Cooper.

"That all changes with farming and the increased consumption of domesticated cereals," added Cooper.

The DNA analysis revealed that as agriculture took hold, there was a marked decrease in bacterial diversity and certain disease-causing microbes became more prevalent, including Porphyromonas gingivalis which contributes to gum disease.The composition of oral bacteria underwent another dramatic shift with the industrial revolution and the introduction of processed sugar and flour. There was a further decrease in diversity, and a rise in bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans, which causes dental caries commonly known as cavities......Diet has influenced the bacteria that inhabit the human body "and we can see that in the oral cavity," said Cooper. "One can pretty safely deduce that same thing has happened in the gastrointestinal system, which is arguably even more important in terms of the role of bacteria in human health."

Indeed, a growing body of medical research suggests that the loss of beneficial bacteria is associated with a range of modern systemic diseases, from diabetes and heart disease, to obesity and autism. And perhaps most important of all, a diverse gut bacteria is necessary to train the immune systems of young children.
evolution  bacteria  diets  dental  guts  disease  pathogens  digestive_systems  microbes  microbiome  gums  gastrointestinal  hunter-gatherers  immune_system  human_evolution 
february 2013 by jerryking
Catching the Sights, Not the Bugs - NYTimes.com
By EMILY BRENNAN
Published: December 26, 2012

Q. What should you pack?

A. For any overseas trip, I recommend taking along self-treatment for traveler’s diarrhea — loperamide, known by the brand name Imodium here, and an antibiotic, the most common being ciprofloxacin.

If you’re going to a malarial area, the travel clinic should prescribe you malaria prophylaxis, the most common of which is Malarone, to take during your trip and seven days after it. That will kill off any parasites in your bloodstream, but two milder forms of malaria can continue to multiply in the liver. If you develop an unexplained fever six months, even a year, after your return, go to your doctor.

Other things to pack: Band-Aids and topical antibiotics to treat minor wounds; water purification tablets like Potable Aquaor Coghlan’s or portable filters; sunscreen; and insect repellent with 30 to 50 percent DEET. Hikers should bring a full suture kit. If you’re staying in accommodations that do not have good screens, I recommend getting mosquito nets and clothes impregnated with pyrethrum, a natural insect repellent.
travel  disease  prevention  mens'_health  illness  germs  insurance  malaria  diarrhea  packing  safety 
december 2012 by jerryking
Ancient Bones That Tell a Story of Compassion - NYTimes.com
By JAMES GORMAN
Published: December 17, 2012

some archaeologists are suggesting a closer, more systematic look at how prehistoric people — who may have left only their bones — treated illness, injury and incapacitation. Call it the archaeology of health care....Cases of case extreme examples of illness and disability, have prompted Ms. Lorna Tilley and Dr. Oxenham to ask what the dimensions of such a story are, what care for the sick and injured says about the culture that provided it....the “bioarchaeology of care,” “has the potential to provide important — and possibly unique — insights into the lives of those under study.” In the case of Burial 9, Tilley says, not only does his care indicate tolerance and cooperation in his culture, but suggests that he himself had a sense of his own worth and a strong will to live. Without that, she says, he could not have stayed alive...Ms. Tilley wrote “The Bioarchaeology of Care” for a special report on new directions in bioarchaeology published this year in the Archaeological Record, the magazine of the Society for American Archaeology.
archeological  disabilities  disease  compassion  research_methods  illness  injuries  incapacitation  prehistoric  bones  tolerance  cooperation  sickness  insights 
december 2012 by jerryking
Where Germs Lurk on Planes - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011
Where Germs Lurk on Planes
What to Do When Stuck at 30,000 Feet Next to Sneezers and Coughers
By SCOTT MCCARTNEY
germs  viruses  flu_outbreaks  airports  mens'_health  airline_industry  travel  airlines  disease  safety  illness 
december 2011 by jerryking
Eluding Germs on Planes - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 22, 2003 | WSJ | Jennifer Saranow.

When Ronald Primas arrives at the airport for a flight, he picks up his boarding pass and heads through security. He then pops a decongestant and gives himself a spritz of nasal spray. Dr. Primas, a travel-medicine specialist in New York, says his germ-fighting routine helps him avoid catching colds and sinus infections on planes.

Once buckled into his seat, he rubs his hands with an alcohol-based sanitizer such as Purell -- and avoids touching his head and neck area until his hands are de-germed.

