recentpopularlog in

jerryking : economic_development   146

« earlier  
Did Burnham err in nationalising sugar and rice? –
Sep 07, 2019 |Kaieteur News | by Peeping Tom.

Did Forbes Burnham err when he nationalised the commanding heights of the economy and removed foreign involvement from the local financial sector?.....If Forbes Burnham erred, it means that the socialist experiment pursued by the PNC was ill-conceived. The fundamental basis of the socialist experiment was both national ownership and control of the main pillars of the Guyanese economy, namely sugar and bauxite. If it was an error to nationalise, then the socialist experiment was a colossal mistake........In making a decision as to whether Guyana should have nationalised the commanding heights of the economy, Forbes Burnham must have considered the ability of locals to manage the industries. Did Guyana at the time have the capacity to manage the industries? Was it a blunder by Forbes Burnham to have concluded that we did when we did not? Forbes Burnham was never in doubt as to the ability of Guyanese. ......Ownership of the commanding sectors of the economy had to be complemented by the Guyanese managing these enterprises. Burnham believed this and died believing this.
He cannot ever be described as a visionary if he was wrong on this score, because this was the main plank of his economic policies and his political beliefs.......If today, however, the PNCR wishes to concede that Burnham erred when he nationalised the commanding heights of the economy, it should then ask itself whether in a globalised world, where the managerial demands are greater, Guyanese can effectively manage their own affairs, more so considering oil and gas will be a major contributor to economic growth over the next 40 years.
It is posited that if Burnham erred by overestimating the local capacity to manage the bauxite and sugar industries, then is it safe to say that Guyanese will be unable to cope with an oil economy.
economic_development  economic_stagnation  Guyana  Guyanese  history  ineptitude  LFSB  nationalizations  oil_industry  PNC 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
How to funnel capital to the American heartland
April 15, 2019 | Financial Times | by Bruce Katz.
* The Innovation Blind Spot, by Ross Baird.
* Ways must be found to rewire money flows in order to reverse the export of wealth
* A federal tax incentive intended to entice coastal capital into the heartland may end up helping to keep local capital local.

Over the past year, economically distressed communities across the US have been engaged in an intense discussion about mobilising private capital. Why? As mayors, governors, real estate developers, entrepreneurs and investors have learnt, buried in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was a provision that created a significant tax incentive to invest in low-income “opportunity zones” across the country......the law’s greatest effect, ironically, has been to unveil a treasure trove of wealth in communities throughout the nation. Some of the country’s largest investors are high-net-worth families in Kansas City, Missouri, and Philadelphia; insurance companies in Erie, Pennsylvania, and Milwaukee; universities in Birmingham, Alabama, and South Bend, Indiana; philanthropists in Cleveland and Detroit; and community foundations and pension funds in every state.

These pillars of wealth mostly invest their market-oriented equity capital outside their own communities, even though their own locales often possess globally significant research institutions, advanced industry companies, grand historic city centres and distinctive ecosystems of entrepreneurs. The wealth-export industry is not a natural phenomenon; it has been led and facilitated by a sophisticated network of wealth management companies, private equity firms, family offices and financial institutions that have narrow definitions of where and in what to invest.

The US, in other words, doesn’t have a capital problem; it has an organisational problem. So how can capital flows be rewired to reverse the export of wealth?

Three things stand out:

(1) Information matters. The opportunity zones incentive has encouraged US cities to create investment prospectuses to promote the competitive assets of their low-income communities and highlight projects that are investor-ready and promise competitive returns.

(2) norms and networks matter. The opportunity zone market will be enhanced by the creation of “capital stacks” that enable the financing of community products such as workforce housing, commercial real estate, small businesses (and minority-owned businesses in particular) and clean energy, to name just a few. Initial opportunity zone projects are already showing creative blends of public, private and civic capital that mix debt, subsidy and equity.

(3) institutions matter. Opportunity zones require cities to create and capitalise new institutions that can deploy capital at scale in sustained ways. Some models already exist. The Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation, backed by patient capital from Procter & Gamble, has driven the regeneration of the Over-the-Rhine neighbourhood during the past 15 years.

More institutional innovation, however, is needed. As Ross Baird, author of The Innovation Blind Spot, has argued, the US must create a new generation of community quarterbacks to provide budding entrepreneurs with business planning and mentoring, matching them with risk-tolerant equity. These efforts will succeed if they unleash the synergies that flow naturally from urban density. New institutions will not have to work alone, but hand-in-glove with the trusted financial firms that manage this locally-generated wealth.
books  capital_flows  cities  coastal_elites  community  economic_development  economically_disadvantaged  economies_of_scale  high_net_worth  howto  industrial_policies  industrial_midwest  industrial_zones  institutions  investors  match-making  midwest  municipalities  networks  network_density  P&G  PPP  packaging  place-based  private_equity  property_development  prospectuses  Red_States  rescue_investing  rust_belt  tax_codes  venture_capital 
april 2019 by jerryking
The APNU+AFC Govt. and African Guyanese: After three years, no major Policy Initiative that targets Black Empowerment – Kaieteur News
May 13, 2018 | | Hinds' Sight with Dr. David Hinds.

