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jerryking : disillusioned   7

China is changing the geopolitical climate. Canada has to mitigate, and adapt
MAY 16, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | EDITORIAL.

So what’s Canada to do? In the long run, Canadian governments dealing with Beijing need to keep four things in mind.

China is more threat than opportunity. Unlike our other major trading partners, China is not a democratic, rule-of-law country. There was once hope China could behave as a rule-of-law country internationally, even as it remained a dictatorship at home. There was also a belief that China’s economic advances would lead to an opening up of its political system. That hasn’t happened. If anything, the Xi Jinping regime is turning back the clock on individual freedoms.

That lack of Chinese political liberalization is at the root of what is fast turning into a new Cold War. Among the problems: In a world of liberalized trade, the rules end up benefiting the totalitarian state, since its companies can access the protections of our legal system, while our companies are subject to perfectly legal shakedowns in China.

China is not our enemy. But it is not our friend. There was once a fantasy that friendship would be as easy as establishing personal connections with Beijing’s ruling circle. They would surely melt at the mention of the sainted memory of Norman Bethune, the Canadian physician who followed Mao Zedong, founder of the People’s Republic and murderer of millions.

Mao wasn’t a sentimental man and neither are his heirs.

To counterbalance China, we need allies. Canada has long worked to build multilateral alliances to give us a bit of leverage when dealing with our giant neighbour, the United States. The giant across the ocean presents a similar, but more troubling, challenge. The good news is we have natural allies. That list includes the U.S., at least in the post-Trump world. It includes the European Union. And it includes China’s worried democratic neighbours: Japan and South Korea.

We need to avoid becoming trade-dependent on China. We have natural allies who want to do likewise. That’s what the Trans-Pacific Partnership was supposed to be about. That’s what pursuing greater and freer trade with Japan and South Korea is about.

Canada should never aim to shut down trade with China. But we have to make sure the future doesn’t leave us without room to manoeuvre, or to push back.
adaptability  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  delusions  disillusioned  editorials  geopolitics  hostages  Huawei  kidnappings  Meng_Wanzhou  multilateralism  predatory_practices  reprisals  rogue_actors  threats  totalitarian  TPP  Xi_Jinping 
may 2019 by jerryking
Retailing Through The Trough Of Disillusionment -
January 22, 2016Posted in Blog, Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Strategy, Technology, The Future

By Doug Stephens
Doug_Stephens  retailers  strategy  location_based_services  LBMA  tech-utopianism  disillusioned  Gartner 
january 2016 by jerryking
No salesman will call
March 31, 2006 | Report on Business Magazine | DOUG STEINER.
Yes, you can get free on-line investment advice that's solid and has no
strings attached...."Selhi's website focuses on advice about investing,
which is very different from investment advice. In recent years, he and
several other volunteer sages and coaches have been regulars on several
websites, and have got to know one another. Many of them are also
self-taught. Others are industry professionals who are retired or
disillusioned by the lack of truth about investing costs.

Together, this group has built a new website,
http://www.financialwebring.com, that is a forum for a low-cost
investing community. Through blogs, links and chat rooms, the site helps
everyone through every step and unspoken nuance of the investing
process. When I asked Selhi why he does all this, he responded with a
question: "Why do people volunteer?" He doesn't make money from his
work. The satisfaction comes from helping others. "
Doug_Steiner  investment_advice  free  DIY  advice  equity_research  disillusioned  investing  investors 
august 2010 by jerryking
Innocent Abroad
Apr 27, 2004 | Wall Street Journal pg. D.10 | Hugo Restall.
Reviews LOSING THE NEW CHINA
By Ethan Gutmann (Encounter Books, 253 pages, $25.95). like expats
everywhere, especially those who don't speak the language and thus are
isolated from the local residents, he became jaded the longer he stayed
-- and came to confuse cynicism with sophistication. That's the only way
to explain why Mr. Gutmann's memoir of 3 years in Beijing, "Losing the
New China," is such a polemic. Unremittingly he pushes a negative view
of China and its future. As for the American businessmen who are helping
to make China's economy grow, they are portrayed as either dupes or
traitors -- agents of corruption, undemocratic values and hedonism.
ProQuest  China  book_reviews  disillusioned  expatriates  books  memoirs 
march 2010 by jerryking

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