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jerryking : dissatisfaction   11

Daniel S. Glaser: The Challenge of Keeping It Simple
JULY 15, 2016 | The New York Times | By ADAM BRYANT.

When I joined Marsh more than 30 years ago, he said to me, “Danny, all I can tell you is that there’s going to be a lot of people who don’t think like an owner, and you should always be thinking like you are the owner of the business, and make your decisions like that.”..Empathy is more important as he matured: "Now I have a basic belief that almost everyone wants to contribute and do well. Some people, for a whole variety of reasons, have difficulty doing that, and at least an attempt or two should be made to try to help them."...I’ve always felt that the world is filled with smart people who love complicating stuff. Working to simplify, to try to get down to that first principle, is really important.....My feeling is that companies that do well for long stretches of time have a tendency to become either complacent or arrogant, and both of those are bad paths. So how do you prevent that? To me, you do that by trying to create this striving, challenging, questioning culture, where there’s always a smarter way of doing something, and you feel a permanent dissatisfaction with obtained results.
bonuses  empathy  CEOs  leadership  leaders  complacency  arrogance  hubris  hiring  organizational_culture  forward_looking  simplicity  Marsh_&_McLennan  owners  dissatisfaction  first_principle  restlessness 
july 2016 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
Burberry's Rose Marie Bravo Designs Ways to Keep Brand Growing and Still Exclusive
September 9, 2004 | THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Page B1 | By SALLY BEATTY
Staff Reporter

FASHIONABLE TIPS

Lessons from Rose Marie Bravo on rebuilding and sustaining a hot brand:

• Lesson 1: Do...
Burberry  fashion  branding  brands  CEOs  reinvention  dissatisfaction  execution  teams  exclusivity 
february 2014 by jerryking
Feminists need to challenge themselves, too
Mar. 04 2013 |The Globe and Mail | by NAOMI WOLF.
[dissatisfaction = challenging oneself = self-challenge]
Ms. Sandberg is seeking not just to raise consciousness, but to forge a social movement. She wants her “Lean In” circles – all-women spaces to be supported by corporate workplaces – to teach women negotiation, public speaking and other skills, all merged with upbeat collective support....the opportunity to learn and practise speaking and negotiating skills is hardly inconsequential for women’s advancement... Institutional battles to redress women’s underrepresentation in land ownership, politics, and so on must be coupled with individualized leadership and skills training for women, ideally in an atmosphere of mutual support in which women learn from peers how to achieve and enlarge their own goals.
Sheryl_Sandberg  glass_ceilings  Facebook  social_movements  women  self-scrutiny  mentoring  movingonup  life_skills  workplaces  self-promotion  land_ownership  leadership_development  consciousness-raising  feminism  dissatisfaction  under-representation 
march 2013 by jerryking
Warning: The boom out West is both a lure and a trap
April 26, 2008 | Globe and Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON.

"But the hardest thing in politics is to think ahead, way ahead. The No. 1 question every government in these provinces should ask is:
Can't we do better?

Better means transforming more raw materials in Canada, wherever possible. Better means thinking not just of a Western gateway as a
transportation system, but as a way of putting industries and people together to add value to what is shipped.

Better means not just drilling and scouring, but figuring out how to lead the world in sustainable development, so that when China and
India and others decide they need to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, Canadian companies and governments can show them how, and sell them the technology and know-how.

Better means making universities even better than they are, because using today's money to invest in tomorrow's minds is the best investment for when the commodities boom weakens. "
Jeffrey_Simpson  Ontario  federal-provincial_relations  politics  Alberta  equalization_payments  commodities  value_added  Colleges_&_Universities  beforemath  dissatisfaction 
june 2012 by jerryking
How pizza delivers innovation - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 03, 2012 |Globe and Mail | by Todd Hirsch

Argues that as unemployment benefits expire, there aren’t too many jobs available, so very low-skill, unappealing jobs – pizza delivery, gas station attendant, etc. – will be reconsidered. Skilled Americans accustomed to much higher wages will find themselves accepting these low-paying jobs. On the surface, that’s bad news. What a waste of education and skill!

But within the husk of this sad state of underemployment lie the seeds of a whole new wave of innovation and creativity. Smart workers who find themselves in these menial jobs will say, “I could do better” or “I can do this differently” or “I have an idea that will revolutionize pizza delivery.” New businesses will be created, many of them improving on the old business models that dominated the pre-Internet age.