Many African Guyanese believe that any criticism of this APNU+AFC government, especially by one of their own, is sinful. This is the very attitude that was exhibited by many Indian Guyanese when the PPP held office and which African Guyanese found revolting. But now, with their government in power, African Guyanese are behaving in the same manner. This hypocrisy by our ethnic communities is at the root of Guyana’s failure to move from the backward politics of colonial domination to a more enlightened politics that embrace equality of opportunity and national consensus as guiding principles. And this failure has impeded economic liberation from poverty and want, and kept us a poor, underdeveloped country.......Most African Guyanese live in the urban areas and in ancestral villages. But these spaces are hardly hubs of economic opportunities. Three years after its assumption of office, there is still no comprehensive Urban and Village renewal initiative. Many African Guyanese villages and communities don’t have markets, for example. Hence, there is little money circulation in those communities.
I know there are many who would say that Village and Urban Renewal are not government business. I beg to disagree. The poor state of those communities is a direct result of government policies, so the repair job must be initiated by government policy.
Afro-Guyanese  economic_empowerment  equality_of_opportunity  Guyana  politics  economically_disadvantaged  economic_development  economic_dynamism  Guyanese  revitalization  institutions  ethnic_communities  David_Hinds  African_Guyanese_villages 
may 2018 by jerryking
Granger addressed a matter of importance to all Guyanese - Stabroek News
By
Staff Writer
August 12, 2015

Pesident Granger’s position at the forum: “salaried employment is very seductive … You can spend out your whole salary because you know next month you will get another salary. If you are a farmer you need to save money for fertilizer, seed, equipment, if there is a drought or a flood you need savings to tide you over but if you are a policeman and there’s a flood you still get paid. Some people do not like to take risks but …unless you change the economy, unless we create people who are entrepreneurs, manufacturers, we will always be victims of people who make decisions for us.”
Afro-Guyanese  cultural_values  David_Granger  economic_development  Guyana  Guyanese  entrepreneurship  Indo-Guyanese  manufacturers  psyche_of_dependency  risk-taking 
august 2015 by jerryking
“It’s symbolic annihilation of history, and it’s done for a purpose. It really enforces white supremacy”: Edward Baptist on the lies we tell about slavery - Salon.com
NOV 9, 2014 01:30 PM EST
“It’s symbolic annihilation of history, and it’s done for a purpose. It really enforces white supremacy”: Edward Baptist on the lies we tell about slavery
Edward Baptist on horrifying truth that we memorialize Confederate soldiers and not Americans who died enslaved
MICHAEL SCHULSON
slavery  the_South  cotton  history  financial_history  economic_development  lying  white_supremacy 
july 2015 by jerryking
My country is what it is because…
JULY 13, 2014 | BY KNEWS | Adam Harris.

Ever since a friend loaned me the book ‘From Third World to First—The Singapore Story: 1965-2000’ I have been looking at my country with a range of emotions. I have felt anger, pity, sorrow, disappointment and shame….Last week, I read a news report prepared by one of my reporters. Using information supplied by the Indian Arrival Committee (IAC) – who culled statistics from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) database and some other international sources – it was concluded that Guyana is 254 years behind Singapore….The economic policies of that Asian giant boggled my mind. For one, its leader bought foreign talent when the country had none, but there was a caveat. For every two foreigners there needed to be one Singaporean. There was no attempt to get the foreigner to pay a bribe….The strange thing is that we have examples to follow; instead we have opted to do our own thing. The result is stagnation and a people who merely want to leave the country by any means possible. In this day and age we have skilled Guyanese running to other countries to peddle their ability.
Singapore  Guyana  Guyanese  Lee_Kuan_Yew  books  city-states  disappointment  economic_development  economic_stagnation 
july 2015 by jerryking
Singapore reminds us of Burnham and the PNC’s colossal failure
AUGUST 23, 2014 | : Kaieteur News| M. Maxwell.

Guyana and Singapore started at fairly similar points of economic development in the early sixties. Guyana had the advantage of far greater resources and a smaller population base. Today, Singapore is a developed nation and economic powerhouse while Guyana paddles around in the gutter economically.
Singapore  Guyana  PNC  economic_development  economic_stagnation  Lee_Kuan_Yew  LFSB 
march 2015 by jerryking
From jungle to juggernaut: How Singapore pulled off its economic miracle - The Globe and Mail
IAN McGUGAN
From jungle to juggernaut: How Singapore pulled off its economic miracle
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 23 2015
Singapore  economic_development  Lee_Kuan_Yew 
march 2015 by jerryking
Rust Belt revival: Lessons for southwest Ontario from America’s industrial heartland - The Globe and Mail
ADAM RADWANSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 16 2015

Not all the start-ups and emerging businesses in Grand Rapids are as sexy. Some are tied to auto parts and office furniture, the traditional manufacturing around which Grand Rapids was built. Others are in communications technology or health sciences. Notwithstanding some growing financial-services companies, they tend to fit into the region’s proud history of making things.

As the Brookings Institute’s Vey notes, that tradition – and the accompanying institutional knowledge and infrastructure – can help Rust Belt cities take advantage of the current “maker’s movement,” in which a DIY culture makes the manufacturing market accessible to small enterprises.
revitalization  rust_belt  Southwestern_Ontario  industrial_Midwest  economic_development  institutional_knowledge  Pittsburgh  urban  urban_decline  philanthropy  cities  DIY  entrepreneurship  start_ups  manufacturers  Makerspace  Colleges_&_Universities 
january 2015 by jerryking
If enough African-Guyanese return to their capitalist roots Guyana’s economic future will see improvement Georgetown, Guyana
JANUARY 8, 2010 |- Stabroek News | Michael Maxwell.

