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jerryking : economic_empowerment   11

The APNU+AFC Govt. and African Guyanese: After three years, no major Policy Initiative that targets Black Empowerment – Kaieteur News
May 13, 2018 | | Hinds' Sight with Dr. David Hinds.

Many African Guyanese believe that any criticism of this APNU+AFC government, especially by one of their own, is sinful. This is the very attitude that was exhibited by many Indian Guyanese when the PPP held office and which African Guyanese found revolting. But now, with their government in power, African Guyanese are behaving in the same manner. This hypocrisy by our ethnic communities is at the root of Guyana’s failure to move from the backward politics of colonial domination to a more enlightened politics that embrace equality of opportunity and national consensus as guiding principles. And this failure has impeded economic liberation from poverty and want, and kept us a poor, underdeveloped country.......Most African Guyanese live in the urban areas and in ancestral villages. But these spaces are hardly hubs of economic opportunities. Three years after its assumption of office, there is still no comprehensive Urban and Village renewal initiative. Many African Guyanese villages and communities don’t have markets, for example. Hence, there is little money circulation in those communities.
I know there are many who would say that Village and Urban Renewal are not government business. I beg to disagree. The poor state of those communities is a direct result of government policies, so the repair job must be initiated by government policy.
Afro-Guyanese  African_Guyanese_villages  David_Hinds  disempowerment  economic_empowerment  economic_development  economic_dynamism  economically_disadvantaged  equality_of_opportunity  ethnic_communities  Guyana  Guyanese  institutions  politics  revitalization 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Memo: Five Rules for Your Economic Liberation: John Hope Bryant: 9781523084562: Amazon.com: Books
True power in this world comes from economic independence, but too many people have too much month left at the end of their money. John Hope Bryant, founder and CEO of Operation HOPE, illuminates the path toward liberation that is hiding in plain sight. His message is simple: the supermajority of people who live in poverty, whom Bryant calls the invisible class, as well as millions in the struggling middle class, haven't gotten “the memo”—until now.

Building on his personal experience of rising up from economically disadvantaged circumstances and his work with Operation HOPE, Bryant teaches readers five rules that lay the foundation for achieving financial freedom. He emphasizes the inseparable connection between “inner capital” (mindset, relationships, knowledge, and spirit) and “outer capital” (financial wealth and property). “If you have inner capital,” Bryant writes, “you can never be truly poor. If you lack inner capital, all the money in the world cannot set you free.”

Bryant gives readers tools for empowerment by covering everything from achieving basic financial literacy to investing in positive relationships and approaching wealth with a completely new attitude. He makes this bold and controversial claim: “Once you have satisfied your basic sustenance needs—food, water, health, and a roof over your head—poverty has more to do with your head than your wallet.”

Bryant wants to restore readers' “silver rights,” giving them the ability to succeed and prosper no matter what very real roadblocks society puts in their way. We have more power than we realize, if only we can recognize and claim it. “We are our first capital,” Bryant writes. “We are the CEOs of our own lives.
African-Americans  books  economically_disadvantaged  economic_empowerment  individual_agency  individual_autonomy  It's_up_to_me  James_Baldwin  knowledge  mindsets  personal_economy  poverty  relationships 
august 2017 by jerryking
Forget Endorsements: Sports and Entertainment Stars These Days Want Equity - Knowledge@Wharton
$40 Million Slaves by William C. Rhoden, a sportswriter for the New York Times. Rhoden argues that superstar African-American athletes have failed to take advantage of their opportunities to become self-made entrepreneurs, and that integration actually damaged — in the short-term, anyway — the possibilities for black coaches, trainers and even agents.
entertainment_industry  athletes_&_athletics  self-made  African-Americans  endorsements  economic_empowerment  equity  long-term  Wharton  conferences  books  superstars 
may 2016 by jerryking
If enough African-Guyanese return to their capitalist roots Guyana’s economic future will see improvement Georgetown, Guyana
JANUARY 8, 2010 |- Stabroek News | Michael Maxwell.

The question is whether the state or the individual/community bears primary responsibility for wealth creation with focus on the African-Guyanese populace. Unquestionably, both the state and the individual are responsible for facilitating the creation and pursuit of legitimate wealth. ...Orientation to wealth creation in the African-Guyanese community is presently stymied by several factors, most notably a poor personal saving rate, low investment rate, business risk aversion, low communal wealth generation endeavours and high public sector and service sector participation rate. ...A bigger problem for African-Guyanese capitalism and entrepreneurism is its lack of support from its own group. African-Guyanese businessmen and the community must lead the charge in educating African-Guyanese about the benefits of personal and commercial wealth generation......The greatest form of empowerment is economic empowerment, and dramatically so for a poor people in a poor nation. That is the true measure of freedom. Without a strong African-Guyanese capitalist class in Guyana alongside the Indian-Guyanese capitalist class the nation cannot achieve a decent path of economic progress. Wealth creation is not an alien concept to African-Guyanese who were the first independent producers in Guyana after slavery before becoming a mostly entrenched consumer and service providing class to the primary capitalists.
Afro-Guyanese  wealth_creation  capitalism  letters_to_the_editor  economic_development  Guyana  self-determination  self-discipline  self-employment  self-help  support_systems  generational_wealth  individual_initiative  economic_empowerment  risk-aversion  public_sector  distrust  disunity 
september 2014 by jerryking
On a mission for black founders - FT.com
September 3, 2013 5:01 pm
On a mission for black founders

