recentpopularlog in

jerryking : distribution_channels   42

Walmart Expands Online Grocery Delivery to 100 Cities - The New York Times
By TIFFANY HSU and NICK WINGFIELD MARCH 14, 2018

“There is a lot of experimenting going on as everyone tries to figure out that last-mile delivery — it’s a tough economic equation to make work,” said Mike Knemeyer, a professor of logistics at Ohio State University. “But if you can, you’ll have a big head start on the others, and you’ll end up making money not just in groceries but on all of the things that you sell.”

The nexus of e-commerce and grocery sales is increasingly appealing to retailers.
Wal-Mart  home-delivery  e-commerce  grocery  supermarkets  Amazon  Whole_Foods  distribution_channels  logistics  same-day  delivery_networks  last_mile 
march 2018 by jerryking
FedEx Says Retailers Should Be Paying More for Web Delivery - WSJ
By LAURA STEVENS
Updated March 16, 2016

FedEx Corp. executives said retailers should be paying more for shipments to help offset the cost of expanding its network to meet the growing demands of e-commerce.....FedEx CFO Alan Graf said that it is important for the price of shipping an e-commerce package to reflect the effort it takes to deliver it. “We can’t build these networks and spend this kind of capital and not get a return on it,” Mr. Graf said in an interview....Mr. Smith said he thought it was unbelievable that some have suggested that Amazon would be able to build out a network to compete with FedEx and rival United Parcel Service Inc.

Just because Amazon has created a network of warehouses to support its retail operations, doesn’t mean that could translate to something akin to FedEx’s massive network for deliveries, Mr. Smith said. “The key driver of any delivery system is route density and revenue per delivery stop,” he said....One way that FedEx intends to boost its e-commerce returns is by increasing fees attached to the growing number of large shipments such as kayaks and other items that don’t fit into its ground network.

Mr. Smith blamed some of the trend in low-cost e-commerce expectations on the U.S. Postal Service, which it and other delivery companies, including UPS and Amazon, use to deliver packages the most expensive leg of the trip—to resident’s doors....
Fedex  e-commerce  retailers  shippers  package_delivery  couriers  return_on_effort  Amazon  UPS  USPS  last_mile  logistics  distribution_channels  delivery_networks  route_density 
march 2016 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking retail sector - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA
The incredible shrinking retail sector
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 12 2015

Entire categories of products are moving online, making many bricks-and-mortar stores redundant. Video and book stores are all but gone. Office supply, electronics and department stores are in retreat. A future without auto showrooms and movie theatres may be coming.

The era of the big-box store has peaked as city dwellers move back downtown, where space is at a premium.
Barrie_McKenna  retailers  size  mergers_&_acquisitions  downsizing  small_spaces  grocery  supermarkets  pharmacies  proximity  convenience_stores  store_footprints  post-deal_integration  bricks-and-mortar  consolidation  distribution_channels  Target  Wal-Mart  Loblaws  competitive_landscape  e-commerce  fresh_produce  perishables  big-box  supply_chains 
february 2015 by jerryking
Can Wal-Mart Clerks Ship as Fast as Amazon Robots? - WSJ
Dec. 18, 2014 | WSJ | By SHELLY BANJO, SUZANNE KAPNER and PAUL ZIOBRO.

The fast rise of rivals like Amazon.com Inc. and a far reaching change in shoppers’ habits has made it obvious that traditional retailers need to compete online. The trickier question is how to pull it off. Retailers’ answer is something called “omnichannel”—an attempt to use one set of inventory and assets to fill all orders.

The plan is driven by economic reality. Companies that already spend heavily maintaining thousands of stores aren’t able or willing to shell out the billions of dollars necessary to replicate Amazon’s 135-plus network of warehouses and fill them with inventory. While they are building distribution centers, they also hope some sweater sets can be shipped to online customers from a local Macy’s , or that Internet shoppers will pick up the television they ordered at a nearby Target.

Retailers are relying on the approach more heavily than ever this holiday season. It makes perfect sense in theory. In practice, though, the efficiencies possible in tightly packed, highly automated warehouse are hard to reproduce with inventory spread across stores built for live customers. Workarounds run up against space constraints, and items aren’t always where computer algorithms predict them to be.

“This is the first year,” said Jason Goldberger, head of Target.com, which is shipping orders from 136 of the company’s 1,800 U.S. stores. “We’ll learn.”

Big retailers have thousands of often sizable stores built near where their customers live. But the chains were built decades ago on a hub-and-spoke model. Pallets of goods were trucked to centralized warehouses. From there, boxes were sorted and transported to thousands of stores. Now with e-commerce, retailers are faced with delivering millions of items to millions of customer homes.
Wal-Mart  Amazon  omnichannel  distribution_channels  hub-and-spoke  retailers  supply_chains  e-commerce  automation  distribution_centres 
december 2014 by jerryking
Redefining ‘made in China’: How one firm is forging a new path for manufacturers - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2014 | G&M | NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE.