Dr. Primas is more worried about germs being passed by another person -- someone coughing on him, for example -- than from inanimate objects such as blankets or pillows, which he uses freely. (Those items, he says, have usually been recently washed.) But just to be safe, when he goes to the bathroom, he uses a tissue to open the door, flush and turn on the faucet.
flu_outbreaks  airports  mens'_health  aircraft  airline_industry  airlines  travel  germs  disease  illness  sanitation 
november 2011 by jerryking
Chimp to Human to History Books - The Circuitous Path of AIDS - NYTimes.com
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
Published: October 17, 2011

Dr. Jacques Pépin, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Sherbrooke in Quebec, performs a remarkable feat. He documents
Our story begins sometime close to 1921, somewhere between the Sanaga River in Cameroon and the Congo River in the former Belgian Congo. It involves chimps and monkeys, hunters and butchers, “free women” and prostitutes, syringes and plasma-sellers, evil colonial lawmakers and decent colonial doctors with the best of intentions. And a virus that, against all odds, appears to have made it from one ape in the central African jungle to one Haitian bureaucrat leaving Zaire for home and then to a few dozen men in California gay bars before it was even noticed — about 60 years after its journey began.
AIDS  disease  Congo  primates  HIV  viruses  origin_story 
october 2011 by jerryking
Drugs That Are as Smart as Our Diseases | Mind & Matter - WSJ.com
SEPT.17, 2011 | WSJ | By MATT RIDLEY. The very opposite of
Moore's Law is happening at the downstream end of the R&D pipeline.
The number of new molecules approved per billion dollars of
inflation-adjusted R&D has declined inexorably at 9% a year and is
now 1/100th of what it was in 1950....

Drugs must be designed to nudge whole networks rather than single
targets. e.g., to develop a treatment for the hospital infection
Clostridium difficile, e-Therapeutics drew a sort of spider's web of how
all the proteins on the outside of the bacterium interacted. From that
web, they identified crucial nodes in the network and, by trial and
error, selected a combination of molecules that could attack those
nodes.

A similar approach is showing promise for cancer and even neurological
disease. It means hitting multiple targets simultaneously, the targets
chosen by network analysis. Where diseases are complex, the cures will
be complex, too.
drugs  pharmaceutical_industry  R&D  decline  research  cancers  networks  complexity  disease  biochemistry  Moore's_Law  molecules  trial_&_error  multiple_targets  Clostridium_difficile 
september 2011 by jerryking
Matt Ridley on How Diseases Fell Species | Mind & Matter - WSJ.com
* JANUARY 29, 2011

Our Unwitting Germ Warfare on Animals

*
By MATT RIDLEY

Columnist's name
disease 
february 2011 by jerryking
Health Danger of Parties Past—Hepatitis C - WSJ.com
SEPT. 20, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MELINDA BECK.
Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver, generally caused by viruses,
with symptoms ranging from slight to severe. Versions A through C are
the most common. * Hep A: Transmitted via contaminated water or food,
particularly in countries with poor hygiene. Hep B: 2 billion people
world-wide infected with hep B, mostly through infected blood or body
fluids. It can become chronic and lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer,
but most adults clear the virus without treatment and are then immune. *
Hep C: Spread by blood-to-blood transmission, with few symptoms either
in early stages or for decades later. About 20% of chronic cases develop
into cirrhosis or liver cancer. Curable in about 50% of cases by
chemotherapy. * Hep D: Caused by a small RNA virus that only propagates
in the presence of hep B, greatly increasing the chance of cancer,
cirrhosis and death. * Hep E: Transmitted by fecal-oral contamination in
unsanitary conditions.
hepatitis  mens'_health  Melinda_Beck  disease  viruses 
september 2010 by jerryking
New approaches to quantifying the spread of infect... [Nat Rev Microbiol. 2005] - PubMed result
Traditional approaches to mathematical modelling of infectious
diseases deal most effectively with large outbreaks in large
populations. The desire to elucidate the highly variable dynamics of
disease spread amongst small numbers of individuals has fuelled the
development of models that depend more directly on surveillance and
contact-tracing data. This signals a move towards a closer interplay
between epidemiological modelling, surveillance and disease-management
strategies.
models  mathematics  surveillance  disease  disease_surveillance  market_segmentation  size  flu_outbreaks  epidemiology  infections 
march 2010 by jerryking
Blame Evolution for Disease - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MELINDA BECK.
Obesity? Big Feet? Blame Darwin. Evolution Helped Humans Have Children
and Survive, But It Also Led to Modern-Day Maladies, Scientists Say.