The question is whether the state or the individual/community bears primary responsibility for wealth creation with focus on the African-Guyanese populace. Unquestionably, both the state and the individual are responsible for facilitating the creation and pursuit of legitimate wealth. ...Orientation to wealth creation in the African-Guyanese community is presently stymied by several factors, most notably a poor personal saving rate, low investment rate, business risk aversion, low communal wealth generation endeavours and high public sector and service sector participation rate. ...A bigger problem for African-Guyanese capitalism and entrepreneurism is its lack of support from its own group. African-Guyanese businessmen and the community must lead the charge in educating African-Guyanese about the benefits of personal and commercial wealth generation......The greatest form of empowerment is economic empowerment, and dramatically so for a poor people in a poor nation. That is the true measure of freedom. Without a strong African-Guyanese capitalist class in Guyana alongside the Indian-Guyanese capitalist class the nation cannot achieve a decent path of economic progress. Wealth creation is not an alien concept to African-Guyanese who were the first independent producers in Guyana after slavery before becoming a mostly entrenched consumer and service providing class to the primary capitalists.
Afro-Guyanese  wealth_creation  capitalism  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Guyana  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  support_systems  generational_wealth  individual_initiative  economic_empowerment  risk-aversion  public_sector  distrust  disunity 
september 2014 by jerryking
Brics Agree to Base Development Bank in Shanghai - WSJ
By JEFFREY T. LEWIS and PAULO TREVISANI CONNECT
Updated July 15, 2014

The Brics and other emerging-market countries have vast needs for financing of infrastructure projects, according to the chief executive of Brazilian development bank BNDES, who estimated the need for long-term project finance at about $800 billion.

The new institution, whose first chief executive will be from India, will start out with capital of $50 billion, to be paid in equally by all five Brics countries. Capital is planned to grow eventually to $100 billion, according to the memorandum released after the meeting in Brazil of the heads of government of the five countries.

The Brics have been trying for years to reform the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, the backbone of the world's global financial structure, to give emerging markets more influence over those institutions, but with little success.

"In the IMF and the World Bank, the U.S. and a handful of allies really do make almost all the decisions, and the vast majority of the world…doesn't really have a voice," said Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, D.C. "The fund has lost most of its influence on the middle-income country in the last 15 years. This is part of the process of change in these international institutions."

The Brics countries on Tuesday called on the members of the IMF to implement reforms to the organization that were agreed on in 2010, and for members to agree to a new formula for voting rights at the IMF.

The World Bank finances development projects around the world, and the IMF is the lender of last resort to countries that don't have the dollars to pay their foreign debt. The IMF in particular is widely disliked among countries that need its help, because of the stringent budget control conditions it usually places on governments in return for its help.
economic_development  BRIC  Vladimir_Putin  IMF  World_Bank  infrastructure 
july 2014 by jerryking
Bloomberg Focuses on Rest (as in Rest of the World) - NYTimes.com
December 14, 2013 | NYT | By MICHAEL BARBARO.

Bloomberg Associates will be a project that is the first concrete phase of a post-mayoral life that aides said would remain intensely focused on cities, long viewed by him as laboratories for large-scale experiments in public health, economic development and environmental sustainability.

Above all, the new endeavor reflects a profound confidence — never in short supply with this mayor — that it would behoove dozens of municipalities to replicate the ideas that defined his tenure: turning busy roads into pedestrian plazas, posting calorie counts in fast-food chains, creating a customer-service hotline for citizens....The consulting group is the latest chapter in Mr. Bloomberg’s long journey from political neophyte to much-admired mentor to fellow mayors, dozens of whom have flocked to City Hall to study his open-seat bullpen layout, attended his conferences about urban innovation and applied for grants from his foundation (called “mayors’ school” by several city leaders who have spent time there).
Michael_Bloomberg  New_York_City  Second_Acts  management_consulting  hotlines  data  data_driven  cities  mayoral  large-scale  public_health  economic_development  sustainability  environment 
december 2013 by jerryking
Canada’s future depends on a new deal with First Nations - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 29 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Bob Rae.

Two underlying trends are now making the issue of genuine and deep reconciliation a matter of necessity rather than mere political choice: a continuing expansion of Canada’s resource industries to the heartland of traditional first nations’ territories, and a demographic revolution that is transforming Canada’s inner cities – first nations are no longer “out there”, they are now “right here”.

The challenge of reconciliation will require a clearer and stronger response from all sides. “Capacity building” is not a one way street. But there is an important paradigm shift underway: First Nations are taking an ownership stake in infrastructure, hydro, and other developments; companies are addressing issues of jobs, training, and equity participation; governments are beginning to address issues of revenue sharing.
aboriginals  economic_development  reconciliation  Bob_Rae  natural_resources  capacity-building  paradigm_shifts 
december 2013 by jerryking
How Jeffrey Sachs failed to save Africa - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Sep. 21 2013

What he forgot was the human factor. It turns out that people are not always rational. They don’t always do what’s in their own best interests, even when the benefits are completely clear to a development economist.....At every turn, Mr. Sachs’s master plan was undermined by culture.
Jeffrey_Sachs  economics  Africa  economic_development  Margaret_Wente  economists  failure  human_factor 
november 2013 by jerryking
The pivot point
September 27, 2013 | RoB Magazine | Gordon Pitts.
Kevin Lynch's big ideas on reviving the East Coast economy don't include big government
economic_development  Gordon_Pitts  Atlantic_Canada  immigration  immigrants  Kevin_Lynch  thinking_big 
september 2013 by jerryking
African Guyanese leaders must be much more development oriented
November 20, 2007 | Stabroek News | by Lin-Jay Harry-Voglezon.