CFmoto has obsessed about quality, devoting nearly a fifth of its 1,350-person work force to research and development, and buying dozens of robotic CNC machines to sculpt its own key components. It has built dealer networks around the world – and sales, too. Eighty per cent of its revenues now come from exports

“We have a different way of thinking from others,” Mr. Lai said. “We want to create fun for our customers.”....China is already the world’s motorcycle factory. Last year, nearly 23 million were built by hundreds of Chinese companies – some sprawling state-owned enterprises, some barely larger than a backyard shed....But that business model is beginning to tatter, as South American and Eastern European consumers gain the wealth to buy cars, and competition steps in. ...“Now they’re looking another way at it – and mainly because of the threat from the Indian industry in their established markets.”....The Chinese situation is, of course, different: Where Japanese and Korean companies built their skill inside markets largely protected from foreign competition, China today is wide open to imported brands, which have been hugely successful. Cars bearing a mainland mark now account for only 23 per cent of sales.....But western markets have remained largely impenetrable: after years of splashy introductions at the Detroit Motor Show that date back to 2006, Chinese brands are no closer to making their big North American entrance....China’s experience with motorcycles, however, shows the distance it has to go. In their bid to increase quality, companies have outfitted their products with foreign-made suspensions, brakes and fuel systems....“demand for design is shifting” to Asia....He faults an inability among many Chinese firms to create their own identity, which can translate into a uniqueness that customers can latch onto.
China  manufacturers  motorcycles  design  value_chains  branding  brands  quality  automotive_industry  copycats  dealerships  distribution_channels 
december 2014 by jerryking
Sysco to Buy US Foods for $3.5 Billion to Create Food-Distribution Giant - WSJ.com
By
Annie Gasparro,
Sarah E. Needleman
and
Ryan Dezember
connect
Updated Dec. 11, 2013
The two biggest U.S. food-distribution companies announced a merger that will create a giant with about $65 billion in annual revenue and enhanced clout over purchasing by institutions ranging from restaurants and hotels to hospitals and schools.

Sysco Corp. SYY 0.00% said it will buy rival US Foods for $3.5 billion, uniting two middlemen that are already central players in the service economy. Sysco alone has about 425,000 customers, and it and US Foods together collected about 27% of the revenue in the U.S. food-distribution market last year, according to research firm Technomic Inc....Founded in 1969, Sysco has grown to 48,100 employees world-wide, thanks in part to acquisitions of smaller regional players. But the US Foods deal is by far its largest to date.

Sysco considered buying US Foods almost seven years ago but didn't. Mr. DeLaney said the change of heart came because US Foods became a more efficient company.

He said US Foods has technology related to customer ordering and a mobile application that Sysco is interested in.
Sysco  food  foodservice  distribution_channels  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Clayton_Dubilier_Rice  KKR  middlemen 
december 2013 by jerryking
In War for Same-Day Delivery, Racing Madly to Go Last Mile - NYTimes.com
November 23, 2013 | NYT | By HILARY STOUT.

That personal, labor-intensive approach doesn’t translate easily into profit. “You just can’t get any hourly worker at Popeyes to do this — you need someone with a work ethic and a sense of urgency and a willingness to go out of the standard operating procedure to delight the customer,” said Sucharita Mulpuru, a retail analyst at Forrester Research. “It is an H.R. issue, not a tech issue. Many of these companies are coming at it from a tech standpoint.”
Amazon  eBay  eBay_Now  concierge_services  shippers  delivery_networks  package_delivery  instant_gratification  last_mile  distribution_channels  work_ethic  urgency  same-day  delighting_customers  hourly_workers  labor-intensive  home-delivery  fulfillment 
november 2013 by jerryking
Starbucks can stomach Kraft $2.8-billion coffee jolt - The Globe and Mail
Kevin Allison
Starbucks can stomach Kraft $2.8-billion coffee jolt Add to ...
Subscribers Only

CHICAGO — Reuters Breakingviews

Published Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013,
Starbucks  Kraft  Pepsi  coffee  distribution_channels  disputes  grocery  supermarkets 
november 2013 by jerryking
What sent Shoppers and Loblaw down the aisle? Wal-Mart - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 19 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Sylvain Charlebois.

Wal-Mart’s purchase of Woolco in 1994 remains the most transformational transaction in Canada’s food retailing industry. Everything happening in food distribution today continues to be affected by it. Most Canadians didn’t realize it then, but Wal-Mart’s entrance into the Canadian market would change everything: the way we shop; what we buy; and, most importantly, how we buy and value food.