This is how economic innovation works. Clever people come up with ideas, which turn into business ventures, which then turn into the economic drivers of tomorrow.
innovation  unemployment  creativity  reinvention  low_skilled  business_models  smart_people  menial  new_businesses  Todd_Hirsch  underemployment  dissatisfaction  ideas  bad_news 
january 2012 by jerryking
Jobs's Legacy: Changing How We Live - WSJ.com
AUGUST 25, 2011 | WSJ | By WALT MOSSBERG. Jobs changed the
way people live by being willing to take big risks on new ideas, and not
be satisfied with small innovations fed by market research. He insisted
on high quality and had the guts to leave out features others found
essential and to kill technologies, e.g. the floppy drive & the
removable battery. [JCK: An example of "culling"?] And he has been a brilliant marketer, personally
passionate about his products.. he introduced the dominant digital music
player, the iPod, & created the most successful digital media
service, iTunes. He introduced the first super-smartphone, the iPhone,
the only truly successful tablet computer, the iPad, which is in the
process of replacing the laptop, at least in part. He built the world's
largest app store and he built a phenomenally successful chain of retail
stores, too.

Jobs has dramatically changed the mobile phone industry, the music
industry, the film and TV industries, the publishing industry and
others.
Apple  breakthroughs  CEOs  culling  dissatisfaction  gut_feelings  high-quality  imagination  legacies  marginal_improvements  moonshots  resignations  risk-taking  Steve_Jobs  Walter_Mossberg 
august 2011 by jerryking
Stop Looking for Ideas, Look for Problems to Grow Your Business - India Chief Mentor - WSJ
April 19, 2010, | WSJ | By Gautam Gandhi. Stop looking for
good ideas. That’s right, you read this correctly. Please don’t speak of good ideas ever again. Instead tell me about good problems. They'll most likely bring a business opportunity, Where are the problems?

If you look around there are problems everywhere. Question things you
take for granted and think to yourself: Is there a better way? When you
have your next business meeting, whether it is with a client or
customer, ask them what their biggest problems are. You will be
surprised by what people tell you. Hopefully, you will start to notice
patterns and will soon identify a problem to solve. Better still, if it
is a problem that affects you directly.

When you think of the problem that you are going to solve, ensure that:

You are tackling it for a sizable market
People are willing to pay for your solution
You assess your rivals

The last one is important. Never think: “I don’t have any competition.”
growth  problem_solving  pattern_recognition  idea_generation  problems  challenges  worthiness  messiness  uncharted_problems  large_markets  competition  questions  ideas  assumptions  criteria  India  pain_points  discernment  curiosity  dissatisfaction  opportunities  inquisitiveness  Michael_McDerment  worthwhile_problems 
july 2011 by jerryking
The builder who revived a beloved brand brick by brick
Jul 18, 2011 FT. Andrew Ward. Jorgen Vig Knudstorp ; CEO Lego.
as head of the Danish toy maker, he helped restore the fortunes of a
national institution...Knudstorp saw that painful measures were needed
to turn the company around: layoffs, some mfg. was off shored to eastern
Europe & Mexico, and asset sales of theme parks & non-core
products....One of the hardest challenges for any CEO is to get to the
truth of what a biz is doing right & wrong - & to avoid
complacency when things are going well. Don`t dismiss the 1 % who
complain. Listen extra hard to that 1% because they usually represent a
much bigger proportion of silent unhappiness."

Lego tries to get at the truth by basing a large proportion of managers'
bonuses on customer satisfaction surveys of retailers, parents &
children...Knudstorp maintains a wide netwk of global business &
academic contacts from his time at McK and, before that, at biz schools
in Denmark, the UK & US, and describes himself an eclectic reader.
ProQuest  Lego  CEOs  Denmark  Danish  turnarounds  family-owned_businesses  theme_parks  toys  latent  hidden  complacency  customer_satisfaction  McKinsey  dissatisfaction  complaints  unhappiness 
july 2011 by jerryking
Zadie Smith's rules for writers | Books | guardian.co.uk
22 Feb. 2010 / guardian.co.uk/ Here are Zadie Smith's golden
rules for writing:
1 As a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing
this than anything else.
2 As an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it,
better still, as an enemy would.
3 Don't romanticise your "vocation". You can either write good sentences
or you can't. What matters is what is left on the pg.
4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without dismissing the things you
don't excel at.
5 Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. Crowds won't make your writing any
better than it is.
7 Work disconnected from the ­Web.
8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away
from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9 Don't confuse honours with achievement.
10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it.
Accept the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.
writing  advice  writers  tips  reading  books  quotes  rules_of_the_game  affirmations  weaknesses  truth-telling  restlessness  dissatisfaction  golden_rules 
may 2011 by jerryking

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