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jerryking : dissension   21

We cannot win if we do not like each other
May 6 2018 | Sunday Stabroek | by Ian McDonald.

When I was a schoolboy we had a games-master named Mr. Wilkinson who had served the College for all eternity. I suppose he must have been in his fi...
Guyana  Guyanese  partisanship  national_unity  factionalism  dissension  ethnic_divisions  politics  intolerance  incivility  mistrust  personal_animosity  personal_invective 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Dying Art of Disagreement
SEPT. 24, 2017 | The New York Times | Bret Stephens.

The title of my talk tonight is “The Dying Art of Disagreement.”.......But to say, I disagree; I refuse; you’re wrong; etiam si omnes — ego non — these are the words that define our individuality, give us our freedom, enjoin our tolerance, enlarge our perspectives, seize our attention, energize our progress, make our democracies real, and give hope and courage to oppressed people everywhere. Galileo and Darwin; Mandela, Havel, and Liu Xiaobo; Rosa Parks and Natan Sharansky — such are the ranks of those who disagree......The polarization is geographic.......The polarization is personal........Finally the polarization is electronic and digital, .......What we did was read books that raised serious questions about the human condition, and which invited us to attempt to ask serious questions of our own. Education, in this sense, wasn’t a “teaching” with any fixed lesson. It was an exercise in interrogation.

To listen and understand; to question and disagree; to treat no proposition as sacred and no objection as impious; to be willing to entertain unpopular ideas and cultivate the habits of an open mind ....uChicago showed us something else: that every great idea is really just a spectacular disagreement with some other great idea....to disagree well you must first understand well. You have to read deeply, listen carefully, watch closely. You need to grant your adversary moral respect; give him the intellectual benefit of doubt; have sympathy for his motives and participate empathically with his line of reasoning. And you need to allow for the possibility that you might yet be persuaded of what he has to say........there’s such a thing as private ownership in the public interest, and of fiduciary duties not only to shareholders but also to citizens. Journalism is not just any other business, like trucking or food services. .....But no country can have good government, or a healthy public square, without high-quality journalism — journalism that can distinguish a fact from a belief and again from an opinion; that understands that the purpose of opinion isn’t to depart from facts but to use them as a bridge to a larger idea called “truth”; and that appreciates that truth is a large enough destination that, like Manhattan, it can be reached by many bridges of radically different designs. In other words, journalism that is grounded in facts while abounding in disagreements.

I believe it is still possible — and all the more necessary — for journalism to perform these functions, especially as the other institutions that were meant to do so have fallen short. But that requires proprietors and publishers who understand that their role ought not to be to push a party line, or be a slave to Google hits and Facebook ads, or provide a titillating kind of news entertainment, or help out a president or prime minister who they favor or who’s in trouble.

Their role is to clarify the terms of debate by championing aggressive and objective news reporting, and improve the quality of debate with commentary that opens minds and challenges assumptions rather than merely confirming them.

This is journalism in defense of liberalism, not liberal in the left-wing American or right-wing Australian sense, but liberal in its belief that the individual is more than just an identity, and that free men and women do not need to be protected from discomfiting ideas and unpopular arguments. More than ever, they need to be exposed to them, so that we may revive the arts of disagreement that are the best foundation of intelligent democratic life.
assumptions  Bret_Stephens  civics  Colleges_&_Universities  courage  critical_thinking  dangerous_ideas  demagoguery  difficult_conversations  disagreements  discomforts  dissension  dual-consciousness  free_speech  good_governance  high-quality  identity_politics  journalism  liberalism  open_mind  polarization  the_human_condition  uChicago 
september 2017 by jerryking
Review: ‘Winter is Coming’, by Garry Kasparov
NOVEMBER 8, 2015 | FT | Review by John Thornhill

‘Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped’, by Garry Kasparov, Atlantic Books, £16.99; Public Affairs, $26.99

"The price of deterrence always goes up"

the real power of Kasparov’s book lies in his argument that the west must pursue a more assertive and moral foreign policy, something that has faded out of fashion. In his view, the most moral foreign policy is also the most effective. It enhances international security by insisting on observance of law....one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.

in Kasparov’s view, US President Bill Clinton squandered the chance to advance the international human rights agenda in the 1990s, as the west took a holiday from history. And today the west is too “uninformed, callous, or apathetic” to assert its influence and values.