Evolution, the theory goes, guarantees survival to the fittest. But we
can blame evolution for some of today's most pressing health problems,
such as cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease...Most
scientists—including biologists, anthropologists, paleontologists and
geneticists—see the 21st century human body as a collection of
compromises, jury-rigged by evolution as our ancestors adapted to
changing conditions.
Melinda_Beck  evolution  theory_of_evolution  disease  human_anatomy  Charles_Darwin  human_evolution 
february 2010 by jerryking
The worst of all worlds: another mad cow
Jan 13, 2005. | The Globe & Mail pg. A.19 | by Margaret
Wente . William Leiss, a risk-management expert at the University of
Ottawa.
disease  Margaret_Wente  risks  risk-management  worst_of_all_worlds 
december 2009 by jerryking
Attack of the killer of tomatoes
Aug. 20, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Dakshana Bascaramurty
tomatoes  gardening  fungi  disease 
august 2009 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - You Say Tomato, I Say Agricultural Disaster - NYTimes.com
August 8, 2009 | New York Times | By DAN BARBER. " The latest
trouble is the explosion of late blight, a plant disease that attacks
potatoes and tomatoes".
gardening  tomatoes  disease  fungi 
august 2009 by jerryking
A Plague Reborn
July-August 2008 | Harvard Magazine | by Jonathan Shaw
disease  pandemics  plague 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Age of Pandemics - WSJ.com
MAY 2, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By LARRY BRILLIANT
Modernity--population growth, climate change and increased contact
between humans and animals--is causing more new viruses with pandemic
potential to jump from their traditional animal hosts to humans.
Brilliant outlines what the world needs to do to prepare.

Indeed, to the epidemiological community, the Influenza Pandemic of 2009 is one of the most widely anticipated diseases in history. ....The current pathogen creating the threat is actually a mixture of viral genetic elements from all over the globe that have sorted, shifted, sorted, shifted, drifted and recombined to form this worrisome virus.....Here's the good news: Compared with a few years ago, the world is somewhat better prepared to deal with pandemic influenza. There have been training meetings, table-top exercises, dry runs and preparedness drills at virtually every level of government and civil society. ......Here's the bad news: Today, we remain underprepared for any pandemic or major outbreak, whether it comes from newly emerging infectious diseases, bioterror attack or laboratory accident. We do not have the best general disease surveillance systems or "surge" capacity in our hospitals and health-care facilities......And there is worse news: The 2009 swine flu will not be the last and may not be the worst pandemic that we will face in the coming years. Indeed, we might be entering an Age of Pandemics........In our lifetimes, or our children's lifetimes, we will face a broad array of dangerous emerging 21st-century diseases, man-made or natural, brand-new or old, newly resistant to our current vaccines and antiviral drugs.....Bioterror weapons are cheap and do not need huge labs or government support. They are the poor man's WMD.....
21st._century  bad_news  bioterrorism  disaster_preparedness  disease  disease_surveillance  epidemics  flu_outbreaks  genetic_drift  genetic_shift  infections  influenza  man-made  modernity  pandemics  pathogens  preparation  sorting  surge_capacity  underprepared  viruses  zoonotic 
may 2009 by jerryking
Understanding Swine Flu - WSJ.com
APRIL 28, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by HENRY I. MILLER
disease  influenza  transmission  epidemics  livestock 
april 2009 by jerryking
Creating a Bookshelf of Valuable Resources
Spring 2007. | Nieman Reports. Cambridge: Vol. 61, Iss. 1; pg. 100, 2 pgs |Anonymous.
disease  influenza  root_cause  booklists 
april 2009 by jerryking
Pledged to Find Cancer Cure, but Advances Prove Elusive - Series - NYTimes.com
April 23, 2009 | New York Times | By GINA KOLATA

The death rate for cancer, adjusted for the size and age of the
population, dropped only 5 percent from 1950 to 2005. In contrast, the
death rate for heart disease dropped 64 percent in that time, and for
flu and pneumonia, it fell 58 percent.
survival  disease  prevention  metastatic  Gina_Kolata  cancers 
april 2009 by jerryking

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