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jerryking : downtime   7

Is This the Start of Better Airport Shopping in the U.S.? - WSJ
By Scott McCartney
March 14, 2018

In the age of online shopping, retailers are finding that airports can take some of the sting out of declining mall traffic. Travelers have time to kill [JCK: "downtime"] and money to spend when they’re captive inside airport security. Major airports around the world, from Singapore to Dubai, London to Beijing, have essentially become shopping malls with gates.......Airports like duty-free shops because they get a cut of the revenue; luxury-goods makers like the chance to interact in person with shoppers; and customers like the convenience, savings and opportunity for capricious purchases.....“The variety is good,” he says. “I don’t know if the prices are good, but the convenience is.”

Name-brand cosmetics and perfumes especially can be cheaper at the airport, with special packages, quantities and, for some brands, unique products. Other items can be hit and miss.....Airport customer research showed a hunger for high-end retail catering to expense-account business travelers and vacationers dubbed “indulgent explorers,” who are willing to spend on unique items, especially local brands. .......Moët Hennessy, the Paris-based maker of Champagne and cognac, has a boutique in the Dallas duty-free store where it does tastings of rare editions—a spot of cognac before boarding. The unit of luxury-goods conglomerate LVMH sees airport retail as a chance to educate consumers about its brand. ....DFW's duty free mall store has no doors; travelers just wander through. Brands have their own areas, creating a boutique feel. There is some seating upstairs on an open, second level designed for events such as tastings, entertainment and parties that will lure curious passengers.

While online retailing has curtailed some airport retail business, companies say they are still seeing growth—stronger than other traditional venues like malls or Main Streets.
airports  brands  convenience  downtime  duty-free  glamour  high-end  luxury  LVMH  retailers  travel 
march 2018 by jerryking
Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe on millennial matchmaking | Evernote Web
18 March / 19 March 2017 | FT| by Alice Fishburn.

. . . Half a year in tech-app time, it’s like a normal-world five years.” What’s the solution? “You just have to run faster than it does.’’
Wolfe has surfed an extraordinary sea-change in how we approach relationships. Our phones now allow us to identify potential life companions through location, ethnic origin or hatred of the same thing and reject them just as quickly. Such opportunities come with a healthy serving of ethical and personal dilemmas.....Bumble’s USP — “truly not a gimmick”, Wolfe stresses, and timely for a feminist age — is that the woman has all the power (while both sexes swipe to show interest, only she can start a conversation). Wolfe may be firmly on-brand but she laughs wickedly at the ambitions of many tech evangelists. “So many entrepreneurs approach me and say, ‘I want to start the next big thing’, and I say, ‘Well, what are you solving?’ And oftentimes they say, ‘Oh, I’m not sure. I want to start something big.’ ” Sigh. “You can never start something big without solving something small, right? And for me, that was not being allowed to text guys first.”.....What has all this time with the data taught her about humans? “You understand when people are the happiest, the most busy, the most detached, most involved.” Sunday nights and Mondays are the busiest times on the site: “I think that’s probably really telling because that’s usually people’s downtime, when they are relaxing or when they’re feeling bummed out . . . a little bit lonely.”
Our view on the idea of technology running our love lives unsurprisingly depends on our culture. One transatlantic dater tells me that, in the US, Bumble is strongly associated with empowered women. In the UK, some moan that it just caters to lazy men.
women  entrepreneur  Tinder  Austin  dating  mobile_applications  relationships  feminism  millennials  match-making  sexism  Silicon_Valley  accelerated_lifecycles  algorithms  gestures  online_dating  downtime 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why Is the McFlurry Machine Down Again? - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Updated Jan. 19, 2017

Last year, downed ice cream machines became the most common service-related complaint among McDonald’s customers on Twitter, according to data analytics firm Quantifind, surpassing the previous year’s sore spot of poor employee attitudes.

McDonald’s doesn’t break out sales of specific menu items. Research firm Technomic Inc. says McFlurrys represent nearly 14% of McDonald’s dessert items that consumers 18 and older purchase for themselves. Other desserts include cookies, ice cream cones and fruit pies.

Joshua Reynolds, head of marketing and client consulting at Quantifind, estimates ice cream desserts make up 3% of the company’s U.S. sales. “I’m not sure how much of that $255 million is melting down the drain, but we know that’s what’s at risk,” he said.
breakdowns  downtime  McDonald's  Flybits  ice_cream  complaints  Quantifind  fast-food 
january 2017 by jerryking
G.E. Looks to Industry for the Next Digital Disruption - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: November 23, 2012

G.E. resides in a different world from the consumer Internet. But the major technologies that animate Google and Facebook are also vital ingredients in the industrial Internet — tools from artificial intelligence, like machine-learning software, and vast streams of new data. In industry, the data flood comes mainly from smaller, more powerful and cheaper sensors on the equipment.