He, rightly, argues that one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.
books  Russia  Vladimir_Putin  book_reviews  authors  writers  dictators  dictatorships  deterrence  dissension  Ukraine  human_rights  strategic_thinking  autocracies  chess  authoritarianism  foreign_policy  geopolitics  liberal_pluralism  rogue_actors  Garry_Kasparov  consistency  exile 
january 2017 by jerryking
Eight steps to making better decisions as a manager - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, May 08, 2016

Write down the key facts that need to be considered. Too often we jump into decisions and ignore the obvious.

Write down five pre-existing goals or priorities that will be affected by the decision.

Write down realistic alternatives – at least three, but ideally four or more.

Write down what’s missing. Information used to be scarce. Now it’s so abundant it can distract us from checking what’s missing (jk: i.e. the commoditization of information)

Write down the impact your decision will have one year in the future. By thinking a year out, you are separating yourself from the immediate moment, lessening emotions. [Reminiscent of Suzy Welch’s 10-10-10 rule. When you’re about to make a decision, ask yourself how you will feel about it 10 minutes from now? 10 months from now? and 10 years from now? People are overly biased by the immediate pain of some choice, but they can put the short-term pain in long-term perspective by asking these questions].

Involve at least two more people in the decision but no more than six additional team members. This ensures less bias, more perspectives, and since more people contributed to the decision, increased buy-in when implementing it.

Write down what was decided, as well as why and how much the team supports the decision.

Schedule a follow-up in one to two months.
Harvey_Schachter  decision_making  goals  buy-in  options  unknowns  following_up  note_taking  dissension  perspectives  biases  information_gaps  long-term  dispassion  alternatives  think_threes  unsentimental  Suzy_Welch  commoditization_of_information  process-orientation 
may 2016 by jerryking
Three tough conversations every leader must face - The Globe and Mail
SUMI KRISHNAN
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Monday, Dec. 01 2014,

Difficult discussion No. 1: Addressing opposition from your team As your company grows and adapts to new challenges, you’ll inevitably need to pivot your business strategy. But with change can come opposition.

Difficult discussion No. 2: Warning slacking virtual or part-time employees Despite the many benefits of working with virtual employees, falling into the trap of “out of sight, out of mind” can make it difficult to manage them effectively.

When employees aren’t accomplishing their tasks, it’s important that you don’t wait for them to self-correct. It’s easy to let too much time go by and suddenly find yourself buried beneath a mountain of issues. Instead, approach each challenge immediately. It will save you months of headaches.

Difficult discussion No. 3: Telling an employee and friend that she’s slacking It’s hard to work with family, but it’s just as hard to work with friends. When your employees become your good friends, oftentimes they’ll start to take your requirements or expectations for granted.
leaders  CEOs  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  candour  stressful  think_threes  dissension  difficult_conversations 
december 2014 by jerryking
Assassination in Africa: Inside the plots to kill Rwanda’s dissidents - The Globe and Mail
GEOFFREY YORK AND JUDI REVER
PRETORIA and BRUSSELS — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 02 2014
Geoffrey_York  Africa  Rwanda  assassinations  dissension  targeted_assassinations 
may 2014 by jerryking
Bob Pittman of Clear Channel, on the Value of Dissent - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: November 16, 2013
discussing an idea, “What did the dissenter say?” The first time you do that, somebody might say, “Well, everybody’s on board.” Then I’ll say, “Well, you guys aren’t listening very well, because there’s always another point of view somewhere and you need to go back and find out what the dissenting point of view is.” I don’t want to hear someone say after we do something, “Oh, we should have done this.”

I want us to listen to these dissenters because they may intend to tell you why we can’t do something, but if you listen hard, what they’re really telling you is what you must do to get something done....“You’ll never be fired here for making a mistake. You’ll be fired for not making a mistake. Because if you’re not making a mistake, it tells me that you’re not trying anything new.”...“Weed the garden.” If you try 10 new things and, just for example, two are clear winners and two are clear losers. That means you’ve got six in between. What do I do with those? Most organizations — and when I’m not careful, including me — let everything live except the clear losers....only going to let clear winners live. I’m going to take the resources I put for the other eight things and try again,”...