Ever since Wal-Mart entered the Canadian market, it never hid its ambition of becoming Canada’s top food retailer, as it has in the United States.
Shoppers  Loblaws  mergers_&_acquisitions  Sylvain_Charlebois  M&A  food  distribution_channels  Wal-Mart  grocery  supermarkets  retailers  Quebec  Sobeys  Target 
july 2013 by jerryking
Unlikely expansion: When retail brands go wholesale -
Apr. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER.

Aldo Group Inc. is on the hunt for retail space – inside the stores of other retailers, as the shoe specialist pursues a cost-conscious expansion in which it is teaming up with a growing roster of indirect rivals.

Merchants ranging from Aldo to fashion purveyor Joe Fresh (owned by grocery giant Loblaw Cos. Ltd.), Reitmans (Canada) Ltd. and Hudson’s Bay Co., have stepped up their partnering efforts, even as they raise the stakes by being tied to sometimes unstable chains....multichannel distribution allows rapid expansion into new markets without the expense or time needed to open new stores....Retailers are trying to cash in on brand awareness and production expertise to reach more customers in a cost-savvy way. But the business model isn’t without drawbacks, as merchants lose some control over the placement, prominence and marketing of their products....For years, in a reverse trend, manufacturers – from Nine West to Apple – have set up their own standalone stores to showcase their products and ensure their brands are not lost among many others within a larger retailer.

“Retailers want to be wholesalers and wholesalers want to be retailers,” Mr. Lichtszral said. “The lines are blurred everywhere … Wholesale distributors are opening their own websites and shipping directly to the consumer and, in doing that, are technically competing with their retail customers.”
growth  retailers  brands  distribution_channels  Aldo  Loblaws  Nine_West  Apple  wholesalers  multichannel  omnichannel  Joe_Fresh  partnerships  Reitmans  HBC  business_models  drawbacks  merchandising  manufacturers  expansions  store_within_a_store  cost-consciousness  Marina_Strauss  standalone  Fortune_500 
may 2013 by jerryking
New Rules for Bringing Innovations to Market
March 2004 | HBR | Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The more networked a market is, the harder it is for an innovation to take hold, writes Bhaskar Chakravorti, who leads Monitor Group's practice on strategies for growth and managing uncertainty through the application of game theory. Chakravorti argues that executives need to rethink the way they bring innovations to market, specifically by orchestrating behavior change across the market, so that a large number of players adopt their offerings and believe they are better off for having done so. He outlines a four-part framework for doing just that: The innovator must reason back from a target endgame, implementing only those strategies that maximize its chances of getting to its goal. It must complement power players, positioning its innovation as an enhancement to their products or services. The innovator must offer coordinated switching incentives to three core groups: the players that add to the innovation's benefits, the players that act as channels to adopters and the adopters themselves. And it must preserve flexibility in case its initial strategy fails.

Chakravorti uses Adobe's introduction of its Acrobat software as an example of an innovator that took into account other players in the network--and succeeded because of it. As more content became available in Acrobat format, more readers were motivated to download the program," he observes. "The flexibility in Acrobat's product structure and the segmentation in the market allowed the pricing elasticity that resulted in the software's widespread adoption."
HBR  innovation  networks  network_effects  rules_of_the_game  commercialization  monetization  product_launches  howto  growth  managing_uncertainty  cloud_computing  endgame  Adobe  uncertainty  switching_costs  jump-start  platforms  orchestration  ecosystems  big_bang  behaviours  behavioral_change  frameworks  sharing_economy  customer_adoption  thinking_backwards  new_categories  early_adopters  distribution_channels  work-back_schedules 
july 2012 by jerryking
Distribution and entrepreneurship
9 Sep 2004 | Industrial Distribution |Jack Keough

The entrepreneurial spirit lives on in industrial distribution. Despite the consolidation that has occurred in the industrial distribution marketplace, most distribution companies are still independent, family-owned businesses. In fact, Industrial Distribution's 58th Annual Survey of Distributor Operations shows that nearly 78% of distributorships are still family-owned enterprises. It's equally important to note that many of these companies have been around for more than 50 years, and some - 2% of the 800 respondents - have passed the century mark. But there are still a number of distributorships that have started up in the past several years.
ProQuest  distribution_channels  entrepreneurship  family-owned_businesses 
june 2012 by jerryking
Move Over, Coke - WSJ.com
January 30, 2006 | WSJ | By GWENDOLYN BOUNDS | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

How a small beverage maker managed to win shelf space in one of the most brutally competitive industries
Gwendolyn_Bounds  beverages  shelf_space  Coca-Cola  grocery  Pepsi  fees_&_commissions  branding  distribution_channels  water 
may 2012 by jerryking
Finding a New Niche May Offer Better Chance at Fat Margins - WSJ.com
May 13, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
These days, with information and capital zipping around at warp speed, a business or industry with fat margins essentially has a target painted on its back.