Smarter machines, for example, can alert their human handlers when they will need maintenance, before a breakdown. It is the equivalent of preventive and personalized care for equipment, with less downtime and more output.... Today, G.E. is putting sensors on everything, be it a gas turbine or a hospital bed. The mission of the engineers in San Ramon is to design the software for gathering data, and the clever algorithms for sifting through it for cost savings and productivity gains. Across the industries it covers, G.E. estimates such efficiency opportunities at as much as $150 billion.

Some industrial Internet projects are already under way. First Wind, an owner and operator of 16 wind farms in America, is a G.E. customer for wind turbines. It has been experimenting with upgrades that add more sensors, controls and optimization software.

The new sensors measure temperature, wind speeds, location and pitch of the blades. They collect three to five times as much data as the sensors on turbines of a few years ago, said Paul Gaynor, chief executive of First Wind. The data is collected and analyzed by G.E. software, and the operation of each turbine can be tweaked for efficiency. For example, in very high winds, turbines across an entire farm are routinely shut down to prevent damage from rotating too fast. But more refined measurement of wind speeds might mean only a portion of the turbines need to be shut down. In wintry conditions, turbines can detect when they are icing up, and speed up or change pitch to knock off the ice.

Upgrades on 123 turbines on two wind farms have so far delivered a 3 percent increase in energy output, about 120 megawatt hours per turbine a year. That translates to $1.2 million in additional revenue a year from those two farms, Mr. Gaynor said.

“It’s not earthshaking, but it is meaningful,” he said. “These are real commercial investments for us that make economic sense now.” ...
breakdowns  GE  Industrial_Internet  disruption  Steve_Lohr  sensors  artificial_intelligence  machine_learning  digital_disruption  downtime 
november 2012 by jerryking
Unforeseen consequences - FT.com
May 24, 2007 | Financial Times |By Robert Matthews.

The Germans have a word for it: Schlimmbesserung - literally, a "worse improvement". You may not recognise the word, but you'll know plenty of examples of what it means: efficiency drives that reduce efficiency, cost-cutting measures that prove punitively expensive, software upgrades that cause months of downtime.

All businesses can fall victim to such "revenge effects"....

Edward Tenner, a visiting scholar in the department of history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Why Things Bite Back, the classic study of the phenomenon first published in 1996, believes there are several measures that businesses can take. Indeed, he has given lectures at Microsoft, Intel and AT&T on the subject.

Ensuring there is in-house expertise that can spot emerging revenge effects and deal with the consequences is crucial, Mr Tenner says. "Many companies fail to deal with revenge effects because they are 'outsourcing their brains'," he says. "Lean organisations are supposed to be more flexible, but they may also be giving up a lot of their capability to respond to change."

According to Mr Tenner, businesses can keep a constant watch for reports of potential revenge effects in news and research findings. This has never been easier, thanks to online tools such as Google news alerts and RSS (really simple syndication) feeds.

Even so, revenge effects have a nasty habit of affecting businesses in unexpected ways. "The precondition of vigilance is the selection and development of ability at all levels,"

thinking about the downside to new developments can save a lot of heartache. "Excessive optimism risks revenge effects," he says. "You have to be prepared to work in Murphy's Law mode - and to consider that every possible thing that can go wrong will go wrong."
unintended_consequences  books  limitations  in-house  specificity  outsourcing  unexpected  revenge_effects  Murphy's_Law  thinking_tragically  lean  adaptability  flexibility  responsiveness  change  downtime 
june 2012 by jerryking
How to Succeed in the Age of Going Solo - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By RICHARD
GREENWALD. Anybody can become a consultant. But not everybody does it
well. Here's what you need to know to thrive. (1) Think Long Term.
think in terms of the long haul, preparing for a marathon, not a
sprint.; (2) Join a Network. successful consultants are in a network or
community of consultants. These networks are important sources of new
clients. ; (3) Have Your Own Space; (4) Think Like an Entrepreneur.
Don't drift from project to project. That's a mistake. Have a business
plan or mission statement.
Be known for the work that you do/ don't do. Organizing your business.
Use invoicing software to track billing, don`t mingle personal &
business finances, and keep good records for taxes or expenses. Think of
cash flows, future investments & downtime.
affirmations  howto  solo  freelancing  entrepreneurship  management_consulting  networking  jck  ksfs  long-term  cash_flows  downtime  long-haul 
september 2010 by jerryking
Packed Calendars Rule Over Executives - WSJ.com
June 16, 2008 WSJ column by CAROL HYMOWITZ. CEOs today are
hard pressed to meet of all today's demands from many stakeholders,
while operating under more scrutiny, making themselves more visible, and
making themselves more available. It is difficult to predict months in
advance, when trips are being planned, which customers will be the most
important to see. Importance of scheduling in downtime.
Carol_Hymowitz  leadership  CEOs  time-management  slack_time  calendars  customer_engagement  customer_relationships  customer_visits  downtime 
january 2009 by jerryking

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