Urgency wins. There are times when people come in with a presentation, and I’ll say: “What is it you want from me? What is the decision?” I find 70 percent of the time, I don’t need to know any of the other stuff. I’ll just say, “Do this or that” and we’ve saved 50 minutes. Although it may come across as impatience, it really allows us to move faster.
Clear_Channel  attrition_rates  CEOs  dissension  impatience  portfolios  kill_rates  momentum  operational_tempo  urgency 
november 2013 by jerryking
We should learn the lessons of history - Stabroek News - Guyana
February 28, 2011

Set aside whether the major uprising of 1763 was on February 23, or as some argue February 27, 1763 [Ed note: There is no dispute among historians in the field that the correct date is February 27], it was the valiant effort of a brutalized enslaved people to secure their God-given rights of freedom, human dignity and justice.
Their initial efforts and failures have many important lessons for all of us, in particular those who still hunger for real freedom, human dignity and justice, three pillars upon which to build sustainable peace and progress. I hope and pray that this generation can overcome a serious weakness noticeable throughout history; it is where rational people and their leaders seem unable to learn from the many lessons of history.
Why did Chiang Kai Shek fail to listen to voices calling for change until it was all too late? Why did King George III and his cabinet take the path of coercion instead of conciliation with the American colonies? And just these past few weeks we witnessed a stubborn Egyptian leader exit.
But the lesson – the cause of the 1763 failure was primarily due to a familiar form of folly – failing, as we say to keep their eyes on the ball, and learning from previous failed attempts for freedom. The leaders of the new ‘freed slave’ state set up by them after chasing their European oppressors, failed because of disunity, and a failure to appreciate the wisdom to set aside all differences – I mean all real or perceived personal differences – and accept that all of their energies ought to be concentrated on the total elimination of the cruel system which they faced.
letters_to_the_editor  disunity  Afro-Guyanese  history  Guyanese  Guyana  dissension  lessons_learned  personal_animosity  personal_invective  fallacies_follies  personal_sacrifice 
february 2011 by jerryking
Frank: The Economic Crisis: Lessons Unlearned - WSJ.com
AUGUST 11, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By THOMAS FRANK.
That Republicans have succeeded in blaming government is testimony to
their political brilliance.
Thomas_Frank  lessons_learned  liberal  commentators  dissension  WSJ 
august 2010 by jerryking
U.S.-Iran Feud Hits L.A. - WSJ.com
MAY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | TAMARA AUDI. Tehran Seeks
Crackdown on Dissidents in City; 'We Are Not Soldiers,' Group SaysBy
Iran  Diaspora  expatriates  Iranians  dissension 
may 2010 by jerryking
Walk without talk
March 29, 2010 | Stabroek News | Dave Martin. Op-ed on Caribbean unity--or lack thereof.
Caribbean  unity  regional  history  dissension  disunity  Caricom  dissolutions  Dave_Martins 
march 2010 by jerryking
China's Web Crackdown Continues
Jan. 11, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | L. Gordon Crovitz
China  censorship  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  copyright  dissension 
january 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - John Chambers of Cisco - Treasure Your Setbacks - Question - NYTimes.com
Aug. 1, 2009 | New York Times | Interview w. John Chambers,
chairman and CEO, Cisco Systems, conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.
(1) We’re products of the challenges faced in life; (2) Becoming a
great company involves encountering major setbacks--near-death
experiences--and overcoming them; (3) During stressful events, it’s
valuable to be your calmest, most analytical self; (4) Today’s world
requires a different leadership style — more collaboration and teamwork
including using Web 2.0 tech; (5) Build relationships with people who
have dramatically different views from yours by identifying and focusing
on areas shared in common; (6) Moving too slow or moving too fast
without process behind it are both dangerous; (7) Interview questions -
tell me about your results;your mistakes and failures-what would you do
differently this time? who are the best people you recruited and
developed-where are they today? Customer-oriented? Good listeners?
Domain expertise? Sports played?
Cisco  CEOs  leadership  lessons_learned  interviews  hiring  interview_preparation  John_Chambers  setbacks  teams  stressful  resilience  bouncing_back  collaboration  dual-consciousness  dangers  internal_systems  relationships  calm  industry_expertise  dissension  process-orientation 
august 2009 by jerryking

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