And yet, plenty of small and midsize companies in less-than-glamorous industries manage, some year after year, to post enviable margins. Some have patents or other intellectual property that protect them from competition. Others have invested large sums in plant and equipment to acquire economies of scale that scare off new market entrants. Some defend themselves by knitting together extensive sales-and-distribution networks that would take years to replicate.
patents  intellectual_property  entrepreneur  business_models  dealerships  automotive_industry  barcodes  medical_devices  hospitals  niches  unglamorous  differentiation  proprietary  small_business  mid-market  barriers_to_entry  economies_of_scale  margins  warp_speed  defensive_tactics  distribution_channels 
may 2012 by jerryking
Open Data in Agriculture and Why It Matters
July 16, 2010 | Food+Tech Connect | By Elizabeth Mcvay Greene.

With capabilities like social media that offers instantaneous mini-reports, remote sensing that announces field-level conditions, and user-generated mapping that offers an on-the-ground view of production, merchandising, and consumption activity, we are beginning to get the tools at our fingertips to optimize decision-making with connected, real-time information, not just intuition...don't want farmers’ wisdom to evaporate in the face of technology. Quite the contrary, we want that specialized knowledge of acre, crop, and herd to be augmented and preserved....If a farmer needs to decide how much to irrigate during a drought. It’s a decision that affects just his farm in the short run, but has systemic costs and benefits. If the farmer could connect historical commodity prices, weather charts, financial and environmental costs, and soil conditions to assess the trade-offs in the choice he makes, he could complement his highly refined intuition with the long-term effects that his decision has on his farm and beyond. The more widely information and tools like this are available, the more optimal decisions participants can make throughout the food system.
open_source  agriculture  farming  data  distribution_channels  tools  supply_chains  massive_data_sets  open_data  wisdom  intuition  real-time 
april 2012 by jerryking
Kraft Seeks Arbitration in Distribution Dispute With Starbucks - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2010 | WSJ | Paul Ziobro. Kraft Foods Inc.
launched arbitration proceedings against Starbucks Corp. on Monday,
challenging the coffee giant's plan to end a distribution deal with
Kraft.

The move will send the dispute between the two companies to an
arbitration panel as Starbucks looks to sever an arrangement it's had
with Kraft since 1998 to distribute Starbucks bagged coffee to
supermarket and other retailers.

Kraft is looking to enforce certain provisions of the deal, including
getting Starbucks to pay for ending a business that generated $500
million in annual revenue. Analysts have estimated that the business
could be valued north of $1.5 billion.
Kraft  Starbucks  arbitration  disputes  distribution_channels 
july 2011 by jerryking
Getting Goods on Store Shelves - WSJ.com
* MARCH 13, 2011

For entrepreneurs with products to sell, a wide range of sales channels
abound -- from boutiques to big-box stores to online marketplaces. But
identifying appropriate retailers -- and striking deals with them -- can
be a challenging first-time endeavor. Experts say the best strategy is
to research venues that are a strong fit and prepare a compelling and
succinct sales pitch.

*
By SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN
distribution_channels  Sarah_E._Needleman  small_business  shelf_space  big-box  retailers 
march 2011 by jerryking
RETHINKING EVERY RULE OF REINVENTION
May 1, 2006 | Advertising Age | by Scott Bedbury. Great
brands like Nike and Starbucks have transcended the commodity nature of
their categories and become global brand leaders. Essential to both
brands is a nontraditional view toward marketing, particularly in the
area of consumer research, and a cultural commitment to risk taking and
the inevitable mistakes that happen through continuous innovation. For
these brands reinvention is not a one-time event but an ongoing
commitment. Here are four things to keep in mind as you consider ways to
reinvent your brand: 1. Study your competition above all else. 2. Test
your way into it. 3. Think in terms of current distribution. 4. Avoid
mistakes.
consumer_research  branding  risk-taking  incrementalism  innovation  reinvention  Nike  Starbucks  organizational_culture  brands  experimentation  trial_&_error  competition  distribution_channels 
january 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Business Life - Fashion retailer cuts a dash online
June 3 2008 19:34 | Last updated: June 3 2008 19:34| Financial Times| By Adrian Michaels in Milan
distribution
online_marketing  fashion  distribution_channels  entrepreneur  Yoox  distribution  e-commerce 
march 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read