Cheddi Jagan said around 1990, that the PNC government was preparing the Afro community to fail. He meant the high concentration of Afro Guyanese in the bloated public service sector which was unsustainable, and the practice of giving them opportunities on the basis of party cards, as a way of up-keeping the government, would backfire on the community. He meant that when the system of things changed the community would be uncompetitive for it would by then have nurtured the wrong ethics, expectations, and attitudes. The psyche of dependency on the state would be so ingrained that it would fail to be as resourceful as it is ought to be and was capable of being........I have argued in the past that the Afro community, owing to its historical conditions of survival, had crystallised a false sense of importance and security under PNC governance. I indicated that it is not a government of black faces, PNC or otherwise that would transform the Afro communities, but transformation in cultural ideas and economic groundings, which could be induced through changed conditions of survival and an improved understanding of self. Of all Afro leaders, Walter Rodney was best trained and equipped to lead that transformation. His death was a tremendous loss.

This additional response to Osafo Modibo’s letters is that the problems at Buxton are fundamentally symptomatic of cultural and economic deficiencies. While Modibo accuses myself and others of being silent on the extremities in that village he fails to acknowledge that the very executors of the excesses are mainly Afro Guyanese. The Afro community should realise that the highest form of emancipation would be when every black child grows up with the doctrine that he must be black, honourable and economically creative. So whether he is poor, rich, or an officer of state he must never pawn his common sense and dignity to others.
uncompetitive  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Afro-Guyanese  ethnic_communities  entrepreneurship  mindsets  generational_wealth  public_sector  psyche_of_dependency  human_psyche  Cheddi_Jagan  cultural_values  false_sense_of_security 
september 2013 by jerryking
African-Guyanese need to invest time and resources in agriculture
May 19, 2011 | Stabroek News | by Richard Drake.

I believe that what black communities lack the most is money and wealth. A causal observation of any black community will reveal that the stranglehold of poverty is affecting their growth and development. The high number of dilapidated buildings, poor roads, water and sanitation are manifest expressions of that poverty. There are a number of reasons for this I shall discuss two.

First, our attitude towards money is bad. Look at the way we spend our hard-earned money in entertainment. Almost every show at the Providence Stadium is filled to capacity with young and not so young African-Guyanese. Every show young Blacks spend thousands of dollars they can hardly afford. We entertain ourselves at the expense of everything else, even our development.

Second, a large percentage of African-Guyanese work in the public sector; they are public servants. The government controls the public purse. Therefore, it decides how much these servants will be paid and how much they should be taxed. In this way, they do exert a great deal of power over the development of Blacks and influence the quality of their lives and communities.

One can argue that there are trade unions which negotiate with government, wages and salaries for workers. However, given the behaviour of the unions demonstrated at the last May Day rally, the divisions among them, and the fact that some of their leaders appear to have been bought out by the government one can hardly expect a decent challenge by these organizations to the unfairness in the national pay system.

As a result, the average public servant lives from pay cheque to pay cheque. It is a vicious cycle.

What is clear is that African-Guyanese desperately need a paradigm shift. African-Guyanese must get out of the public sector now. We need to begin to ‘re-image’ ourselves not as servants (public or otherwise) but as entrepreneurs. This is absolutely necessary for wealth creation and development.

One area that is immediately available to us is agriculture. There is a lot of history in the black community in this industry and much aversion to it, particularly by our young people but, there is enormous potential in this industry. Export markets are available for all kinds of non-traditional produce. However, we are too busy sitting behind desks burdened with loads of paperwork that we cannot see and exploit the potential in this sector. We love the sound of the names and status of certain positions in the public sector. Some of those very positions retard our growth and progress. We have to change that.

As a people, we need to invest time and resources in the agriculture industry; we need to go back to the land en masse. Black families and communities must become efficient economic units, generating wealth for real development through large-scale crop and animal husbandry. This will make us self employed, reduce the amount we spend in purchasing food, decrease our dependence on others to supply us with food and free up money for other investment activities. It will help in wealth generation in black communities.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  Afro-Guyanese  agriculture  wealth_creation  ethnic_communities  economic_development  entrepreneurship  mindsets  public_sector  overrepresentation  farming  fresh_produce  non-traditional  generational_wealth  self-employment  frugality  downward_spirals  poverty  public_servants  paradigm_shifts  African_Guyanese_villages  young_people  psyche_of_dependency 
august 2013 by jerryking
African Guyanese would require an empowering familial-ethnic environment and an enabling political-economic one to be successful in business
August 21, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Hamley Casep.