By Andrew England
Africa  empowerment  economic_empowerment  entrepreneur  founders  South_Africa 
september 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  capital_accumulation  capital_formation  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_empowerment  economic_nationalism  ethnic_communities  judges  mindsets  producer_mindset  self-reliance  self-determination  strategic_thinking  tribes  trustworthiness 
january 2013 by jerryking
Return to Self-Reliance
August 13, 1997 | Wall Street Journal | Jason L. Riley

A sad truth of late-20th-century black history is the lack of emphasis black leaders have placed on economic independence, opting instead to funnel resources toward integrating predominantly white institutions, be they political, corporate or educational. Such was not always the thinking; indeed, blacks left bondage with a very different mind-set.

"When you think back to the situation right after the Emancipation Proclamation, African-Americans did a couple things coming right out of slavery," Mr. Price said recently in an interview. "They started up colleges and they started up businesses, like independent farms and burial societies that led to the creation of insurance companies. And as black folks moved into the cities, they started everything that came with living there--barber shops, grocery stores, hotels."

Part of the reason blacks were able to do these things despite the racial barriers of Reconstruction and, later, Jim Crow, was the guidance and support of individuals such as Booker T. Washington. The pre-eminent black leader of the late 1800s and early 1900s, Washington was a shrewd self-help advocate and educator, and a relentless promoter of black economic independence. In 1901, the black novelist Pauline Hopkins called him "probably the most talked of Afro-American in the civilized world today."

A famous William Johnson painting of Washington shows the former slave addressing a class full of attentive black children. The blackboard behind him depicts a plow, a shovel, books and writing instruments--symbolizing the "tools" Washington realized were essential to the postslavery progress of his race. Demonstrating a keen understanding of the central role money and wealth accumulation play in advancing a people, Washington said: "No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized."
Jason_Riley  African-Americans  conservatism  Booker_T._Washington  Emancipation  capital_formation  capital_accumulation  self-help  civil_rights  education  self-reliance  Jim_Crow  economic_empowerment  generational_wealth  institutions  desegregation  history  Reconstruction  leaders 
september 2012 by jerryking
Black entrepreneurs, please
April 7, 1990 | The Economist | Anonymous.

Politics was vital for black advancement in the 1960s and 1970s, but is less so nowadays. Mr. Jackson’s presidential campaigns fed black self-esteem—but also stoked up the myth that black America remains in need of political, as opposed to economic, leadership. The true black “leadership” is not coterminous with black politicians who manage to stay in the spotlight. In every city there are lawyers, businessmen, ministers, public-housing organizers, doctors and teachers whose cadences are less emotive than the politicians’ but whose contribution to black prosperity is more real.

The battle for civil rights has given way, as most of the old civil rights organizations themselves acknowledge, to the battle for “economic empowerment”. After a legal foundation has been laid, a minority’s prosperity will depend less on political largesse and more on economic dynamism. Reasonable men may differ on the adequacy of the foundation of America's laws against discrimination But none can doubt that the time has come to build black prosperity on it. The median income of America’s black families has barely budged over the past decade.

This is why one of the vital findings of America’s 1990 census will be the level of black entrepreneurship In 1980, 1.37% of blacks were self-employed, compared with 1.92% of Hispanics (and 5.8% of whites). Recent, largely anecdotal, evidence suggests that the level of Mexican-American business formation continues to grow faster than that of blacks. True, some Mexican entrepreneurs are immigrants and therefore, almost by definition, more willing to take risks than native’ born Americans. But black, homegrown economic dynamism is urgently needed.
entrepreneurship  African-Americans  leadership  civil_rights  economic_dynamism  Jesse_Jackson  leaders  Louis_Farrakhan  politicians  economic_empowerment  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
Black Empowerment Roils South Africa - WSJ.com
MARCH 9, 2011 | | By PETER WONACOTT

Mounting criticism of South Africa's Black Economic Empowerment policy
is coming to a head, putting black entrepreneurs amid a debate over how
to right history's wrongs without upending business. South African
Program Draws Fire. Critics Maintain Economic Policy for Black
Empowerment Benefits a Few Who Already Are Successful
South_Africa  affirmative_action  public_policy  entrepreneur  economic_empowerment 
march 2011 by jerryking

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