Few African Guyanese grow up in an environment in which table conversation is centred around business matters or matters to do with the production and supply of goods and services. Sadly, African Guyanese may be more inclined to discuss the day’s purchases rather than the day’s sales, for the simple reason that African Guyanese economic activity tends more towards consumption rather than production or supply. Generally speaking, African Guyanese do not see themselves as having the means to produce ‒ land, labour or capital ‒ at their disposal, yet see these as prerequisites for venturing into business for themselves. The problem is compounded by the near absence of ethnic role models. In this sense I feel the problem is one of environment as much as education. In fact the two go hand in hand.

Though as Carl Greenidge says, “The education system should be teaching students about the value of business and what is required to be an entrepreneur” and has failed to do so, the system on its own cannot teach people to be risk takers. It is only the immediate environment that can build the level of self-confidence required to make the difference. There is no substitute for growing up in the environment of a family which is not dysfunctional where Uncle Peter is a car dealer, Aunt Sharon owns a supermarket and Cousin Kimberly owns a successful restaurant. These close-to-home realities have a far greater impact on a young person’s realization that they too can become a successful business person.
Afro-Guyanese  cultural_values  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  entrepreneurship  generational_wealth  consumption  role_models  entrepreneur  risk-taking  factors_of_production  family 
august 2013 by jerryking
Debate flares up over Northern Ontario's Ring of Fire - The Globe and Mail
JOSH WINGROVE

THUNDER BAY, ONT. — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 05 2013,

The so-called Ring of Fire is a 5,000-square-kilometre crescent of chromite, nickel, copper, zinc and gold – a vast deposit discovered a decade ago in remote Northern Ontario, much of it inaccessible by road and surrounded by nine Matawa First Nations. Interest in development took off when Mr. Gravelle held the mining portfolio from 2007 to 2011. /// The Ring of Fire’s proponents say it would be a jolt to the national economy. Tony Clement, the federal cabinet minister responsible for economic development in Northern Ontario, has estimated the deposit’s value at between $30-billion and $50-billion.
Ring_of_Fire  Ontario  Bob_Rae  aboriginals  economic_development  mining 
july 2013 by jerryking
St. Louis Looks to Regain Its Startup Mojo - WSJ.com
June 11, 2013 | WSJ | By BEN CASSELMAN

Cities Hunt for Startup Magic, Entrepreneurial Culture Seen as Growth Key; $100 Million Seed Fund in St. Louis
start_ups  St._Louis  cities  municipalities  economic_development 
june 2013 by jerryking
Africa's Economic Boom
May/June 2013 | | Foreign Affairs | By Shantayanan Devarajan and Wolfgang Fengler.
Africa  economic_development 
june 2013 by jerryking
Canada’s African adventure takes a colonial turn - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by DOUG SAUNDERS.

Even though Ottawa had shifted its foreign-aid focus away from Africa a few years ago, the government has come back in force, with a new large-scale aid strategy in which its agencies work with resource companies, alongside charities and private aid groups, in a way that, in the words of International Co-operation Minister Julian Fantino, “addresses social and environmental issues of extractive sector development” and helps countries “use resource rents and investment to spur economic diversification in local communities, often focused on agricultural and agribusiness development.” It makes some sense: Canada ought to be providing this sort of aid to the people it’s contacting – sometimes beneficially, sometimes otherwise – with its resource-taking activities.

But the end effect is that Canada has landed in Africa in a big way: tearing up the land, building new towns, creating roads and pipelines and airports, and bringing in new forms of government and administration to create new economies and enforce human rights and democratic standards.

This bears a strong resemblance to what the military calls counterinsurgency: To make the local population tolerate your forceful acts and embrace your cause, you win over their hearts and minds by building roads, schools, water supplies and better farms. In the process, though, you become something like a colonial government.

Canada, not yet fully free from its own years as a colony, is far from comfortable with this role. We ought to find some other name, and some other shape, for our African project.
Africa  counterinsurgency  CSR  economic_development  economic_diversification  natural_resources  mining  Canada  Doug_Saunders  foreign_aid  corruption  oil_industry  engineering  colonialism  large-scale  resource_extraction 
february 2013 by jerryking
Too many first nations people live in a dream palace
Jan. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON.

Large elements of aboriginal Canada live intellectually in a dream palace, a more comfortable place than where they actually reside.

Inside the dream palace, there are self-reliant, self-sustaining communities – “nations,” indeed – with the full panoply of sovereign capacities and the “rights” that go with sovereignty. These “nations” are the descendants of proud ancestors who, centuries ago, spread across certain territories before and, for some period, after the “settlers” arrived.
Today’s reality, however, is so far removed in actual day-to-day terms from the memories inside the dream palace as to be almost unbearable. The obvious conflict between reality and dream pulls some aboriginals to warrior societies; others to a rejection of dealing with the “Crown” at all; others to fights for the restoration of “rights” that, even if defined, would make little tangible difference in the lives of aboriginal people; and still others, such as Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, to go on a hunger strike....Stephen Harper was correct in refusing a face-to-face meeting, since a prime minister should not be blackmailed into doing what any group or individual wants....Much of the rhetoric surrounding Chief Spence is of the usual dreamy, flamboyant variety, a mixture of anti-capitalism and anti-colonialism, blended with the mythology (blasted by the reality of what one actually sees on too many reserves) about environmental protection and the aboriginals’ sacred link to their lands....To imagine that isolated communities of a thousand or so people can be vibrant and self-sustaining, capable of discharging the panoply of responsibilities of “sovereignty,” is to live within the dream palace of memory.
aboriginals  Jeffrey_Simpson  self-delusions  protests  economic_development  emotional_blackmail  Stephen_Harper  myths  anti-capitalism  anti-colonialism  self-reliance  self-sustaining  sovereignty  anti-development 
january 2013 by jerryking
Absolutism in the Church of Green - The Globe and Mail
GORDON GIBSON

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Dec. 31 2012,

Our competitive edge in this world is no longer skilled labour and capital. The world is awash in both. We either responsibly exploit our natural resources or settle for less health care, education and lower pensions.

A choice of automatic opposition to resource development is one option, if that’s what we collectively want. But that choice should be understood as a public policy question with consequences, not as a religious one of no cost.
Absolutism  environment  green  natural_resources  resource_extraction  economic_development  public_policy  consequences  resource_development  anti-development 
january 2013 by jerryking
Swallowing Rain Forest, Brazilian Cities Surge in Amazon - NYTimes.com
November 24, 2012 | NYT | By SIMON ROMERO.

The Amazon has been viewed for ages as a vast quilt of rain forest interspersed by remote river outposts. But the surging population growth of cities in the jungle is turning that rural vision on its head and alarming scientists, as an array of new industrial projects transforms the Amazon into Brazil’s fastest-growing region....Of the 19 Brazilian cities that the latest census indicates have doubled in population over the past decade, 10 are in the Amazon. Altogether, the region’s population climbed 23 percent from 2000 to 2010, while Brazil as a whole grew just 12 percent....The soaring population growth in some cities in the Amazon — called the “world’s last great settlement frontier” by Brian J. Godfrey, a geography professor at Vassar College who is the co-author of “Rainforest Cities” — is intensifying an urbanization that has been advancing for decades.
Brazil  Amazon_forest  cities  urban  urbanization  deforestation  population_growth  economic_development  inland  affluence  internal_migration 
november 2012 by jerryking
Obama’s Moment - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 20, 2012
Obama  Tom_Friedman  economic_development 
november 2012 by jerryking
4 Lessons for Building a Stronger Tech Economy in Cities - Technology - The Atlantic Cities
Edward Alden
Sep 14, 2012
* Necessity is truly the mother of invention. Over the past 40 years, Detroit has lost almost two-thirds of its population, shrinking from a city of 2 million residents in the 1950s to one of just over 700,000 today, with the steepest drop in the past decade.
* Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery – at least until we figure out how to do it better.
* Cities, even ones that have fallen on hard times, are still cool.
* Rome wasn’t built — or rebuilt — in a day. Diversifying an economy like Detroit’s will take a long time.
cities  Detroit  economic_development  lessons_learned  depopulation  hard_times 
september 2012 by jerryking
Africa Must Play a Part in Its Own Development - WSJ.com
August 15, 2003 |WSJ | Gralee Parr.

The authors cite Uganda as a modest success story, writing that President Yoweri Museveni is "authoritarian," but "seeks to run a rule-based society, not one run by mercurial fiat." In the book "Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa," author Keith Richburg recalls asking Mr. Museveni why Africa hadn't developed. Mr. Museveni ascribed it to "discipline." He added, "I tend to find more discipline among the Ugandan Asians than among the Africans," though he couldn't fully explain why. Cultural differences clearly are key.

Prosperous societies can't exist in a vacuum. As economist Thomas Sowell has shown, the cultural values of a people strongly influence their skills, choices of work and level of success. So the real question for Africans must be, "How can we change our cultural values in order to promote freedom and prosperity?" Unfortunately, until those values do change, Africa will continue to be poor.
letters_to_the_editor  Africa  Uganda  poverty  economists  values  Thomas_Sowell  self-help  economic_development  authoritarian  self-discipline  cultural_values  books  rules-based 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Greece Makes, the World Might Take - NYTimes.com
By ADAM DAVIDSON
Published: July 3, 2012

In the last decade or so, companies in the United States, France, Denmark and elsewhere flouted the feta ruling and invested in their own food-science research and manufacturing equipment. They subsequently turned the salty, crumbly cheese into spreadable, grillable, fat-free and shelf-stable forms. In Italy and Spain, small olive-oil producers merged into globally competitive conglomerates and replaced presses with more efficient centrifugal technology. The two countries now provide nearly all the world’s supply. And the Greeks, despite their numerous inherent advantages, remain in the least profitable part of the supply chain, exporting raw materials at slim margins.

Tassos Chronopoulos, owner of Tassos, a Greek food importer based outside Chicago, says that the country’s disorganized agricultural business all but disqualified itself from partaking in the fancy-food craze of the past few decades. Greek growers never banded together to establish uniform quality standards and trade rules.
agribusiness  agriculture  cheese  competitiveness_of_nations  conglomerates  dairy  Denmark  disorganization  economic_development  farming  food  food_science  foodies  foodservice  France  gourmet  Greece  Greek  innovation  olive-oil  quality  quality_control  rules_of_the_game  standardization  standards  supply_chains  value_chains 
july 2012 by jerryking
Investing in Africa Can Be a Challenge -- But Good Deals Are on the Horizon - Knowledge@Wharton
March 09, 2005 in Knowledge@Wharton

Private-equity investors haven't fared much better than money managers who buy shares in public companies, according to Runa Alam, chief executive of Zephyr Management Africa, the South Africa-based subsidiary of a New York investment company. Like Oyeleke, she stressed that African companies have few venues for raising public money: "You have Johannesburg and London." Unlike Oyeleke, she argued that investors have plenty of deals to choose from. Her firm looked at more than 50 last year alone. But she pointed out that these deals tend to be concentrated in a few countries -- Nigeria, Egypt and South Africa -- and a few sectors, such as telecom, financial institutions and resource extraction.
Africa  challenges  economic_development  investing  investors  Kenya  Nigeria  resource_extraction  private_equity  funding  Egypt  South_Africa  telecom  financial_institutions 
june 2012 by jerryking
Businessman Parlays Expertise to Help Others
Aug 1995 | Emerge | Ernest Holsendolph.

''I think that those at us who have been fortunate enough to gain the contacts should reach out to help true entrepreneurs with financing and the know-how to build significant businesses that can employ large numbers of people," Hill says. "I'm developing people and I can help by opening doors that no one elee can open"...."lf I were to come along today, l would get an MBA. I would aim for management and finance and I would be drawn to economic development -- especially ways to stimulate the urban ecunamy and help Black people be employed," Hill says. "I just don't believe there is any higher calling for a talented business person these days than to tackle the job of developing our communities."
African-Americans  trailblazers  retirement  Atlanta  entrepreneur  airports  actuarial_science  urban  economic_development 
june 2012 by jerryking
An intellectual with the gloves off
24 May 2003 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3| by John Allemang.

Tellingly, the former World Bank economist didn't just parade these hard facts as essential truths, but contrasted them with the soft-centred nostalgia felt by academics with a more sentimental education. "There's a tendency on the part of Western intellectuals to idealize rural life, and poor rural life, in developing countries."....His model of a university, which sounds a lot like a roundtable gathering at the White House, is of "a tough-minded place where there's a tough-minded clash of ideas, from which better ideas emerge." It's not an institution for the faint-hearted, and you can see that much of his impatience with the people and ideas he's confronted at Harvard have as much to do with a perceived lack of intellectual rigour as with their positioning on the spectrum of truth.
Larry_Summers  Harvard  intellectually_rigorous  deanships  Colleges_&_Universities  grade_inflation  growth  economic_development  truth-telling  tough-mindedness  developing_countries 
may 2012 by jerryking
OBR - Ontario Business Report
Ask editor about back issues e.g. January 2002
Ontario  magazines  economic_development 
may 2012 by jerryking
Food Start-Ups Flock to Old Pfizer Factory in Brooklyn - NYTimes.com
March 27, 2012 | NYT | By RONDA KAYSEN.

Pfizer’s decision prompted a feverish community effort to convert the property to a mixture of affordable housing, retail and manufacturing. But those hopes were dashed when Pfizer abandoned plans to convert the factory to affordable housing.

In February 2011, it sold the eight-story plant and adjoining parking lot to Acumen, a firm that specializes in adapting industrial properties for new uses. Pfizer is still trying to sell several remaining parcels.

Pfizer provided Acumen with financing to purchase the factory and parking lot, a decision that Pfizer officials point to as an example of the company’s commitment to the neighborhood.
affordable_housing  Brooklyn  economic_development  food  incubators  manufacturers  New_York_City  Pfizer 
march 2012 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Esther Duflo - FT.com
March 17, 2012 1:11 am
Lunch with the FT: Esther Duflo

By John Gapper
randomized  MIT  economists  economic_development  poverty  Esther_Duflo 
march 2012 by jerryking
Oakland Seeks a Lift From Pop-Up Stores - WSJ.com
JANUARY 12, 2012 | WSJ | By LAUREN RUDSER.

Pop-up stores aren't a new phenomenon—often they are seasonal, setting up for holidays like Halloween or Christmas. Restaurants also occasionally pop up for a night or two to test a new menu or location. Such stores have become more prevalent nationwide with the increasing number of storefronts left vacant amid a weak economy, says Jesse Tron, a spokesman with the International Council of Shopping Centers.

What makes popuphood different is the number of stores opening simultaneously, and the goal of going from pop-up to permanent.
pop-ups  economic_development  urban  cities  weak_economy  shopping_malls  store_openings  testing  holidays 
january 2012 by jerryking
U of T contributes to New York's push for academic excellence
john lorinc
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011

The University of Toronto has joined a team of international schools to make a bid to build a $450-million urban sciences campus in Brooklyn, N.Y.

The deal includes a promise of city-owned land and $100-million in seed capital. It is part of an ambitious plan by New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg to develop a world-class engineering and research commercialization facility. ...Mr. Bloomberg, with his trademark alacrity, wants shovels in the ground by 2013, when he leaves office. “The sense of urgency comes directly form the mayor,” said Seth Pinsky, president of New York’s economic development agency. “We have a limited window of opportunity.”

The radical economic development scheme, considered by many to be the mayor’s legacy project, is expected to generate $6-billion in spin-off investment and create 30,000 creative-class jobs in coming decades.

Mr. Pinsky describes the strategy as “an Erie Canal moment,” a reference to a controversial 1820s decision by a state governor to build an upstate shipping channel. The investment that drove vast wealth into the port of New York....“It may be the single most transformative investment of the Bloomberg administration,” said Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Initiative at the University of Toronto. “I only wish more cities would think that way.”

With large Canadian universities stuffed to capacity and some provinces considering new campuses, New York’s experiment is a game-changing wealth-generating strategy and ups the ante for big cities like Toronto and Vancouver, said Dr. Florida. “If you see a place like New York moving in this direction, you’ve just seen your biggest competitor take a big step ahead.”
uToronto  Colleges_&_Universities  New_York_City  Michael_Bloomberg  John_Lorinc  urgency  transformational  Erie_Canal  windows_of_opportunity  Richard_Florida  upstate  game_changers  economic_development  wealth_creation  cities  creative_class  the_single_most_important  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
october 2011 by jerryking
No Rice, No Water-- Can You Hear Me Now?
By: Marjorie Valbrun | Posted: May 21, 2008.

Mobile phones are helping people climb out of poverty, spurring small-scale entrepreneurship, promoting development and even helping farmers and market women work more efficiently and earn more money.

The story of what is happening in Haiti is part of a larger trend taking place in developing countries around the globe, particularly in Asia and Africa. The world is witnessing a seismic social, cultural and technological shift that is changing how people work, live and thrive – all because of cell phones.
Haiti  mobile_phones  economic_development  tools  remittances  ZoomPesa  seismic_shifts  developing_countries 
october 2011 by jerryking
Cohen and Giardino: The Empire State Can Rise Again - WSJ.com
JULY 23, 2011 By JONATHAN COHEN AND JOHN GIARDINO

The Empire State Can Rise Again
Upstate cities like Buffalo and Rochester were once powerhouses. They
can be again, if politicians encourage local entrepreneurship
Buffalo  Rochester  New_York  revitalization  turnarounds  economic_development  out-migration  SUNY  entrepreneurship  upstate 
july 2011 by jerryking
Business clusters ‘irrelevant’ for innovation, study finds - The Globe and Mail
Naomi Powell
March 18, 2011
At some point, the “business cluster” emerged as a kind of silver bullet
for economically-challenged municipalities.

Find a way to put companies together in a single geographic area and
they will become each other’s customers, suppliers and collaborators.
Innovation, prosperity and jobs will follow.

A new study from Europe’s Centre for Economic Policy Research throws a
wrench into at least one part of that theory.

The analysis of 1,604 companies in the five largest Norwegian cities
found that regional and national clusters are “irrelevant for
innovation.” On the contrary, international cooperation or “global
pipelines” were identified as the main drivers of innovation.
michael_porter  economic_development  innovation  clusters  irrelevance  Norway 
march 2011 by jerryking
Aerotropolis: The Airport-Based Global City of Tomorrow - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 26, 2011 | wsj | By GREG LINDSAY. From Dubai to
Chongqing to Honduras, the Silk Road of the future is taking shape in
urban developments based on airport hubs. Welcome to the world of the
'aerotropolis.' an amalgam of made-to-order office parks, convention
hotels, cargo complexes and even factories, which in some cases line the
runways. It is a pure node in a global network whose fast-moving
packets are people and goods instead of data. And it is the future of
the global city. ...The basic aim of an aerotropolis is to disrupt local
incumbents and monopolies using the long arm of air travel. It allows
Indian hospitals to entice American heart patients for top-notch surgery
at rock-bottom prices. It lets factories move out to the far reaches of
western China to manufacture the iPad for lower wages while absorbing
millions of urban migrants. Detroit's leaders are even building an
aerotropolis in a Hail Mary bid for Chinese investment.
airports  economic_development  design  industrial_policies  Dubai  globalization  logistics  Paul_Romer 
february 2011 by jerryking
Africa Rising: Catering to New Tastes as Incomes Climb - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 10, 2011|WSJ | By WILL CONNORS.
Africa Rising
Catering to New Tastes as Incomes Climb
Zambian Beef Processor Expands to Nigeria With Aim of Spreading Out Across the Continent
Africa  Nigeria  beef  economic_development 
february 2011 by jerryking
Putting Cleveland on Entrepreneurs' Map - WSJ.com
AUGUST 25, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By RUSSELL GARLAND
economic_development  cities 
august 2010 by jerryking
: The Politically Incorrect Guide to Ending Poverty
July/August 2010 | The Atlantic Magazine | By Sebastian
Mallaby. In the 1990s, Paul Romer revolutionized economics. In the
aughts, he became rich as a software entrepreneur. Now he’s trying to
help the poorest countries grow rich—by convincing them to establish
foreign-run “charter cities” within their borders. Romer’s idea is
unconventional, even neo-colonial—the best analogy is Britain’s historic
lease of Hong Kong. And against all odds, he just might make it happen.
noughties  poverty  economic_development  Paul_Romer  rules_of_the_game  neocolonialism  recolonization  analogies  unconventional  city-states  political_correctness  enclaves  Hong_Kong  economic  economists 
june 2010 by jerryking
AlterNet: Are We on the Brink of a New Deal for Local Economies?
April 30, 2010 | YES! Magazine | By Stacy Mitchell. "...While
signs abound that people are rediscovering the benefits of an economy
rooted in community and small-scale enterprise, all of this activity,
though widespread, is still quite modest. It exists largely on the
margins and is unlikely to coalesce into a wholesale reorganization of
our economy unless we change the rules. "
local  economic_development  farmers'_markets  community  small_business 
may 2010 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read